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HR34 RVU Field Trial

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by harsh, May 18, 2011.

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  1. Jul 8, 2011 #721 of 864
    dsw2112

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    To be fair, it's a bit of a fallacy to argue that the current model provides a free DVR, but say the Allvid model would require a gateway that will have a cost associated. The provider would have the same opportunity to "provide" a gateway as part of their installation, as they did a DVR. I'm not saying that's what will happen, but it's not really fair to argue the point the way it was stated.

    I do believe that STB prices would fall dramatically in an open market system (as Tom stated.) So while they may not be free, they will have a price point much lower than what we see now. I think competition in the STB realm will help innovate, and reduce cost.

    BTW -- how'd this thread get sidetracked into discussing allvid :lol:
     
  2. Jul 9, 2011 #722 of 864
    Doug Brott

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    Hope you're not saying I said Allvid is bad. I don't know that it is. I just don't think it will work in the real world. By the time the Government puts this together and rams it down the MSOs throats TV as we know it will have already changed.
     
  3. Jul 9, 2011 #723 of 864
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Agreed.

    I also suspect the industry itself has a more sound approach (not to mention can execute it much quicker) than anyone in Wash DC.

    In the mean time, the HR34 sits and waits I suppose....with consumers outta luck.
     
  4. Jul 9, 2011 #724 of 864
    BattleScott

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    Yeah, no one moves faster and innovates quicker than the PayTV industry!!! :lol::lol::lol:
     
  5. Jul 9, 2011 #725 of 864
    CraigerCSM

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    Doesn't ATT have a type of AllVid already? They have their own Gateway that you hook their STB's into. They even allow the XBOX 360 to be an ATT STB.
     
  6. Jul 9, 2011 #726 of 864
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Teays...
    I agree, but people also don't want to have to pay $10-12/mo to get HD in the bedroom. As satellite subs, we are accustomed to having a "fee" on each additional location. A cable customer who was getting analog cable in the bedroom, but now has to pay a fee each month will not be happy.

    Enter a $199-299 box that he can own and will let him have HD in the bedroom. Less than a 2-3 year payback, he can take it with him when he moves and if he wants, a cool UI.
     
  7. Jul 9, 2011 #727 of 864
    CraigerCSM

    CraigerCSM Guest

    In a RVU system people would have to spend money on a client box also if they wanted to just have a PC, BluRay Player or Game System with RVU built in hooked to a TV without the HR-34.
     
  8. Jul 9, 2011 #728 of 864
    BattleScott

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    Kind of, but like RVU it falls well short of the goals of the AllVid proposal.

    If the gateway were an open technology allowing ANY box, or even the TV itself, to be a STB AND have the control over GUI elements and STB functionality, then it would be AllVid.
     
  9. Jul 9, 2011 #729 of 864
    JoeTheDragon

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    not the same and I think you pay the same the rent fee as with a ATT box I think about $7.

    + $99 hardware kit + $55 tech install + Xbox Live.

    the rent is a joke when you buy the Bell Fibe TV HD main box for $500 or rent for $20 and other boxes at each tv for $200 or rent for $5.

    telus is $15/mo rent or $250 to buy the main box and the box at each tv for $150.00 or rent for $5.

    xbox kit costs $50 on telus.

    Free installation applies to the first 2 digital boxes. Additional boxes installed will be subject to a $50 charge per box.


    I just want to move to the Canada system for hardware the where you can rent or buy with no mirroring costs.

    HD DRV SAT costs seem to be $399.99 - $499.00 and HD box are $99.99 - $199.00 and both systems give you a Credit on the first box.

    Now on cable it's all over the place makeing it hard to find the real cost (removing the locked to that system can end up lowing the price) and some systems have rent to own.

    shaw
    HD boxes are like $178 or $5 rent to own HD ready DVR (needs E-sata disk) $198 HD DVR with 1TB E-sata $298 or HD DVR 500GB $348 or $10 rent to own.

    SHAW GATEWAY (6 tuners) (500gb + E-sata) & TOTAL HOME PORTAL $598.00 or $17 rent to own
    and add more TOTAL HOME PORTALs for $178.00 or $5 rent to own each.

    rogers
    HD $319.99 or 12.95 rent HD DRV (160GB) $24.95 rent or $499 320GB $549 500gb $599

    cogeco
    HD box $199.99 or $10 rent HD DVR $499.99 or $18 rent
     
  10. Jul 9, 2011 #730 of 864
    Tom Robertson

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    Industry has a more sound approach which is called very expensive set top boxes, high rental and lease fees, and very closed architectures. Yup, it is sound for them. Very expensive for us.

    There is no motivation for the industry to compete on the set top box level, just as there was no reason for AT&T to compete on the handset level in the phone industry back in 1984.

    Um... the HR34 ain't sitting. You didn't notice it is in trials? :)

    For awhile, MSOs will have their house brand equipment. Things won't flip overnight. 100M customers won't change from business as old to business as AllVid immediately. :) But eventually MSOs will make their money on service--semi-monopoly services in the case of cable.

    And DVR (RVU server) companies will make their money on innovative hardware and innovative manufacturing.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  11. Jul 9, 2011 #731 of 864
    hdtvfan0001

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    I bet a government-imposed technology will cost more. It almost always does.

    It also noticed it isn't released... ;)
     
  12. Jul 9, 2011 #732 of 864
    Tom Robertson

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    Standardizing TV to NTSC and then ATSC was more expensive? Seems like by having standards you didn't have the Chicago TV system, the LA TV system, CBS method, etc. What we have here is a standardization to communicate.

    Standardizing to a single phone technology to and in the home didn't raise rates, equipment costs fell thru the floor. Competition dropped the prices of the services too. When was the last time you paid $1 per minute in long distance within the US... :)

    Having a standardized video standard will do the same thing.

    The key difference is the government is requiring a standard, not manufacturing the technology itself.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  13. Jul 9, 2011 #733 of 864
    hdtvfan0001

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    Well, it has been a year since the NoI (released April 21, 2010) and the FCC hasn't pushed the process any further. There is still a steady drip of filings at the FCC site from the concerned parties but no indication of when or if the FCC is going to move forward.

    The AllVid Tech Company Alliance has been quiet since its inception with only one filing since their original announcement.

    With no movement towards a NPR I don't see any way this can be pushed out before the end of 2012 as was originally proposed. There will be too much hardware and software development work required before gateway devices will be ready for deployment.

    I suspect they won't want the HR34 to wait another year+.
     
  14. Jul 9, 2011 #734 of 864
    Tom Robertson

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    Nope. The RVU client would be built into the TV, the PC, Bluray player, the game system, and the surround system. Since it's mostly software, the PC, bluray player, and the game system can be hooked up without even an upgrade to newer hardware.

    Look at the home networking industry. Sure, early on, you had to buy a network interface card for each device. But now TVs have them built in. AVRs have them. Smart phones can connect to your network. No one has to spend lots of money per device.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  15. Jul 9, 2011 #735 of 864
    Doug Brott

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    I agree with this .. if Allvid does take over, it becomes much less important for DIRECTV to have their own branded experience .. which leads to what? A decrease in DIRECTV's involvement in the middleware arena. I suppose they could build their own middleware which would (in theory) work on any platform, but a DIRECTV STB controlling a DISH Network or Comcast distribution just seems, well, highly unlikely.

    And having worked in a job that gave me access to the world of telecommunications over the years .. It really sucks when one vendor says "it's the other guy" and the other guy says the same thing. This is undoubtedly what will happen especially in the situation where crappy $25 DVR doesn't perform in a conducive way. Customer will still call DIRECTV (or Comcast, or DISH) because that is who they have service with. crappy DVR company will end up having crappy support and customer will long for the day where they could just watch TV and be happy.

    Yeah, Market forces will help weed out the good from the bad on both sides, but what will the end result really be? Will it be a happier consumer when you look at the big picture or will it be something else?

    If the FCC can't find a way to get the MSOs to buy in to Allvid .. it's doomed to failure. RVU is a convenient step back and will provide an incredibly large amount of Allvid's goals. Couple that with the fact that it is already in the roll out stage (Samsung, soon DIRECTV, etc.) Allvid hasn't gone much past conception yet.
     
  16. Jul 9, 2011 #736 of 864
    CraigerCSM

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    I know RVU would be built into PC's, BluRay and game systems. I read that RVU would be a chip not software. Is RVU software only is it mainly DNLA?
     
  17. Jul 9, 2011 #737 of 864
    Steve

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    Bingo, and a great analogy of what the FCC is hoping to achieve here, IMO. With average monthly TV subsriber programming costs approaching (or exceeding) $100, the MSO's would be wise to agree on standards sooner rather than later, to create economies of scale.
     
  18. Jul 9, 2011 #738 of 864
    Tom Robertson

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    HR34 is not AllVid. The HR34 is not a gateway. In fact, the HR34 is mostly the complete opposite of AllVid as it is not a gateway. DIRECTV can't wait for AllVid to develop their gateway devices. :)

    Now, I am concerned about the quiet about Allvid by the FCC. They need to act now for the reasons you mention. The 18 months it takes for consumer electronics manufacturers to spin up new equipment.

    That said, what does that have to do with the vision being more expensive than what we got now? :) To me the vision is very sound. Government is just being slow in getting the vision going.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  19. Jul 9, 2011 #739 of 864
    CraigerCSM

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    I think DTV should have made the HR-34 a wifi gateway unless that would make it IPTV? With adding Wifi that would be an easy way to hookup DTV's VOD.
     
  20. Jul 9, 2011 #740 of 864
    Tom Robertson

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    Perhaps I misunderstood your post?

    RVU requires generic hardware to work: CPU, networking, and video. Since PCs, Blu-rays, and game systems often have all the above they only need the software part. Easily added.

    TVs generally need all the hardware--which many new TVs have. The question is will TVs have enough CPU and GPU horsepower to decode the RVU signals correctly? Some will, some won't this year, but I expect they will next year. (Or the year after.) :)

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
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