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how will my HR20 record Rocky 1/2/3 on TNTHD? (16 by 9, or fake high def strecthed?)

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by kathymoore, Feb 8, 2007.

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  1. Feb 8, 2007 #1 of 16
    kathymoore

    kathymoore Legend

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    how will my HR20 record Rocky 1/2/3 on TNTHD? (16 by 9, or fake high def strecthed?)
    thank you!
     
  2. Feb 8, 2007 #2 of 16
    Just J

    Just J Crivens!

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    I've seen TNT HD broadcast both formats. If their source material is is SD format (e.g., SD TV shows like NYPD Blue), they usually stretch it. If their source material is letterbox (movies, newer TV shows), then they usually broadcast in 16:9...
     
  3. Feb 8, 2007 #3 of 16
    bwaldron

    bwaldron Impossible Dreamer

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    Short answer...it will record what TNT-HD sends. Whether it will be true HD or upconverted/stretched, we won't know until they show it, since TNT labels all their content as HD, even the upconverts. It can be a PITA.
     
  4. Feb 8, 2007 #4 of 16
    mtnagel

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    That's good to know that not all stuff is streched. I recorded and watched Groundhog's Day and it was stretched. Since then, I won't record anything on TNT HD because of it. But I see that some stuff is 16:9, so I guess I should go back to checking it out.
     
  5. Feb 8, 2007 #5 of 16
    Camaro305

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    I assumed (wrongly I guess) that everything they showed was just upconverted stretched out 4:3 also. Go Rocky! :)
     
  6. Feb 8, 2007 #6 of 16
    Capmeister

    Capmeister Large Hairless ApeCutting Edge: ECHELON '08

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    Yeah, they sometimes do give actual 16:9... especially in more recent Law and Order shows and such. It's pretty easy to tell which you're getting.
     
  7. Feb 8, 2007 #7 of 16
    terryfoster

    terryfoster Godfather

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    You'll find their "new" additions (LOTR, Titanic, etc) to the channel are either widescreen made to fit 16:9 or OAR (see Titanic). I've been recording lots of movies from TNT-HD to see which ones come out unstretched.

    Maybe we need to start some kind of database to track which movies are unstretched. Maybe this database already exists somewhere?
     
  8. Feb 8, 2007 #8 of 16
    mtnagel

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    Are you saying that anamorphic (I think that's the terms) movies that would have bars on the top and bottom of a 16:9 tv are also altered to fit a 16:9 screen? Do they stretch it vertically or are they doing a pan and scan? If so, what is there obsession with making things fill the tv?
     
  9. Feb 8, 2007 #9 of 16
    terryfoster

    terryfoster Godfather

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    Yes, look at the LOTR movies TNT-HD airs. The OAR for LOTR moves is 2.35:1 and aspect ratio of the HD version TNT airs is 1.77:1 which is the ratio of a standard HDTV. Titanic is the only exception I can remember of that was letterboxed to the OAR.

    Now it is important to remember this may not be TNT's fault. They are provided a copy to air from the distributor and they may have little control over what is provided to them. You'll find all sorts of weirdness with this process. I watched The Matrix a long time ago and the DD5.1 mix was very different to the DVD version I've owned for years.

    While it may seem that TNT has this obsession of filling the TV, the real obsession of TV filling comes from J6P. Just think of the number of DVDs out there that are "Full Screen" rather than the OAR. At some point I predict there may be a third video format out there that provides a "Wide Full" picture to fill 16:9 HDTVs without distortion. Personally I think it's ridiculous but I have come to understand that I am in the minority when it comes to OAR.

    EDIT: The widescreen (non-stretched) movies TNT airs are not stretched vertically, but are put through a P&S style process. This is pretty much the same thing that is/was done to the movies that air on HBO (I haven't seen in a while, but HBO rarely provided movies in OAR).
     
  10. Camaro305

    Camaro305 Legend

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    I thought that was the point of anamorphic widescreen?
     
  11. terryfoster

    terryfoster Godfather

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    Yes and no. Simply put, anamorphic widescreen DVDs easily fill a 16:9 HDTV, but if the aspect ratio of the movie is wider than 1.77:1 then they must add some letterboxing. See: Wiki article


    The third version I'm envisioning would be essentially the format TNT provides when they're not stretching (see LOTR) where no letterboxing is employed. More or less a P&S of a 2.35:1 (or similar AR) movie to fill a 16:9 screen.

    Don't get me wrong, the idea makes me sick, but with the obvious obsession people have with filling their TVs and getting rid of the black bars it is inevitable.
     
  12. nocaster

    nocaster Legend

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    I've always assumed HD movies that are full 16:9 and not letterboxed were transferred to HD format using something similar to Pan-Scan...only not as much image is cropped as it would have been for 4:3.
     
  13. mtnagel

    mtnagel Hall Of Fame

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    Thanks for the info. Since the Groundhog's Day stretch-o-vision debacle, I haven't recorded anything off TNT HD, and I probably still won't. You don't think they have more control about what they get?

    And you mention J6P's obsession with filling the screen. What I think is funny is that they are going to get their 16:9 tv's (as everything moves to that) and they are going to pop in a "full screen" DVD and won't it be funny to see their reaction when there are black bars on the sides. Which they were trying to avoid by buying the P&S version for their 4:3 tv :D

    But of course, then they'll figure out how to stretch it horizontally, and all will be right again in their mind :rolleyes:

    I shutter at the thought.
     
  14. mtnagel

    mtnagel Hall Of Fame

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    I think you're a tad confused or maybe I'm just confused at your wording.

    Many movies today are shot in 16:9, so when they are displayed on a 16:9 tv, then there will be no black bars. Some movies are shot in 2.35:1 though and with those on a 16:9 tv, there will be black bars on the top and bottom. Or, which I didn't realize until this thread, they can pan and scan them to fill the 16:9 tv (which is bad!).

    More info can be found here.
     
  15. terryfoster

    terryfoster Godfather

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    They may be able to get more control over what format they receive but at a higher cost. So if the distributor doesn't see value in creating a HD 16:9 or OAR transfer, TNT would need to make a special order to get what they want. They probably have little incentive to reorder the movies they already have in their library in a 16:9 format and have decided to live with it. But as I said before most of their new to TNT movies are in at least 16:9.

    Me too, but they may decide to run out and either by the widescreen version or my 3rd alternative if that is ever developed which means more money for the studios.

    I remember talking someone out of buying the full screen version of a movie at a check out line. They realized as they were paying that they grabbed the wrong copy and the clerk offered to grab the right version. While the clerk was away I explained that maybe they should get the widescreen movie since they would probably get a new widescreen TV in the next couple years. They realized that it was highly likely they would soon get one of those new fan dangled HDTVs that everyone's talking about and they should go ahead and get the widescreen version.
     
  16. Kapeman

    Kapeman Godfather

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    Well, FWIW, I agree with you completely and have felt that way LONG before HD came on the scene.

    I talked to a video store employee a while back and they mentioned that they were no longer ordering fullscreen (4:3) versions of DVDs. Good for them.

    I always shudder when I hear someone complain about not wanting to see "those black bars".
     
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