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Is D* Using Our Boxes for Signal Testing?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by aramus8, Sep 13, 2007.

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  1. ShiningBengal

    ShiningBengal Godfather

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    Can you quote the language in my post that discusses the difference between 102.6 and 102.8? I did no such thing.

    Sorry my post was too simplistic and incomplete for you. Perhaps that was because, as you previously stated, the subject had already been discussed to death in another thread. Were your posts among those that discussed the matter to death in that thread?

    I didn't need you to spell out what I already knew and understood full well. But if it makes you feel better, let me congratulate you on the depth of your understanding of geophysics. I yield to your obvious credentials. Can we now put a period on this interchange?:)
     
  2. LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    You stated:

    The dish "expects" no such thing. The LNB is positioned and optimized to receive a signal from approximately 103 W when properly peaked. The difference between 102.6 and 102.8 (actually 102.775 per the FCC grant of authority a few weeks ago) is minuscule. Your post implied (wrongly) otherwise.

    Don't post inaccurate information.

    If you had read any of that thread, you'd already know the answer to that question. It was "stickied" to the top of this section since the first week of July and had nearly 300,000 views. Too bad you missed it. :)

    Your post indicated no such knowledge or understanding.

    Try "orbital mechanics, spacecraft engineering, and spacecraft operations" and you'd be right. But again, you're not. :) And it's not about making me feel better, it's about providing accurate information for people who don't know better.

    I've said nothing about my credentials in this thread.

    Sure.
     
  3. mluntz

    mluntz Icon

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    I believe if you don't hit the "Interrupt Now" button, you will return to programming with no issues.

    If you do interrupt, you will have to restart your reciever.
     
  4. Supervolcano

    Supervolcano Hall Of Fame

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    Guys, the "live tv conflict" is a software bug.
    Nothing more, nothing less.

    It's been happening to people ever since the release of the HR20-700's 0x18a software (and every CE version since) in August.

    Sometimes you can get out of it with a channel change, sometimes you can't.
    If you can't, then do a menu reset to fix problem.
     
  5. Supervolcano

    Supervolcano Hall Of Fame

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    Not always.

    I selected "no, don't interrupt" this morning and still had to reboot to enable channel changing again.
     
  6. ShiningBengal

    ShiningBengal Godfather

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    Of course it's "minuscule." There's a lot of "space" out there. But DirecTV is moving DirecTV 10 from a temporary location to a permanent one approximately 0.2 degrees away, nonetheless. There is a reason, or they wouldn't have needed to do so. My meaning (I thought it clear from the word "expects" is that the dish is engineered to receive signal from all its satellites at their permanent locations.

    The LNB's are positioned on the 5-LNB dish assembly to peak signal at those locations. Will the dish receive a signal from a location at approximately 103 degrees? I would be surprised if it didn't. But on the 5 LNB dishes there is a different LNB for 101 than there is for 103, so we know that 101 is not optimal for receiving signal from a bird at 103. The distance between them on the mounting assembly is around 4-5 inches. That distance takes those 2 degrees into consideration. 0.2 degrees is 1/10th that distance. Simple arithmetic tells us that 2 tenths of a degree relates to about 1/2 an inch on the LNB mount. It seems to me from aiming about a dozen Dish and DirecTV dishes that this is enough to make a noticeable difference in signal strength. Do you suggest otherwise?

    The new 5 LNB dishes have much more precise alignment adjustment features than the older 3 LNB dishes had, and alignment must be more precise to optimize reception than it was in older dishes. It seems obvious that the "minuscule" distances we are talking about are not as trivial as you seem to be suggesting with your choice of adjectives.
     
  7. Supervolcano

    Supervolcano Hall Of Fame

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    Incorrect.
    There's 3 lnb's on a 5 lnb dish.
    One for 119
    One for 110
    One for 99/101/103 combined
    :rolleyes:
     
  8. oakwcj

    oakwcj Lower Echelon

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    The difference is not between the testing location of 102.6 and the previously requested permanent position of 102.8. It's the difference between 102.8 and the temporary authorized operation location of 102.775. That difference is really minimal. The move is over. There was never any intention that our dishes would be able to receive the signal at 102.6. The sat was parked there for a few weeks solely for testing purposes. If you had even casually followed the TECH thread, none of this would be news to you.
     
  9. LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    I thought this part of the conversation was over? I guess not. :)

    Supervolcano and oakwcj are correct.
     
  10. ShiningBengal

    ShiningBengal Godfather

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    The distance between the testing location and the permanent location is what I was referring to. That distance is roughly 0.2. I never mentioned the 102.775 location. Of course I would agree that the difference between 102.775 and 102.800 is only 0.025. But I was referring to a 0.200 difference. I thought I was clear on that.

    I knew that 103.6 was the testing location only, and I referred to that fact in another post. Do a search on my posts and you will find it.
     
  11. ShiningBengal

    ShiningBengal Godfather

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    Thank you for correcting my misapprehension. That makes perfect sense. Pass the crow?:D
     
  12. LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    And has been pointed out to you, 0.2 degrees is insignificant - it represents a difference of a bit over 90 miles along the circumference of a GSO orbital path, and a very tiny fraction of a degree in azimuth change from one to the next, so small that it essentially doesn't matter.
     
  13. wingrider01

    wingrider01 Hall Of Fame

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    samr thing happened here, but was able to reset it through the gui and did not have to do a rbr
     
  14. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    Just a small point on this thread. Most likely it isn't your receiver...it's DirecTV's receiver and if I remember the lease/service agreement they have the right to poll it for data either personal, or non-identifiable depending on your selection (Wanna guess what it defaults to?).
     
  15. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

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    Only 61 markets get HD locals. So probably the majority of customers do not
    receive a spotbeam from 99 or 103. I do not.

    So it does not necessarily follow that most of our dishes were peaked for 103 at install time. If they were, there would probably not be so many people reporting signals in the 40-70 range on this forum. The low-signal posts from yesterday indicate some issue at those locations about which D* will be called. It makes sense that D* would like to get a handle on the number before the calls begin.

    Of course it is D*s issue as to alignment. The customer does not call the contractor with a problem, he calls D*, and D* takes care of it.
     
  16. oakwcj

    oakwcj Lower Echelon

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    Don't those 61 markets cover more than 90% of U.S. households?
     
  17. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

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    I don't know, but I'm sure they do not cover 90% of the US surface area.

    I don't have any special knowledge as to whether D* is testing with our boxes or not. However, it makes sense that D* would like to know the approximate percentage of customers who are receiving a good signal from the new satellite, as well as if it is being received in all geographic areas. Not only could they get a rough signal test in this manner, but they could anticipate the amount of calls they might get when the new channels go live.

    Now as to whether D* is really using our recievers to transmit that data, I'm only saying it is possible and would make sense.:)
     
  18. I WANT MORE

    I WANT MORE CowboySooner

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    !danger: I would bail out now. You are in over your head. !danger:
     
  19. Coffey77

    Coffey77 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    I imagine they can. I'm sure it's got a few positioning thrusters.
     
  20. Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    Right. It has an orbital slot and it, like all satellites, will make minor adjustments to keep from drifting out of that slot. A satellite becomes unusable when it expends all its fuel and drifts out of its slot.
     
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