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!#! - Mailbox post rotted out !

Discussion in 'The OT' started by scooper, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. Aug 7, 2012 #1 of 21
    scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    Any suggestions on alternatives ?

    Fortunately, today I caught my contractor rural delivery person and filled out a card for them to hold our mail for now, although that will mean stopping at the post Office daily to get it until...

    Options -

    1 (easiest) - rent a PO Box at either the Post Office or at the local pack'n'Ship

    2. Goto Lowes Depot and get a post setup of some kind, and spend a good part of Saturday getting it put in.
    There are , of course , multiple materials that could be used...
     
  2. Aug 7, 2012 #2 of 21
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I don't see what the debate is? Either you rent a PO Box and travel to get your mail or you go to Lowes and get another post.
     
  3. Aug 7, 2012 #3 of 21
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Nice thing with post office boxes, at least here, you can set it up so that they'll email you if mail comes in that day. They'll even take UPS and FedEx packages and keep them for you to pick up (though USPS limits apply, must be 70 pounds or under Etc).
     
  4. Aug 7, 2012 #4 of 21
    fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Is the mailbox is front of your home/property or in a area with multiple mailboxes?

    if you have a community mailbox area, call your local post office and ask them about installing a cluster box. I did this several years back when I lived in California and the only thing we (the homeowners) had to do was get everyone to agree & sign a petition, appoint someone to act as delegate, pour the concrete foundation (our expense) and set the bolts which the USPS provided. After about a week, the USPS will install the boxes and give the keys to the delegate who is responsible for passing them out.
     
  5. Aug 7, 2012 #5 of 21
    Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Just another home repair and not worth the consternation.

    Go to Lowe's. Buy a 6' long 4x4 made from treated lumber. I bet you can buy one just like that. I could at my local hardware superstore, Menards. Dig a hole about 30" deep and put the post in the ground. Attach a wood plate to the top of it into which you can screw on your mailbox. Make the wood plate out of hardwood, not plywood or particle board, because most mailboxes screw into their mounting base from the sides.

    Make sure you follow the USPS rules for how high and how far back from the road your mailbox needs to be. The box needs to be 41" to 45" off the ground, with its front 6" to 8" back from the curb. I had to put a new post under mine last year because it was too low.

    USPS Mailbox Regulations
     
  6. Aug 7, 2012 #6 of 21
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    I've seen just a steel post pounded into the ground, with the box attached to the side. Has to follow guides that Mr. Spock posted.
     
  7. Aug 7, 2012 #7 of 21
    SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    A treated 6 x 6 will last longer. Be tougher for someone to knock over too. Heavier though to handle. LOTS heavier.

    That said, unless you get a lot of mail every day, there is something to be said for PO Boxes if your PO is close enough to be convenient. Keep in mind that some merchants won't accept PO boxes for shipment addresses despite the fact that UPS/FedEx will ship to them. Some POs will let you use their street address and the PO Box number as an apartment number if you ask them nicely. Other POs can be real dinks about it.
     
  8. Aug 7, 2012 #8 of 21
    Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    The post office's recommendation that a post be no bigger than a 4x4 is a good one, at least up here where it gets cold. An errant snowplow can take out a mailbox in one swipe. I'd rather have my box clipped off clean that try to take on a snowplow. I could see that blade pivoting on too sturdy a post and trashing my retaining wall, too.

    I came home one winter day to find my box lying on top of the snow bank by the side of the road. I screwed it back together with long wood screws but that only held for a while. Eventually I had to give up and have the post office hold my mail daily until spring and I could put a new post in the ground.
     
  9. Aug 7, 2012 #9 of 21
    dpeters11

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    Here it's not about them being nice about it, there was an official form I filled out. The post office must be set up for enhanced PO box services though.

    http://faq.usps.com/eCustomer/iq/us...12]&varset(source)=sourceType:embedded#street
     
  10. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    One of my neighbors in rural Wisconsin where I grew up had two mailboxes clipped by plows in a month. He went out and rented a power post hole digger (or ice auger, cant remember) and made a 4 foot hole in the ground, stuck a schedule 40 satellite dish pole about 4" in diameter in the hole, cemented it in, and filled the pole with cement as well.

    As you predicted, the plow hit the pole, and the whole truck swung around and ended up plowing his driveway and front yard :) Needless to say, the mailbox remained mostly intact, and the plow gave his house a wide birth from then on.
     
  11. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    We have some concrete and brick mailboxes near where I live that probably would win against anything less than a plow. They are death traps for anyone who drifts into them.

    Having your mailbox knocked over is annoying, but not worth building something that could kill. There is a balance between what is needed to meet the requirements of rural mail delivery and not creating liability.
     
  12. lugnutathome

    lugnutathome Hall Of Fame

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    My nearest neighbor owns a truck maintenance shop. His post is a crankshaft from a big diesel engine. Heavy!

    Don "not one to hit with a bat at night" Bolton
     
  13. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    I've seen railroad rails, truck chassis springs, reinforced concrete blocks and just about everything else.
     
  14. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    When I said rural delivery - I meant it - the mail delivery for my post office is contracted carriers with their own vehicles. Also - my driveway is 120+ feet long - delivery HAS to be out at the cul-de-sac.

    Having said that - I'll probably do either the treated 4x4 or treated 6x6, or maybe one of those plastic all-in-ones - it really depends on what it looks like when I go shopping Saturday.

    If it didn't involve so many address change notifications - I'd think pretty hard about the PO box - we just don't get that much snail mail anymore - every 2-3 days (sometimes once a week) should be plenty. The post Office is about 2-2.25 miles from our house.

    Thanks for the ideas.
     
  15. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    You can also buy a pre-fab plastic plate (specifically designed for mailboxes) which works great as well. I like wood plates but water always seems to find a way in there and you are having to replace it a few years down the road.

    It also never hurts to stop your mail carrier and take a measurement. The 41 to 45 is a great guideline for a standard mail truck but some rural carriers use vehicles which sit higher or lower then the standard and appreciate the fact you take them into consideration.
     
  16. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    than
     
  17. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Thank you professor :bonk1:
     
  18. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    OUCH! OUCH! OUCH! :stickman:
     
  19. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    actually, shouldn't I be the one doing that? I was thinking of it as you were being like one of those catholic nuns who broke yard sticks over kids hands for screwing up ;) :lol:
     
  20. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

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    We're pretty much all brick here in Texas.
     

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