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James J. Kilpatrick

Discussion in 'The OT' started by AntAltMike, Aug 16, 2010.

  1. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    By Associated Press

    He was my sister's father-in-law for about a decade. He claimed that he had never seen any of the Dan Akroyd parodies of himself, and I don't believe that he realized that his resurgence as a guest speaker, particularly addressing college-aged audiences in the 1980s and early 1990s, was fueled by that notoriety. In a related vein, I sometimes wonder if William F Buckley had any idea how obscure he himself would have been to most of the public if David Frye had not imitated him so often and so well on the Ed Sullivan Show.

    Kilpatrick was offered a part in an Airplane sequel in which he would have basically parodied himself, boisterously butting into some other passengers conversation, maybe like Marshall McLuhan did in Annie Hall, but he was not interested. Little did he realize that if he had, his exposure to another generation would have been worth hundreds of thousands of dollars to himself in future earnings.
     
  2. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/po...-kilpatrick-conservativ.html?wprss=postmortem
    From: The Washington Post

    James J. Kilpatrick, conservative columnist, dies at 89


    By Adam Bernstein
    Monday, August 16, 2010; 11:44 AM

    James J. Kilpatrick, 89, a fiery advocate of racial segregation as a Richmond newspaper editor in the 1950s who became a sparring partner of liberals on the television show "60 Minutes" and a syndicated columnist who offered conservative views on subjects ranging from politics to proper use of the English language, died Aug. 15 at George Washington University hospital. He had congestive heart failure.

    Mr. Kilpatrick, who gradually distanced himself from his writings on race, became one of the most popular and eminent conservative writers of his generation. His prose blended the erudite and the homespun, and he became one of the few conservatives syndicated in print nationally in the early 1960s. His column "A Conservative View" ran in hundreds of newspapers for nearly 30 years and initially predated the television presence of William F. Buckley Jr., founder of the conservative National Review magazine.

    "Before there was a Bill Buckley, before there was a Ronald Reagan or Rush Limbaugh, there was James Jackson Kilpatrick explaining public-policy issues from a conservative perspective," said Richard Viguerie, a conservative youth group leader in the early 1960s who became a direct-mail pioneer for conservative political candidates.

    Larry J. Sabato, a political science professor at the University of Virginia, said Mr. Kilpatrick's accomplishments will always be overshadowed by the major role he played as top editor of the Richmond News Leader. At the now-defunct paper, Mr. Kilpatrick wrote editorials that thundered support for "massive resistance" to race-mixing in public schools, an effort pushed by the political machine of then-U.S. Sen. Harry F. Byrd Sr. and which worked to shut down public schools rather than integrate.

    "It was one of the saddest episodes in Virginia's long history, and it helped to keep the state a backwater for years to come," Sabato said.

    Mr. Kilpatrick rose to national prominence at the Richmond paper. In books, essays and editorials, he was known for clothing segregationist doctrine in the terms of constitutional argument. For example, he gave new life to the idea of interposition, once championed by pre-Civil War Sen. John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, who argued that states could protect their citizens from the authority of the federal government. Many Southern states began to pass pro-segregation laws that adopted the interposition language promoted by Mr. Kilpatrick.

    One of Mr. Kilpatrick's most strident essays on civil rights, titled "The Hell He Is Equal," was scheduled for publication in the Saturday Evening Post in late 1963. But editors pulled the essay because of the Birmingham, Ala., church bombing that September, which claimed the lives of four black girls during services at the church.

    "Kilpatrick, by propagating a whole vernacular to serve the culture of massive resistance -- interposition, nullification, states' rights, state sovereignty -- provided an intellectual shield for nearly every racist action and reaction in the coming years," Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff wrote in "The Race Beat" (2006), their Pulitzer Prize-winning book about journalism in the civil rights era...


    His stature as a writer, lecturer and commentator on public-affairs shows led to his appearances on the "60 Minutes" segment "Point-Counterpoint" in the 1970s. On the program, Mr. Kilpatrick debated such policy issues as family planning and the Vietnam War against liberal authors Nicholas von Hoffman and later Shana Alexander.

    "If ever I heard an oversimplified fairy tale of the last years in Vietnam, I just heard one from you," Mr. Kilpatrick said in one exchange. They peppered their remarks with "Oh, come on, Jack" and "Now see here, Shana" and helped make possible even-more combative talk shows, including "Crossfire."

    "Point-Counterpoint" was memorably parodied on "Saturday Night Live" with Dan Aykroyd and Jane Curtin in the roles. "Jane, you ignorant slut," became a national catchphrase uttered by Aykroyd's character; "Dan, you pompous ass," was Curtin's retort.
     
  3. wilbur_the_goose

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    Funny how the conservative movement has changed since then. They argue for states' rights - unless they want to promote a national agenda (gay marriage, for example).

    Strangely, the liberals follow the exact opposite path (gun rights, for example), which ultimately results in a vanilla sort of nothingness where nothing good seems to happen.

    Tweedle-dee/Tweedle-dum.
     
  4. dettxw

    dettxw MRVing

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    Hmm...

    Looks like he was born and raised in these parts where I now reside. Here's a write-up from The Daily Oklahoman.

    I always wondered (but I guess not enough to find out) why we had a Kilpatrick Turnpike and Kilpatrick Center Museums.
     
  5. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

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    I'm in my 50s and I didn't know who he was.
     
  6. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    I'm pretty sure that the interval of Jane Curtain/Dan Akroyd parody overlapped Kilpatrick's "Point - Counterpoint" series. Did you see Saturday Night Live in the 1970s, and if you did, were you unaware that what you were watching was a parody of a contemporary 60 Minutes segment?
     
  7. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Remember that quite well.
     
  8. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    One of the most famous SNL lines ever and outrageous for the times was Akroyd's "Jane, you ignorant slut!"

    R.I.P. Kilpatrick
     
  9. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

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    Until I read this post I didn't even know which sketches we were talking about.

    It's extremely unlikely that I never saw them on 60 Minutes but it must have not been often enough to make much of an impression on me.
     
  10. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    "Dan, you pompous ass," was Curtin's retort.
     
  11. wilbur_the_goose

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    We need more people like James J. today. Made his points without making the other side the devil. RIP, James J.
     

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