Mirroring to second tv after upgrade to HR54-200

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by cub411, Sep 10, 2019.

Tags:
  1. cub411

    cub411 New Member

    5
    0
    Sep 10, 2019
    My Mom recently was upgraded to HR54-200 as an MPEG swap. The receiver box and main TV are located in the living room. In years past, my brother had run a coax through the wall to a TV in the bedroom and she could mirror the signal to that TV. After the technician left, we found the coax cables laying loose and no signal on the TV in the bedroom.
    My question is how can I reconnect these so that we can mirror that signal? (It doesn't matter if the TV in the living has to stay turned on or not)
    So far I've tried, HDMI cable from box to HDMI splitter with one HDMI to LR TV and the other to HDMI to video adapter. Then AV cables from video adapter to GE Pro RF Modulator with S-Video with the channel switch set to 3 (like the old TV) and then the out coax to the wall coax. (There are 3 coaxes in the wall...one I think to the old antenna that isn't there anymore). That modulator had a built-in coax on one side for in. I tried every combination of coax to wall but all were no signal on the bedroom TV.
    There is something on the back of the HR54 that says coax but looks more like av (it's colored red and I'm wondering if this could be a digital coax that I could use and maybe hook up a digital coax to regular coax cable and attach it to the coax in the wall?)
    Is there any way for me to fix this for my Mom? I'm not very knowledgeable but I can read and follow instructions and would do anything to get this convenience back for my Mom.
     
  2. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,752
    1,059
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    cub411 likes this.
  3. cub411

    cub411 New Member

    5
    0
    Sep 10, 2019
    Thank you for answering. Please bear with me while I try to understand. The component cables I used were ones Directv had given me years ago. They are red white and yellow and I plugged them into red, white and yellow correspondingly on the adapter and modulator.
    so if I'm reading you correctly, I should still use the HDMI splitter to the HDMI to RCA Converter Adapter to the cables that are red, white and yellow to the RF modulator and then connect a coax to the the out coax of the modulator. Other coax for antenna on the modulator will be hanging loose. Then it's just trial and error to find out which coax in the wall to attach it to. Did I understand correctly? Thanks again for the help.
     
  4. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,752
    1,059
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    Doesn't matter what color the connectors are on the cable. What does matter is what color they are labelled on equipment. If you have red-white-yellow on both pieces of equipment, then make sure that they are connected correspondingly. Red to red, white to white, yellow to yellow. Of course, using a cable with corresponding connector colors makes that task easy. Semantics and technical correction: yellow is composite video (not component video, which is red-blue-green).

    So yes, hdmi from HR54 to splitter. Hdmi from splitter to TV, and from splitter to your RCA converter adapter. Then yellow (for video) and red-white (for audio) to the RF modulator. Coax from modulator output to the remote TV. Make sure both the modulator and TV are set to the same channel (2 or 3). You might have to leave the primary TV on to get the remote TV to work (depending on type of splitter you use). So leave it on while testing. Once both TVs work, then try turning the primary TV off and see if the remote still works.

    Do you have a continuity tester (a multimeter)? If so, I can explain how you can test the coax cables to help identify which one goes to the other TV.
     
  5. cub411

    cub411 New Member

    5
    0
    Sep 10, 2019
    No multimeter. I'll use trial and error. There are only 3 possibilities and the other TV was working the night before the technician came so the coax should still be good.

    Yes, we attached all the cables to the appropriate colors (red, yellow, white). I really want to understand why the HDMI to video adapter didn't work while the HDMI to converter adapter will. I'm reading something that says that some just connect the signal physically while others convert the type of signal from one format to another. Is that why?

    And just to make sure, it doesn't matter if the RF modulator has that S-video in the name, right?

    Thanks for helping me. I need to re-buy all the stuff and order in the converter adapter and then get to my Mom's to set it up. I'll let you know how it goes hopefully with cheers of victory!
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
  6. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,752
    1,059
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    I need to go back and check your links again and re-evaluate your equipment. I'm not able to do that this evening, perhaps tomorrow night.
    There are multiple possibilities, and without double checking all the information I don't want to mis-speak.
    If the remote television isn't too large or heavy, perhaps the easiest way to troubleshoot would be to move it into the same room as the other equipment and connect directly (via coax) so you are not guessing at what coax is which.
     
  7. Mauiguy

    Mauiguy Cool Member

    90
    16
    Jul 13, 2007

    It appears to me that you have done the following:

    1. Taken the HDMI cable and split it into two separate HDMI cables. One to the TV nearest the receiver,and one designated to go to the remote TV.

    2. You then further split the remote HDMI cable to the old Red White and Yellow RCA type connectors.

    3. Then you took the Three RCA cables and connected them to: GE Pro RF Modulator with S-Video. I think that this is where the mistake was made.

    If i read things correctly the GE modulator you have is designed to take the game output from the old video games and convert them from Coax to RCA connectors and S-Video, but does NOT do so in reverse. It looks to me like you are trying to convert the three cables back to COAX and I do not believe that the Modulator you have linked to does that for you.

    To clarify i see that GE modulator capable converting a coaxial cable to composite and s video, but not converting the composite or s video back to coaxial cable.
     
  8. Bill Broderick

    Bill Broderick Icon

    2,673
    254
    Aug 25, 2006
    Long Island
    I don't think that's correct (if the product description for the modulator is correct). According to the product page linked to in the first post: "This GE Pro RF Modulator connects composite enabled audio/video devices to an older TV with only an "F" type (coax) input. Today's AV components are not equipped with coaxial outputs. Some older TVs are equipped with only a single coaxial input. Use this RF modulator to connect DVD players, DVRs, camcorders, video game consoles, etc. equipped with composite enabled audio/video outputs to televisions equipped with only a single "F" type (coax) input."

    This product is intended to convert the composite signal back to Coax.
     
  9. Bill Broderick

    Bill Broderick Icon

    2,673
    254
    Aug 25, 2006
    Long Island
    Don't worry about the S-video. That is just allowing the option of using an S-Video or composite video (yellow plug) for the video input. From what I see, the three "gadgets" that you have should work as you intend them to. If it were me, I'd start by testing each item, one at a time, to determine where the failure is. I'm going to assume that the TV in the living room is more modern and has HDMI, composite and Coax inputs. Since you are confident that the coax to the bedroom is OK, I'd test with the Living room TV. First run the HDMi signal into the splitter and from the splitter to the TV. If that works, then the splitter is probably OK. Then disconnect the HDMI from the TV and connect it to the video adapter and connect the Red, yellow & white cables to the TV. If that works, then the video adapter is OK. It's possible that you get an on screen HDMI warning message. That would go back to Carl's comment that the living room TV will need to be on in order to watch in the bedroom. But, for this test, that's OK. Even if you're getting that message, then the video adapter works. Lastly, I'd disconnect the composite cables from the TV, plug them into the RF modulator and connect a short coax to the living room TV. If that works, then there is some type of cabling issue between the living room and bedroom (the wrong cable was connected?).
     
  10. Brad_73

    Brad_73 New Member

    4
    0
    Jul 16, 2019
    Southeast, GA
    The HR-54 has a legacy A/V output on it, in the form of a 10pin connector. All you need is the 10 pin adapter for $5
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Computer...C41-C41W-CLIENT-RCA-A-V-10PINCOMPOS/191622489
    Then that goes into your GE modulator to send coax to the other room.
    Cheaper, less clutter and points of failure, and efficient.

    The only problem might be using that output at the same time as the HDMI output on the HR-54. It has been a long time since I did a setup like this but I remember something about warning messages when trying to do 1080i on component video like this. Not sure if it affects composite video.
     
  11. cub411

    cub411 New Member

    5
    0
    Sep 10, 2019
    I would love to try this since as you said, less wires, etc. Will need to order the part since none of our local Walmarts stock it.
     
  12. cub411

    cub411 New Member

    5
    0
    Sep 10, 2019
    That is a great idea about moving the old TV into the living room while I work this out. It's not super heavy but it's not light like a flat screen.
     

Share This Page

spam firewall