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Hurricane Resistance

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by mikemyers, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. mikemyers

    mikemyers Legend

    234
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    May 19, 2010
    I did a search, but couldn't find any information.

    Can anyone tell me what strength DTV dishes and mounts are designed to withstand?

    I guess the answer could be in what category hurricane, but maybe a better answer would be what is the highest wind speed they are designed for?

    The tube mount is two inch diameter steel tubing, about 1/10" wall thickness, and it is held in place with four 5/16" bolts, which makes me think that even a "Hurricane Andrew" type of storm with winds up to 150mph wouldn't destroy it (although what it's mounted to would be another issue entirely).
     
  2. bigglebowski

    bigglebowski Legend

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    Jul 27, 2010
    Considering the damage to the rest of your property the dish would be the last thing I would worry about since its worth $100-150 retail.

    Even if it was rated to 160mph what would it be rated for your neighbors lawn chair traveling 60mph?
     
  3. mikemyers

    mikemyers Legend

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    May 19, 2010
    Thanks; I realize all that, but I've got to start somewhere.

    I'm sure it will survive 80mph winds.
    I doubt if it would survive 200mph winds.

    Other things (such as storm windows) have a design rating; I'm curious what it might be for these dishes and mounts.
     
  4. gov

    gov Legend

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    50
    Jan 11, 2013
    Attached a 5LNB D* to an exposed basement cement block wall. 5 anchors under the foot, and 2 under each of 2 monopoles. (Yeah, I'm the one guy that likes hammer drilling concrete.)


    Landscaping guy hit it with his Bobcat.


    LOL, not one anchor pulled out, but the dish was pretty flat up against the wall, didn't salvage any of it. Bobcat operator informed me he knew right away he had hit something, and was quite surprised it was a satellite dish. He told me 2 weeks earlier he had knocked a thru the wall HVAC off the side of a building and hadn't noticed it at all.

    Should have taken a picture for you, I get a real kick out the hall of shame entries, you'd have been proud of this one.


    As for the OP, ultimate wind speed for a 5 LNB with 2 monopoles secured to cement would be impressively high, over 150 I bet, the wooden part of the house would fail first.

    For some 5 LNBs stuck on to OSB and not a rafter, I'd say you'd be lucky to be still on the roof at 50.


    Had a commercial building with OSB on steel rafters. Couldn't attach to the rafters, so I used angle iron rails to attach mounting foot and monopoles. Was able to spread the forces out over a 12 inches and thru several lag bolts running the length of the angle pieces. It's held over 5 years in an exposed location. I realize D* regulars and subs can't do custom work like that, but I'm the independent guy that gets called for some hard jobs.
     
  5. bigglebowski

    bigglebowski Legend

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    Jul 27, 2010
    Sometimes there are times for a guy like him to NOT share a story like that.
     
  6. skyviewmark1

    skyviewmark1 Godfather

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    Sep 28, 2006
    During the hurricanes we have down here, The majority of Dish damage I had to deal with came from falling or flying objects hitting the dish. When left to itself the dish seemed to hold up against the wind itself, in most cases
     
  7. JeffBowser

    JeffBowser blah blah blah

    2,549
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    Dec 21, 2006
    I leave my dish in place up to tropical storm status. Once a Cat 1 or better hurricane is forecast, one of the last steps I take before I shut myself in is to remove the reflector. I leave the rest up. Once the wind passes, I put the reflector back on and away we go.
     
  8. n3ntj

    n3ntj Hall Of Fame

    5,773
    13
    Dec 18, 2006
    Lancaster,...
    I would think that the connection method of the dish to the home may fail before the dish failed, other than possibly the LNB possibly losing aim. A proper connection to a block wall would be superior than a typical roof installation.
     
  9. JeffBowser

    JeffBowser blah blah blah

    2,549
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    Dec 21, 2006
    Removing the reflector makes it a moot point. There's next to nothing for the wind to catch sans reflector. Of course that doesn't help wind-borne debris, but it beats dismantling totally and having to re-aim.
     
  10. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

    5,696
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    Nov 2, 2007
    NE FL
    Windows (and other products) have an advertised rating because Building Codes mandate that based on location, certain products have to meet/exceed specific wind speeds. But not even Broward/Dade building codes require dishes meet any type of wind speed rating. So you can easily find ratings for windows and doors, finding a dish rating will most likely be next to impossible.

    http://www.dca.state.fl.us/FBC/maps/Wind_borne_MAP_081208.pdf
     
  11. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    Feb 12, 2009
    NY Hudson...
    I think there a better chance of it getting hit by flying debris, then for it to become a flying saucer, without getting hit first.
     
  12. mikemyers

    mikemyers Legend

    234
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    May 19, 2010
    I agree; getting hit first is a very real possibility. There's only so much one can do for protection - buy good equipment, have it mounted correctly, and make sure of the strength of whatever you're mounting it to.

    Having seen the photos from Florida where wood-frame buildings vanished, leaving just a foundation and wreckage, I'm aware of how nasty things can be. I've been through three hurricanes in Miami, and one in India. Terrifying.

    Then there was Sandy......

    Maybe you guys are right, and I'm asking the wrong questions. There is no simple answer, and at some point, the answer might be to ignore everything and get the heck away from where the hurricane is going to hit, and hope for the best......
     
  13. goinsleeper

    goinsleeper Godfather

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    May 22, 2012
    It would be very difficult to narrow down what wind speed it would be rated at based on the angle the wind is hitting the dish and how the dish is installed compared to the direction of the storm and possibly even the pitch of the roof(assuming it's mounted to the roof of course). It's a good question but I believe there are too many variables to set a definite number to it.
     
  14. mikemyers

    mikemyers Legend

    234
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    May 19, 2010
    That part I can deal with - just assume the worst case scenario, with water-driven wind hitting the dish head on, with a speed of 140mph, with the dish mounted on a four foot high vertical post. You're right - too many variables, so why not take the worst case scenario? (Worse yet would be if something solid were to hit the dish, in which case it all depends on the size, weight, and speed of the object, so maybe we take a ten pound object being driven by the wind and rain.....

    Or, picture a US Navy ship with a communications satellite mounted topside. Someone must go through some kind of calculations to make it most likely that the device would survive a bad storm.

    I think this is all way too complicated for this discussion though. Common sense (and past experience) tells me that the two inch diameter (1/10" wall thickness) steel tubing used by DTV, and a mounting height of three to four feet, should survive varying 150 mph winds for an hour or two, provided it was properly anchored in place to something "solid".
     
  15. JeffBowser

    JeffBowser blah blah blah

    2,549
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    Dec 21, 2006
    Guys, take the reflector off. I have gotten through every storm that has passed through south Florida post Andrew simply by removing the windsail. The likelihood of airborne debris taking a bulls-eye at the leftover mount and LNB arm is pretty small, and its cross section is too small to be affected by the wind.
     
  16. 1980ws

    1980ws Legend

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    Mar 18, 2008
    Longwood,...
    Never thought of doing this. Haven't had a Hurricane through here since I got a dish. Good tip. Thanks.
     
  17. mikemyers

    mikemyers Legend

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    May 19, 2010
    Thanks! That sounds like a good plan, once I've got things set up again, which should be tomorrow morning.

    I suppose if I leave town for a few months, as I visit India, maybe I should do this before leaving, just in case. ...good thinking!
     
  18. jmpfaff

    jmpfaff AllStar

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    Dec 12, 2004
    Realizing I'm a day late on this thread....my concern has never been the dish itself, it's the dish getting caught in the wind and taking the plywood off the roof. (Perhaps I give the installers too much credit for their mounting abilities)

    I took the reflector off for Ike. Hoping this concern doesn't raise itself again in SE Texas for several more years.
     
  19. TANK

    TANK Icon DBSTalk Club

    910
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    Feb 16, 2003
    FLORIDA
    I have mine pole mounted ,cemented in the ground.

    I worry more about the trees in the area being uprooted before the dish gets blown away.
     
  20. mikemyers

    mikemyers Legend

    234
    1
    May 19, 2010
    I wish I had that option..... I'm trying to think of something big enough, and heavy enough, that I can put it out on my balcony and attach the satellite mount to it. So far I haven't come up with any ideas that sound workable.

    My brother has something like what you describe - he had a hole dug, put in the DTV steel post, and had it cemented in place. Absolutely solid! I'm guessing the pole goes at least a foot, maybe more, into the concrete filled hole?
     

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