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Keep an eye on your bills for major increases

Discussion in 'The OT' started by jimmie57, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. Jun 7, 2018 #1 of 16
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    I have been with TXU electric provider for over 14 years.
    This month I was sent a letter to sign up for my new rate package before the rates went up and lock in the current rates.
    Holey Moley, my plan does not exist in today's world.
    The new rates were 34.27% higher than I was paying.
    I talked to them on the phone and they had several other plans to choose from. I did all the math on my spreadsheet and the best one was 27.2% higher.

    I went on the web to see what else I could find ( Texas is a state that has many companies to choose from ). I used texaselectricrates.com. Very nice site. The rates per kwh reflect the delivery charges also which a lot of places do not. Here for me it is $8.95 plus $0.0328 per kwh.

    I did the math on several companies and plans they had and chose one called Pennywise. It is a 14 month plan that is only 7% higher than I paid last year.
     
  2. Jun 7, 2018 #2 of 16
    inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    And that’s still so much much much cheaper than here in California!
     
  3. Jun 7, 2018 #3 of 16
    jimmie57

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    That rate you see is just for the delivery. They charge you to be a customer, then a rate for the electricity and then the delivery rate to round it out. The price is $0.092 per kwh for 2000 kwh per month and $0.129 for 500kwh.

    I could not make it in California. I remember when I joined the Navy Reserves I had to go to a class in San Diego. The hamburgers were $2.49 each and here in Texas they were $0.59 for a Big Boy.
     
  4. Jun 8, 2018 #4 of 16
    dmspen

    dmspen Hall Of Fame

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    Last year my CA gas & electric company was forced to offer buying electricity through a renewable resource company. In fact, unless you said NO, the transition was automatic. The new company said electricity rates would be at least 1% lower. What they neglected to point out was the delivery charge the original company had increased by way more than 1% to cover the outside electricity delivery cost. My bill averaged out about 15% higher. Of course to move back to the original company requires a hefty transition fee. Arg.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2018 #5 of 16
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    It does not cost to change companies here unless you change before your contract is up ( they do allow you to change 14 days ahead to avoid a loss of service and a partial bill from the existing company ).
    I hate it when they hide the little details that change the whole picture.
     
  6. Jun 8, 2018 #6 of 16
    phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    In our case we are billed by PG&E the same rates as everyone else. They then deduct a "generation credit" for using the renewable resource alternative. They then add back a "power charge indifference adjustment" which was a system approved by the California Public Utilities Commission to help PG&E recover their investment in generation facilities such as that natural gas/oil power plant you may have seen down by Monterey.

    Last month the net of the generation credit less the indifference adjustment was -$105.35 while the charge from Sonoma Clean Power was $94.61.

    So within this strange and wonderful system we saved $10.74 last month by using the renewable resource alternative. But we didn't choose to not opt out of this because of money. We chose to do it to for the environment.
     
  7. Jun 8, 2018 #7 of 16
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    My bill for last month was $131.00 and the projected bill for this month is $190. Jack those up by the new rate of a 32% increase and you get an ouch.
     
  8. Jun 8, 2018 #8 of 16
    phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    "Ouch" has been in place in California since I retired in 2001. And at times I feel like my retirement had something to do with it.

    Our average monthly bill for 2017 was $410.09. The average for the period of 2003-2017 is $368.37. In the first four months of this year we've paid $1,073.82 or 49% more for electricity than we would have under the rates that were in effect from 1998 to 2001.

    The problem was by 2002 we were paying that 49% more when the CPI (without shelter costs) had risen 0.6%. So while the rest of the cost-of-living was slowly rising from 2001-2018, essentially electricity made my retirement financial planning look really bad.

    Today, the CPI (without shelter costs) is 37% higher, which allows me to complain less about that 49% than I did in the early 2000's.

    Like every Californian, we were victims of what is known as California electricity crisis. This all had to do with deregulation, criminal behavior by financial speculators, and really dumb decisions by California's Government. The crisis was possible because of partial deregulation legislation instituted in 1996 by the California Legislature (AB 1890) and Governor Pete Wilson and federal deregulation.

    After 2002, a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's investigation and report indicated numerous energy trading companies illegally restricted their supply to the point where the spikes in power usage would cause blackouts. Speculators, led by Enron Corporation, were collectively making large profits while the state teetered on the edge for weeks and finally suffered rolling blackouts on January 17 and 18.

    On January 17, 2001, Governor Gray Davis declared a state of emergency in response to the electricity crisis and stepped in to buy power at highly unfavorable terms on the federally deregulated open market, since the California power companies had no buying power and were technically bankrupt (PG&E actually entered bankruptcy under Chapter 11 on April 6, 2001, a month before my retirement became effective).

    Today this all looks like just a piece of the problematic costs of living in California for the working class. A $400 per month electric bill, a $4,000 a month mortgage, and a 4,000 miles per month commute.
     
  9. Jun 8, 2018 #9 of 16
    jimmie57

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    Holey Moley. You should move to Texas. I definitely would not make it in a place that had bills that high.
    Good luck with the bills not going up at the least and hope for them to go down.
     
  10. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Going solar is the best way around this. Even if you end up using some electricity every year the bill will be so much smaller you still come out way ahead. Our sliding scale skyrockets cost if you use more than the first couple years of electricity. Solar can get you below what you are spending in Texas.

    The great thing is they just passed a law that in a few years all new houses will be required to have solar. About dang time.
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Just in CA, tho, right? For new houses, I mean.

    Rich
     
  12. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Yes. California only.

    I know some states try and discourage solar. Dang electric companies are to monopolistic in these states.
     
    Rich likes this.
  13. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    States are not the issue now with clean or renewable energies.
     
  14. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    I’ve seen lots of articles about different companies in a lot of states trying to stop people from putting up Solar on their homes. They only want to be able to use renewable sources so they can still charge everyone and the states are letting prices happen that enforce that.
     
  15. billsharpe

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    I know electric rates are high in California but our average bill last year was about $120 per month. We use gas heat and have no need for air conditioning for our three-bedroom house. There's also a gas stove, dryer, and water heater.
     
  16. dmspen

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    I got a flyer in the mail last Saturday. This same 'environmentally' friendly service is happening with natural gas! I haven't looked into it but I'm not feeling positive.
     

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