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I have no idea what my physical/Street address is.

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Inkosaurus, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. jdskycaster

    jdskycaster Legend

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    If you have a child in Kindergarten ask him. It is one of the first things they are required to know when entering school.
     
  2. TBlazer07

    TBlazer07 Grumpy Grampy

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    Or on Amazon.com as a delivery address! :lol:
     
  3. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    True! However, it is Mom and Dad's (or an adult in their household) to teach them what it is..
     
  4. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    You're welcome. :sure:
     
  5. jadebox

    jadebox Godfather

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    This thread reminded me of something. You've probably heard of the old game of creating your "porno name" by combining your first pet's name with the name of the first street you lived on. In my case the name would be "Snuffy Rural Route 57B." :)

    Note: BTW ... that old game can be used a a part of a "phising scheme" to get answers to security questions such as used by bank web sites. So, the "porn name" I used above is not exactly right. Be very suspicious if someone suggests a similar game using your mother's maiden name and the last four digits of your social security number! :)

    -- Roger
     
  6. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    The place I used to work at had a PO box in a nearby town called Bound Brook. The plant was not close to Bound Brook, it was in Piscataway and Middlesex Boro. But we were (and still are in the quarterly newsletter I still get) 1 River Road, Bound Brook. Just before I quit, I finally found the correct address, but I had to go to Piscataway's town hall to find it.

    Rich
     
  7. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    There are towns with no delivery. Everyone in town is a PO Box. The post office doesn't care where people in those towns live. :)
     
  8. longrider

    longrider Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I live next to one of those towns and while the Post Office may not care i can tell you that every house or business has a street address. Everything must be locatable...
     
  9. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Wait a minute... I never had a porno name. What have I been missing? :confused:
     
  10. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Deeds in most areas don't contemplate street addresses because street names change. Instead they are described by survey information in terms of township, range, section, angles and chains (or feet).

    See more at Public Land Survey System.
     
  11. jerry downing

    jerry downing Godfather

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    Due to a surveying SNAFU, the house numbers on my block are not in numerical order. I have had to show delivery people where their customer's house was.
     
  12. Upstream

    Upstream Hall Of Fame

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    Right. Because it is much easier to tell someone that you are at "40.556738,-74.527017" than to tell them you are at "28 Main Street in South Bound Brook"
     
  13. Upstream

    Upstream Hall Of Fame

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    Did you work at Union Carbide? Do you glow in the dark?
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I did. Long time.

    I don't think so....:lol:

    Rich
     
  15. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Who officially assigns numbering to the developments? I ask because I have seen a variety of systems used

    Two of the most interesting includes, As you drive in the development, houses to the right of entrance road start with 1xx while homes to the left start with 2xx (making it possible for 101 and 201 to be next to each other)
    Homes around the perimeter of development start with 1xx while homes on cross streets inside the perimeter are consecutive (street 'A' starts with 2xx while street 'B' starts with 3xx, etc. )
     
  16. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I live on a court with five houses on it. No logical reason for the way the houses are numbered. Four is next to 6 which is next to 3 and so on.

    Rich
     
  17. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I am happy to live in an area that generally uses the grid system. Every mile is 1000 numbers, odd on one side, even on the other. A country address such as 510 N 300 E isn't too hard to find. Or 20665 CR 2 in another county. Another county uses alphabetized roads but there are too many new roads between the old to keep the alphabetization working. But the house numbers are consistent.

    In the cities it can get strange but I have not seen too many houses numbered out of order.
     
  18. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salt Lake City uses a spoke pattern for their street system.

    The problem with these localized systems is that they don't work particularly well if you're "not from around here".

    How do you figure out which roads will get you to an address in the grid system? I'm trying to imagine how you would ask for or give directions to a point on a grid. If the roads aren't straight, might you traverse the right N or E on the way to your destination?

    The milepost system may be easier to grok and something that you can check against your odometer.
     
  19. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    We use a grid addressing system in Mendocino County outside the cities. The numbers reflect the "predominant" direction of the street - is it more east-west or more north-south?

    Here's a Google Earth View of the streets in my neighborhood:

    [​IMG]

    I have no idea how they decided which streets were what, but they did it.
     
  20. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Angled roads are a challenge to any system but I've found most cities easy to navigate once the pattern is revealed.

    Most cities have a center ... a zero point defined by two lines. One line is street where all addresses north of that point on north-south roads are "North" and all addresses south of that point on north-south roads are "South". The other line is a street that divides "East" from "West".

    Drive west looking at house numbers ... if you see them count down you are heading toward the center line. If you are looking for 407 West Smith Street and you just passed houses numbered 516, 514, 512 westbound on Smith Street you have about eight blocks to go. If you don't know where Smith Street is this could be a bigger challenge, but I have found such addresses by driving west to whatever road "400" is then driving north or south along that road until the cross street is found. It doesn't always work (thanks to incomplete streets and interruptions such as parks, expressways, railroads and rivers) but on a grid system there is a chance.

    Grid systems are based on some scale ... normally 100 per block or 1000 per mile. With a little observation it should not be hard to figure out how to get to a particular number on the grid.

    Mountain and lakeside roads ... all bets are off, especially where there are loops. Dead ends help (as the number does not have to meet up with the next road crossed) but one really has to pick a scale and go with it to allow for future changes.

    One of my wife's rural childhood addresses changed three times in three years as the post office and the sheriff fought over creating a logical numbering system. Getting it right the first time is important.
     

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