Interviewing with multiple companies at the same time

Discussion in 'The OT' started by SledgeHammer, Oct 5, 2020.

  1. Oct 5, 2020 #1 of 17
    SledgeHammer

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    I've been looking for a new job for quite a while now (I do have a job, but the comp is waaaayyyy below market and lots of other issues, so I'm finally doing something about it).

    Right now I've got 4 companies on the hook:

    Company A: Had the HR screen on Friday and it went very well, supposedly will get a tech screen this week. Full time.
    Company B: Going through a recruiter agency, so took a test for the agency. Took ANOTHER test for the company on Friday. Got an email this morning about a phone interview tomorrow with the hiring manager. 1 yr contract to hire.
    Company C: Also had the HR screen on Friday. Supposed to hear about next steps this week as well. Full time.
    Company D: Have the HR screen later today. Full time.

    So...

    A is a software company, if you aren't a software engineer, you probably never heard of them... they are the leader in their space though and their stock is doing awesome and major hiring spree.
    B is also a software company. You've definitely heard of them and their software.
    C is a software/ecommerce company you've never heard of. Kind of has a bad rep on glass door. I know 2 people that went there and quit within 1 - 2 yrs. Had a recruiter claim they were trying to improve, but...
    D is also a software company you never heard of. Kind of skeptical on this one since they don't seem to make much money based on how many employees they have.

    C & D, I'm not too excited about and applied to them as "last resorts" to get out of my current company.

    So anyways... the question is what have you guys done in the past in situations like A&B? A's benefits aren't that great. No 401k matching and "unlimited PTO", but its full time and 2 levels above B and the stock options will be a lot better I think. Not sure if B gives stock options and not positive on what % bonus or stock options either company pays. At a rough estimate based on what I could find online BEFORE you count stock options, A will probably be ~40k more. So they more then cover the crappier benefits. Both will be perm remote which kind of sucks, but I don't think we're going back to the offices in January lol... looking more like mid 2021.

    I mean, its a no brainer, I'll make more money at A most likely. I'd be happy at either. My concern is that B might move fast since its contract to hire. Of course I can take B and retract during my 2 week notice period if A comes along... but once you start... if you quit a job after a week or two, you are burned with the company and the agency...

    Not too concerned about getting burned at C&D since I did those on my own and being burned there, I wouldn't lose sleep over it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2020
  2. Oct 5, 2020 #2 of 17
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Never discount the value of a good benefits package. Health insurance and an FSA may well be the deciding factors in my next job.
     
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  3. Oct 5, 2020 #3 of 17
    steve053

    steve053 Godfather

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    Interview with companies C & D as though they are companies A &B. Practice, practice, and more practice will help when interviewing for the role you really want. I've made some stupid interviewing mistakes, one of which I'm certain cost me the job.

    In my current job I am required to give 4 weeks notice in order to be considered for rehire. If offered job B before knowing job A's interest, can push out your start date as far as possible. Are there projects you are leading that need to be wrapped up, people to be trained, or documentation that needs completing?

    I don't know what you mean by "A's benefits aren't that great". I think @harsh is thinking that the health insurance benefits aren't comparable. My experience is that you don't see that level of coverage information much before the offer, so I'm guessing you're talking about pay, paid time off, and retirement plans. Only you can decide which has more value to you.

    You might want to consider your next job. Does being on the inside of either company make you desirable to companies that use/interface with their product? Tuition reimbursement? Opportunities for advancement?
     
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  4. Oct 5, 2020 #4 of 17
    SledgeHammer

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    Yeah, I put together a spreadsheet with the known benefits. Both companies have their regular benefits on a public site. The bonus and stock options are not clear at either company since that depends on your level. I know what the base salary would be at B and I went in the middle of the range on A.

    At the end of the day, I itemize every benefit (that I'll use) and $$$, stock options, bonus, etc. and look at the total package. You can't always go by the headline numbers.
     
  5. Oct 5, 2020 #5 of 17
    SledgeHammer

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    Yup. I've made some REALLY stupid mistakes while interviewing. Was interviewing at this one company I really wanted to get in and it was pretty much a done deal, I aced all the rounds. I just had to meet with the big boss and he asked me a question, which I gave an answer, but it kind of came across smart assy. It was more meant as slightly humorous. The direct boss took it like that and laughed. The big boss thought it was kind of smart assy. I don't know if that's what cost me the job, but I doubt it helped.

    Nah, just 2 weeks. I wouldn't go back there. That's why I'm leaving :). REALLY crappy pay... any other company at my same title, I can get probably about 50% more. B is at the same title. A is 2 levels higher.

    Yeah, my OP was really about how to stall B while waiting to see what happens with A. I don't want to piss B off and I'm not going to wait for A forever.

    I'm in charge of some big projects at my current place... but yet, company won't pay me market or anywhere near it. All top of the class reviews and the strongest technical person. It's just a low ball place. I dunno. Everybody there is low balled. I went to talk with my boss about it last year and he sat there lying to my face for an hour. Literally every word out of his mouth was a lie. I called him out a few times, but then just gave up and wanted the meeting to be over. Not going to waste my time on that nonsense.

    * Health benefits are a wash. I think B has better / cheaper health coverage. But either way, we're talking about maybe $50 to $150 a month diff. Not a big deal.
    * A has "unlimited PTO", B has 3 weeks paid + a cash out option, after 2 yrs, B moves up to 4 weeks. They have a few higher tiers as well. Personally, I'd rather have PTO. The unlimited PTO is a scam imo. Especially for people like me who don't use a lot of vacation.
    * A has no 401k matching, B matches up to a $10k limit (i.e. they follow the match rule, but if they "should" be putting in 12k for example, they'll stop after $10k. That $10k cap is just on the company contribution side.
    * A is full time now, B is full time after 1 year as a contractor (and they don't necessarily need to convert you or can stretch it out -- that's what happened at my current company. They stretched out a 1 yr C2H to 3 yrs. That's part of why my salary is so low now.
    * A will pay for my cell AND internet service ($140/mo total)

    Really, at the end of the day... who cares where the money comes from? If B saves me $2000 on health coverage vs. A, but A's total package is $50k more...

    Hmm... I'd say nobody would care if they saw C or D on my resume. Nobody would have heard of them. Everybody has heard of B whether they are in the industry or not. I'd say in software engineering, you PROBABLY heard of A if you are close-ish to that part of the software engineering job... but its not a household name like B is. Its no Google or Amazon or Microsoft. Still they are benefiting a lot from stay at home. The stock has doubled over the past 6 months.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2020
  6. Oct 5, 2020 #6 of 17
    SledgeHammer

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    Hmm... I just had my HR screen with company D. I think I'm going to walk away from that one. Started in 2007-08, currently has 500 employees world wide and revenue in the neighborhood of $100M. Yikes.

    A has a market cap of $30B, not profitable yet it looks like
    B has a market cap of $86B, profitable
    C is private as well... but they have sales in the billions
     
  7. Oct 5, 2020 #7 of 17
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Sometimes this means that the company carries a lot less baggage and can be more flexible.
     
  8. Oct 5, 2020 #8 of 17
    SledgeHammer

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    $100M revenue on 500 employees sounds very low to me, and they are in a niche market (medical billing). They were willing to meet my salary & bonus expectations, but it didn't sound like they would be going public any time soon, so no stock options. I dunno, I feel if they are making that little money, they are susceptible to the economic damage from corona.
     
  9. Oct 7, 2020 #9 of 17
    phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    If you're looking for some semblance of security over the next five years, medical billing is not my idea of a secure American business. Funding of medical costs is way too political at this point in time in my view.
     
  10. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Medical billing is a decent industry and it has been growing. Regardless of who is paying (individuals, private insurance, government programs) hospitals and other health care providers have found that they need to make sure every procedure, every item used, every effort gets billed. They cannot work for free. Medical billing makes sure that the health care providers get paid for services rendered.
     
  11. SledgeHammer

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    My parents friends started a medical billing company. The dad originally wrote the software. Now the kids help run it. Small family business and they make more money then they know what to do with. They don't have, or need 500 employees. I don't think they make $100M a year lol, but the parents have multiple giant houses and the kids have giant houses. And expensive cars all around.
     
  12. SledgeHammer

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    I rejected D. C is wanting to do a video chat. But I've heard from like 3 people now that I shouldn't go there lol.

    Had a weird 2nd round with B yesterday. They had a mid level guy interview me... by himself... and that was his first ever interview. So it was just discussing my experience, no technical questions or programming. THANK GOD! So sick of interviewing! There was one potential hiccup on the tech stack... and the guy warned me that this team works a lot. Like 10 - 12 hours and weekends lol. At an established, well known company? I asked the recruiter about both items after the call... haven't gotten a call back from her. She also thought it was weird that they didn't ask me anything technical. Apparently somebody else from this same recruiter got sent in and they got technical questions.

    I'm not too keen on 10 - 12 hour days. I mean, I get my work done, often ahead of schedule and I sometimes logon outside of regular hours AT MY LEISURE. And there is a night time deployment twice a month and sometimes I get called for a system outage, but that's pretty rare now since my stuff is pretty stable. I'm too old to commit to 60 hour weeks lol. Even when I was 20 I wouldn't do 60 hour weeks for "normal pay". Why would anybody do that?

    But I'm guessing if I haven't heard back from the recruiter yet its a no go for some reason.

    Now there's a company E. They want me to take a 1 hr programming test as a FIRST step before I even talk to anybody. Uh... I'll ask to set up a 15 min chat with the recruiter first and we'll see how that goes over.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2020
  13. tenpins

    tenpins AllStar

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    Sorry to hear about your potential job opportunities disappearing. it does sounds like what happened to me with stock options at my prior employer. While options are nice, sometimes outside factors can make that piece of paper worth just that. What affected me was the market crash/ recession of '08. Took a long period of time to reach the break even point on the options, eventually cashed them in and then Uncle Sam was wanting his percentage.
     
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  14. SledgeHammer

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    Yup. Same here. Around 2000 I joined a company... maybe a startup+. I seem to remember I amassed like 10k shares at 10c each. Or maybe it was 17k. Everybody there was super enthusiastic and hung out together, etc. The CEO was an idiot that was looting the company. Also super greedy. A big tech company came out to buy us, but he wanted 10x what they were offering, so they walked away. The board eventually pushed him out and sold the company for I think 10M or so. I was long laid off, so my options were vacated for me lol. I don't think anybody made any money. I found out recently that the majority of the people that used to work there formed a new start up. Everybody from the original company has crazy high titles. Like this one guy that was a jr developer in the original company is like a Sr. Director at the new company lol.

    At the time, I was hopeful those stock options would pan out but because the CEO was looting the company, they had so many rounds of funding and gave out so many shares, it would be hard pressed to have been worth much.
     
  15. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    It sounds like you're weighing things in a way that makes sense for you. The only two cents I can really add it... I look at things differently depending on my situation.

    A. I am happy at my job.
    B. I am unhappy at my job.
    C. I don't have a job.

    With C, you sometimes have to take the offer at whatever place comes back to you first because anything is better than nothing... but if you can extend the start time to allow for the possibility of the "better" opportunity then that's worth exploring. I agree that I don't like the scenario of accepting an offer and then backing out or actually starting/quitting to take a better offer. It can be understandable and explained... but it's awkward and I like to avoid that.

    With B, which sounds like where you are at, you don't just have to take any offer (like scenario C) but you might jump quicker just to get away from where you are now, depending on how bad that is.

    With A, you are in the catbird seat... no need to jump unless all your expectations are met. I'd much prefer to be in scenario A... I've been there before... and it makes the jump much easier when you finally find that new job. Also, it probably helps subconsciously boost how you are perceived in interviews because people can kind of pick up on B/C scenarios and try to low ball you. In scenario A, you can take it or leave it and sometimes that lets you get some cool perks in an offer.
     
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  16. billsharpe

    billsharpe Hall Of Fame

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    I've been in position A and C. First one, I was happy with the job but told the position was being eliminated and I should look elsewhere. I did and got a new job with no problems.

    Second one, I was laid off with two weeks notice. I could not find another job quickly but after four months I found a great job, spent 17 1/2 years there and retired early at age 59. That was a tough four months, though.
     
  17. SledgeHammer

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    Regarding pulling an acceptance... I guess it depends on the company. I definitely don't go out with the intention of doing that, but if I accept an offer and then in a week or two somebody offers me an extra $50k or whatever, who wouldn't take that?

    I used to work with this guy who hops jobs like mad. He never gives notice no matter how long he's been there. He always seems to find a better job lol. He quit Google after 5 months to go to Amazon.

    Then again, companies don't see anything wrong with stringing you along for 3 - 4 months during the interview process, so...

    Yeah, I'm at B. But not "enough B" to walk off. That's just dumb in any situation. When people ask why I'm looking, I just say "I've been here for a long time, I'm just looking for a change" and they don't dig further. I've gotten offers. A few low ball ones, and a few good ones and one great one that came with too many strings attached, so I passed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020

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