Net Neutrality ...

Discussion in 'Legislative and Regulatory Issues' started by SayWhat?, Nov 20, 2010.

  1. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Are we still using that Internet or has private companies built their own internet similar to the one the government created?

    It seems to me that a tracert to pretty much anywhere I go doesn't use the same Internet that existed when I got my first domain (1995). Nowadays the connections are private backbone to private backbone with the government nets only popping up when visiting government and some educational sites.
     
  2. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    I don't disagree. Much like the railroads in the west in the 19th Century, or the spreading of the power grid during the early 20th Century, where in both cases the Government facilitated the effort every step of the way, the Internet is a privately owned public utility system.

    The tension is between the private owners and the "public" nature of the utility. The government has to maintain the balance.
     
  3. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    I'm guessing the some here on this thread work for ISPs that will be affected by the rules and are desperately engaging in propaganda to skew public opinion in their favor and against fairness to the consumer.
     
  4. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Doesn't it all come down to whom do we trust to protect
    net neutrality, the ISPs (Comcast, AT&T, etc.) or the FCC?

    Here are our choices:

    1. [ ] ISPs
    2. [ ] FCC
    3. [x] None of the above


    What's that??? 'None of the above' isn't a choice?

    My bad. :(
     
  5. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Actually, I'm not sure the FCC has the authority to do it either. So if you put it ISPs, Congress, or None of the above, the latter is really the only option.
     
  6. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    I've learned form many years of personal experience NOT to trust AT&T. Never had to deal with Comcast that I know of.


    I cant' think of a single reason why it shouldn't be under the FCC. It's certainly a communications method. And it uses telephone, television (cable) and or radio/wireless/cellular services for access, all of which are already under FCC control.
     
  7. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    Sure it has [heavy sarcasm]. That is why the US ranks #15 when it comes to speed and costs. See Gizmodo link in post #11 of this thread. Japan averages speeds of 12 times faster than the US for 1/12th the price. Yep, we're doing just great.

    I don't want the FCC to regulate the internet other than to ensure that we are allowed to surf/download without being blocked by the ISP. Some ISPs that are also content providers (e.g. COMCAST), have already shown that in their model of 'our' internet, they will block/throttle access to their competition.
     
  8. kenglish

    kenglish Icon

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    The FCC doesn't have to "ask" Congress' permission for anything...
    Congress actually runs the FCC.
    The FCC is a special type of entity that is under no other department or branch of government, except Congress itself. It does only THEIR bidding.
     
  9. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    So if the commissioners wanted to do something that was against what Congress wanted ... they would 'ask'.

    The FCC has a lot of leeway with making their own decisions. As long as they are not going against Congress they make their own rules.
     
  10. kenglish

    kenglish Icon

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    Congress gives the FCC their orders, and the FCC is expected to make the rules that will carry them out. If the FCC goes too far, Congress can rein them in and make them change the rules.
    But, Congress is the only body that can do so, since the FCC is not under any department (like Justice, Commerce, etc). Every other agency has a department or branch of government between them and the Congress/Administration.
     
  11. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The FCC does more than just copy the rules that Congress wrote. :rolleyes:
     
  12. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    A number of independent agencies exist.

    In terms of domestic policy, probably the most important today is the Federal Reserve System which has the responsibility to conduct the nation's monetary policy, supervise and regulate banking institutions, maintain the stability of the financial system and provide financial services to depository institutions, the U.S. government, and foreign official institutions.

    The first was the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) was a regulatory body in the United States created by the Interstate Commerce Act of 1887, which was signed into law by President Grover Cleveland. (The agency was abolished in 1995.) The ICC's original purpose was to regulate railroads (and later trucking) to ensure fair rates, to eliminate rate discrimination, and to regulate other aspects of common carriers.

    Wikipedia lists about 30 examples under an article entitled Independent agencies of the United States government.

    An example that many of us remember was when in 1971 Congress eliminated the Cabinet position of Postmaster General and created the United States Postal Service, defined by statute as an "independent establishment" of the federal government.
     
  13. Shades228

    Shades228 DaBears

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    The FCC can reclassify ISP's and then they fall into the FCC domain for regulation on internet. They are attempting to not use that legal loop hole. They have the authority to do so under those laws. That's all the Appeals court validated was that if the FCC doesn't change the clasification they don't have that authority.

    If people hate carriage disputes now wait until there are such things with ISP's. The only difference is in most areas you're limited on choices to maybe 2-3 options. Yes there are some areas where you have 5+(you don't need to tell us) those are the exception to the rule.

    I'm not a fan of regulations because if written poorly or done incorrectly they have the potential for the same backlash. Companies are going to find ways to make as much money as possible. That's their goal and we award them for it. However I am in favor of something that clearly and unerringly states that companies in charge of distribution of bandwidth may not impede speed, or delivery of any legal content. If the need for clasification needs to be made then it needs to be written so that new clasifications cannot be created by adding a "feature" to it.

    I cannot see in any way how this can impede a companies ability to design new content and compete. I can see how it can impede a companies ability to start new fee systems like we have currently for TV. Imagine having to pay more for unhindered access to Disney's websites. The possibilities are endless on how pay for content/bandwidtch could change the internet in a negative way. It isn't much of a stretch to say that the current pay for TV model could be the next internet usage model.
     
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  14. FTA Michael

    FTA Michael Hall Of Fame

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    In a way, we're already there. I'd love to have access to streaming video on ESPN3 (formerly ESPN360.com), but it's completely unavailable to me because of my ISP.

    If I had chosen Comcast to provide my internet access, ESPN3 would be free to me. Since I use Qwest instead, ESPN3 is unavailable at any price.

    I don't know that I'd be willing to spend more than a dollar or two for ESPN3, but it irks me that it has to be either in the "basic tier" of internet service (so every ISP user pays for it) or not available.
     
  15. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    From FCC to try again on net neutrality we learn:

     
  16. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    I've also seen mention that Verizon may be doing the opposite - throttling speeds to NF.


    And so it begins.
     
  17. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/02/verizon-seeks-payment-for-carrying-netflix-traffic-wsj-reports/
     
  18. jsk

    jsk Icon

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    If I pay for Internet service, I should be able to go to any website that I please. What if Comcast/Vivendi/Universal/NBC/(soon to be)Time Warner Cable take it to the next level and decided to block websites for unfriendly political candidates, their competitors, or ideas that they don't like? These companies are getting too powerful in deciding what they will allow you to see.

    I was a little irritated that when I was in Target one time, whenever I went to some of their competitors' websites, it redirected me to the Target website. Even though their WiFi is "free," (which I am really paying for when I buy something) they shouldn't be deciding which websites I visit. It looks like they have stopped doing this, but it shows that companies will do things like this.
     
  19. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    From The Hollywood Reporter:

    If I were starting a new thread, I would entitle it "End to Net Neutrality Coming". It's unclear what this will actually mean in the year 2020 other than paying higher fees to streaming services like Netflix and Amazon. I'm sure it won't slow down access to my personal web site. :sure:
     
  20. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    I agree ... it's the beginning of the end of net neutrality. When
    Comcast squeezed Netflix' nuts we all felt a sharp twinge of pain.
    Too big to fail has turned into 'too big to lose'. Thanks, FCC and
    DOJ and a bought and paid for Congress.

    For consumers, it's all downhill from here. Say goodnight, Gracie.
     

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