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Natural gas risks

Discussion in 'The OT' started by AntAltMike, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. matt

    matt New Member

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    Jan 11, 2010
    Depends on the shape of the system, IMO. If there is nothing unsafe about you system and you call the gas company because your stove leaked a little bit from the pilot orifice, and the yard has to be dug up and sheetrock repaired, or in the case of my house, because you cant fit in the crawlspace, the floor cut out in several spots, don't you think that is a little excessive? It would have been a simple fix to pop in a new stove, as opposed to a large plumbing bill because some city inspector thinks the main line running through the house is a 1/4" too small to service the kitchen?

    You think you won't see that bill tucked in there when your lease renews? What would have been a $300 stove that was replaced and forgotten about as normal wear and tear on an old stove is now a "needless" expense and a $50 or more increase in your rent, costing you at least double that. Things like that also factored in when 3 or 4 air conditioners go out, you get pushed to the end of the list, instead of the top.

    Sounds good for the tenant to me to let the landlord fix problems with his house instead of going over his head, but that just could be me.

    Now if there is something obviously wrong, gas is bubbling up through your yard, and the landlord won't deal with it, sure, call the gas co.
     
  2. matt

    matt New Member

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    Jan 11, 2010
    Same with the electric service. "Force" your landlord to rewire the entire house to current code that has a zinsco breaker panel or has aluminum wiring when the light switch alone could have been repaired by an electrician and see how much your rent goes up when it is time to renew.
     
  3. navy8ball

    navy8ball Legend/Supporter

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    Mar 23, 2002
    I agree with the majority of all that was said here. one thing you must do is to get some co2/smoke alarm detectors.they are around $20 and can save your life.
     
  4. jerry downing

    jerry downing Godfather

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    Mar 7, 2004
    Illinois
    The house that I'm living in now was rebuilt after a former owner decided to save money by installing a water heater himself. After he he finished, he congratulated himself and used the money to take his wife out to dinner. When he returned, most of the house was on fire.
     
  5. Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Jan 24, 2007
    I've had gas heat/hot water/stove for 20+ years.

    Everything I have now is electronic ignition so I don't have any pilot lights but when we did, we've never had a problem.

    Mike
     
  6. matt

    matt New Member

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    Jan 11, 2010
    µß, they make electric ignition hot water tanks? I got a fancy one a year ago and it still had a standing pilot.
     
  7. dsw2112

    dsw2112 Always Searching

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    Jun 12, 2009
    I've worn several hats in my life (one being an electrician) and I've found time and again that many folks that think they're "handy" are far from it... I guess it's just like anything, it pays to know what you're talking about. I wonder what his insurance company had to say about that one...
     
  8. matt

    matt New Member

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    Jan 11, 2010
    Installation is not for everyone, I will agree to that. :lol:
     
  9. dsw2112

    dsw2112 Always Searching

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    Jun 12, 2009
    You can get them either way; the electric are supposedly "slightly" more efficient without the standing pilot but it's negligable... Most people like the convenience of electric ignite until the electronics fail :lol:
     
  10. matt

    matt New Member

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    Jan 11, 2010
    Yeah, and the rest of us love when whirlpool makes bad thermocouple with opposite thread direction than everyone else, and the whole burner has to be replaced, which gets shipped to you loose in a box and damaged on the way to you.

    Whirlpool hot water tanks are junk. I know I am getting off topic, but along with the burner issue :nono2:, I got one in the discount isle at Lowe's that ended up having leaks around the water inlet. I noticed it after I dragged it up the steps and pressurised it, so drain it and drag it back to the store. Grab another that was new in box this time, lug it up the steps, pressurize it, and get it heating. Everything's great, then I am in the other room and hear water. The darn thing has water that is barely warm to the touch and the pressure relief valve is spewing. Drag it out again, and finally got one that has been fine for a year.

    I hope you got a bradford white.
     

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