NAB Chief Gordon Smith Chides AT&T And Dish Network For Broadcast Blackouts

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by dennispap, Jul 23, 2019.

  1. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    Tribune has been suggested as where the ReCast gets theirs, but I have no idea.
    I have looked at ATSC outboard tuners for the computer. I presume that is what you mean?
     
  2. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    Exactly.
     
  3. grover517

    grover517 AllStar

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    I heard the guide data for the Recast comes from Gracenote.
     
  4. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    I have never heard of Gracenote. Are they new?
     
  5. Mark Holtz

    Mark Holtz Day Sleeper

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    Richardson,...
    Gracenote - Wikipedia
     
  6. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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  7. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Tribune is Gracenote. DISH used their service in the past but now uses a different service. But the issue is NOT the source of the data, it is matching the correct data to the correct channel. The Recast could be using zip codes to narrow down the possible matches or other schemes. DISH uses the TSID. If the station is not broadcasting the correct TSID you'll get the wrong EPG (matching channels in other areas) or no EPG for that channel at all.
     
  8. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. There are several I do not get guides for, but Dish may not offer them either.
    I did not know about the Gracenote being Tribune. By the way, is there anything I can do on my end to get this issue solved?
     
  9. WebTraveler

    WebTraveler Icon

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    BS, Smith and his cronies are the cause of this....pure greed. Broadcasters survived for decades on free over the air TV, now they want commercials and subscriber fees. They don't get it both ways.

     
  10. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    The problem I read about on another source that broadcasters cannot make it any longer on ads. The top of the line TV shows are expensive to produce. Some at $1 million an episode. Years ago, TV did not have to put out so much money and there was a lot less competition for years we only had the 3 main nets (before Fox) and a handful of cable channels that mostly ran old re-runs. Even Sports was a lot less expensive. It is a different World today. But I think with the cost going up up up, people are getting tired of paying $$$ just to get TV. I never thought years ago that TV would cost $50 a month, let alone $100 or more. It is more expensive as some utility bills. There has to be a breaking point somewhere.
    Rumor has it, unless Dish can get a decent fair deal with the RSN's, they will not be back. The same way HBO/Cinemax went. In both cases the companies want money to cover all Dish subs, even the ones that do not sub to the channels. Sure, Dish will lose subs, but the cost of keeping high priced channels, it is better to eat the loss.
    On another note, Dish has been adding channels like Diginets that are inexpensive to have and yet offers entertainment. They may no be as popular, but it sure keeps the cost down. I used to get upset when there was a blackout. Now I don't really care. Sure some channels I miss, but if they are all that important there are streaming options.
     
  11. Mark Holtz

    Mark Holtz Day Sleeper

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    It used to be that the networks paid the local stations to carry the network programming. Now, the local stations even have to pay the networks to carry the network programming.

    What shook things up was when Fox snagged the rights to NFL football from CBS in 1993. CBS, at the time, carries the NFC teams which were preferred at the time over the AFC teams. CBS wanted to reduce paying for the NFL rights from $265 million to $250 million, while Rupert Murdoch was willing to pay $400 million per year for four years as part of the cost to have Fox be taken seriously. After that deal, stations were willing to switch affiliations to keep the NFL. A few years later, because some of the costs were paid by the stations, the Fox Kids programming was cancelled and the time returned to the local stations. Another thing which increased costs for the station is the transition to digital and HDTV, which increased both equipment and operating costs.

    The television stations would love nothing better than to go back to the good old days where each household had only one television, there were only three major networks and possibly one-two independent stations, and VCRs, DVDs, BluRays, and the Internet didn't exist. Television by appointment, and if you missed your appointment, you just have to wait several months to get the rerun. Watch television on your phone? Pure science fantasy.

    Not anymore. The only television rights worth having is the sports rights, as that is event television, and because it's live, the commercials are unskippable. Even that is fractured as the only sport whose regular season is on broadcast television is the NFL. Even the playoff rounds is on cable, with only the final round on broadcast television. Everything else is on Regional $ports Networks. But, the stadiums and arenas are no longer sold out on a regular basis.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2019

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