NBC Decides That They Need To Stop Canceling Shows In Order To 'Restore' Their Brand

Discussion in 'TV Show Talk' started by dennispap, Jun 26, 2016.

  1. dennispap

    dennispap Icon

    827
    26
    Feb 1, 2007
    “The comedy brand got a little murky for us,” she said. Now, she noted, NBC’s comedy brand is intended to be “smart, specific, a little sophisticated and not too sweet.” (By way of negative example, Salke noted the “saccharine” quality of Growing Up Fisher, the failed 2014 blind-dad sitcom.)

    As part of the hoped-for comedy turnaround, Salke pledged, “we won’t cancel shows quickly.”


    https://www.yahoo.com/news/nbc-decides-stop-canceling-shows-194412274.html
     
  2. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    15,373
    411
    Jan 18, 2007
    Northern...
    Yeah, I read that. Of course I liked "Growing Up Fisher" so she alienated me.

    Ideas like "The censors have backed off, partly in response to changes driven by cable" and "smart, sophisticated but not alienating” are ok, I guess, but the words "funny" or "fun" are not in the original Hollywood Reporter article about a comedy comeback.

    I don't understand people who think it will make things funnier because the censors have backed off from those rigid nunnery-like rules of four years ago. Nor do I understand who decides what's "not alienating." The network bosses that had "Friends" and "Seinfeld" years ago didn't seem to struggle.

    I'm sure buried in their new comedy list will be one we like because we get a chuckle or two or even a laugh? [​IMG]

    But if they are going for the HBO/Showtime comedy audiences, they're still in some that Manhattan bubble that can't see where the broadcast TV audience lives.
     
  3. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

    49,816
    1,897
    Apr 17, 2003
    Michiana
    The comedy doesn't need to be raunchy to get a laugh. What is needed is programmers who are not afraid to tell a funny story that isn't every line is a laugh. Jokes that may go over the head of the raunchy punchline audience.
     
  4. toricred

    toricred New Member

    90
    1
    Feb 12, 2004
    Northern...
    And stop putting a gay character in every show. We get it, but not every show needs a gay character.
     
  5. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,626
    392
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    Every show doesn't need a minority or a woman either... We "get it" right? Just white males on TV, and it would be better? Not sure what you're implying there toricred.

    If it's an anti-gay agenda, let's not go there...

    BUT if it is a sincere "don't stick a character in just to check off a box" then I can roll with that. I like well-rounded, developed characters. I don't care if they are gay or straight if they are well-written and well-performed.
     
    2 people like this.
  6. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

    4,153
    101
    Aug 31, 2002
    I can't wait to see how long that lasts. Network heads should be smart enough not to paint themselves into corners.
     
  7. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

    4,153
    101
    Aug 31, 2002
    No, I think what is needed is talent. And an open mind. Shows that use biting humor and sarcasm, that make a comedic point without put-down lines or one-liners, struggle. Some of the best comedy out there, such as Parks and Recreation, Community, Arrested Development, and this year, The Grinder, used a meta approach that went over the heads of a lot of people. Whether those folks liked raunch (which this wasn't) or not is likely not a factor in how well they could get a joke. As a matter of fact, if your mind is closed to raunch, it is likely closed to lots of things. All those shows struggled. All were gone too soon.

    What is the most successful comedy? The Big Bang Theory. That, and Two and a Half Men (which might be on the air still if its star had not torpedoed it) Use one-liners, put-downs, and laugh tracks indicating where we should laugh, because they know what is funny and what is not funny (or so they think).

    Lenny Bruce did not get arrested because he was obscene. That was the premise, but Lenny Bruce scared people and made them think. All good humor does that, to a degree.
     
  8. mrknowitall526

    mrknowitall526 Active Member

    444
    47
    Nov 18, 2014
    Lehigh...
    This reminds me of The Middle on ABC. Never raunchy, no laugh track, yet I laugh hysterically during most episodes. It's good, clever writing about relatable topics. That's what makes it funny.

    Sent from my 2PS64 using Tapatalk
     
  9. dennispap

    dennispap Icon

    827
    26
    Feb 1, 2007
    Agreed about the Middle, also Modern Family and The Goldbergs.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

    4,153
    101
    Aug 31, 2002
    I'm not really with you on the other three, but Modern Family might be the best-crafted comedy ever. Even if the flamboyance is stereotypical and off-putting to some.

    I tip my hat. But yes, that is a back-handed compliment. As much as I like it, for some reason I still have 43 unseen eps on my DVR. I think the problem is that it's too frantic. It ups my anxiety level to see such anxious driven people acting like this. There are no dynamics here. They turn the volume up to 11 and it stays there for 30 minutes. Every. Single. Episode.

    And that's the best sitcom. Really. Hugely successful; won the Emmy at least four times in a row.

    And that underlines a huge problem with one-size-fits-all network television, and even movies, which is that there is such pressure to get our attention, and then hold it by creating a false level of drama or comedy or enthusiasm, that it all becomes a blur after a while. MF hits you over the head with line after line until you want to just go walk the dog.

    It's a combination of network pressure to feed the beast and insecurity that their writing could be compelling without resorting to such pedestrian antics. But since they have determined that the average person touches their phone over 2600 times a day. A DAY! I'm not kidding, I guess it isn't all that surprising. The great unwashed (I am part of it) really isn't looking for much beyond what MF is giving them.

    I wish TV could be just two fascinating people sitting and having a conversation, no car chases, no terrorist attacks, no zombies, and especially no GOT period-piece emoting. But then, My Dinner With Andre will probably never get 12 eps green-lighted, will it?
     

Share This Page

spam firewall