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New customer install question

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by rhider, Dec 25, 2011.

  1. rhider

    rhider New Member

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    Dec 25, 2011
    I just signed up for DirecTv and have the install scheduled for Monday the 26th. I have a few concerns that were posed by my brother who did cable and dish installs for Time Warner and Dish network.

    I ordered Whole House DRV, Choice Xtra package, with 1 HD DVR, 3 HD Receivers, 2 SD Receviers. My whole house is wired with standard RJ59 (i beleive) for the digital cable i have had for years.

    Bro told me to get the full range of channels they would need to rewire my whole house!! AND that is not included in the "standard install" but could end up costing HUNDREDS of dollars to rewire. He had done installs where he would activate 4 or 5 receivers and leave them stacked in one room for the home owner to run the wires themselves to the parts of the house they want.

    The layout i was hoping for was....
    Basement-HD Box
    1st floor-HD DVR in the living, HD Box in master bedroom
    2nd floor- 2 SD boxes in 2 bedrooms
    2nd floor above garage- HD Box

    The house also has a WiFi network if that helps the matter at all...

    PLEASE tell me i wont have holes in walls or wires dangling everywhere with this "free" install!! I'm hoping they can tap into the "feed" wire I have in the garage and goto the "network room" that feeds the rest of the house.
     
  2. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    It is really hard to say much over the internet.
    "Standard" install would have coax run on the outside [or underneath, or in the attic], where fishing coax through inside walls will cost extra.
    Are you sure you have RG59?
    If its RG6 [quite common for the last 10-15 years] it won't be an issue.
    Maybe you should get "your brother" over to check what you have.
     
  3. trh

    trh This Space for Sale

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    I RG59 on two of my runs (out of 6). No problem. I think I've read here that RG59 will work on everything but where your PI is located -- that run requires RG6. But as VOS said, check to see what you currently have. Good luck tomorrow.
     
  4. rhider

    rhider New Member

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    Dec 25, 2011
    The house was built in 2006. When we got here all the cable ends were cut off in the basement. Forclosure damage ;) Maybe is it RG6. Is the cable core the only way to tell? (steel vs. copper)

    Then I had my brother tone out the cables to the rooms and recrimp all the ends on to my 24 cable outlets. There is one drop from the pole to a three way splitter feeding 3 eight way splitters with 3 amps.

    He told me today that it everything was steel core cable and I would need copper core to replace it for the DirecTv install.

    There is also Cat5 ethernet in every room but i have yet to rewire everything hacked apart in the basement for that.... GRRRRR....

    Could they feed the new line, or lines, from the dish to a "splitter" and connect my existing cables that are already fished throughout the house to the new receivers?
     
  5. Shades228

    Shades228 DaBears

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    You can get steel clad core or solid copper core in RG6. On the cable it should have the rating of the cable on it usually every 3 feet or so. They could possibly run the one line from the dish to your panel and then add the splitter there. As far as using the existing cable that's going to be the tech's call. Technically any non RG6 solid copper core needs to be replaced to match spec. What happens in the field though doesn't always follow the policy. Steel clad core is ok if the runs are short but I'm guessing with the amount of amps and lines run before they probably are not short runs to have 24 lines throughout a house.
     
  6. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    As long as the RG59 are home runs to each location you'll be fine. If they're bridge every which way, then you'll have an issue.
     
  7. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    With one DVR, 3 HD receivers and 2 SD receivers you will have a total of 7 tuners (2 tuners in the DVR, 1 tuner in the receivers). That easily fits in what is supported by an SWiM LNB assembly (which supports 8 tuners).

    The installer should install one coax from the dish to your central distribution location. At that location, if there is AC power available, you will get a power inserter and a splitter. From the outputs of the splitter you will have a single coax to each TV location (re-using what you already have). The installer should not re-use the splitters you currently have, he should provide a new, correct splitter that meets the DIRECTV specifications.

    Unless there is something wrong with the existing coax runs, or they are very long, there should be no problem reusing them even if they are RG59, and regardless of whether they are solid copper or copper clad steel. Probably they are RG59 and copper clad steel. The new coax run from the dish to the power inserter will be RG6 with solid copper center conductor.

    Depending on where your central point is (where all the coax terminate), you may or may not be looking at installation costs. If it is on an outside wall, or easily accessed from above (attic) or below (crawl space or unfinished basement), then the installer will simply run the coax, drill through as needed, and terminate it. It won't be fished inside a wall (for free).
     
  8. rhider

    rhider New Member

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    Dec 25, 2011
    By homerun i am assuming that is an uninterupted, unsplit, or unspliced from central location to receiver. Does a wall plate connection degrade the "homerun" theory?
     
  9. rhider

    rhider New Member

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    Dec 25, 2011

    Carl6, this sounds just like i am expecting!! The central point is just that, dead center of the home in the unfinished basement. Now my only concern is where the dish will be mounted and how to get to the central point. I feel alot better hearing there will be only one drop from the dish, not four. and that the existing cabling can be utilized.
     
  10. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    I'm thinking you're going to regret getting only one DVR. Many times you will find the to need to record more than two shows at a time. Did anyone at DirecTV mention a HMC? That's their new receiver. It has five tuners.
     
  11. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Give your own issue with the HR34, "just getting" another DVR may make better sense.
     
  12. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    From what I'm reading, "if you need a cable changed", it would be for the run from the PI [power inserter] to the dish. Solid copper core should be used for this run, but copper clad [steel] will work fine from the PI, and on all other drops.
     
  13. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    When the installer arrives, walk/talk through the install with him before work starts. Discuss dish location and coax routing. For an unfinished basement, the easiest is to run the coax from the dish down the outside of the house to a point where he will drill through into your basement, then complete the run to your central point. That run should be neat, but it won't necessarily be in a manner that would allow you to finish over it. If that is a concern (being able to finish over it), make sure you discuss the options with the installer.

    As to possible dish locations, go to www.dishpointer.com and explore the possibilities for your home. Keep in mind though, there are factors in addition to line of sight that will influence the installers preferred dish location point.

    Also, make sure you have the specific coax lines you will need for your install clearly marked somehow for when the installer shows up. If you don't know which are which, he can tone them out.

    I would agree with getting a second DVR, so you end up with two DVRs, two HD receivers, and two SD receivers. That totals 8 tuners which still works with the SWM LNB. In fact, I would go with all HD receivers (rather than 2 SD). More up front cost, but you will then be able to do MRV from all tv locations (SD receivers can't do MRV).
     
  14. rhider

    rhider New Member

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    Dec 25, 2011
    "I would agree with getting a second DVR, so you end up with two DVRs, two HD receivers, and two SD receivers. That totals 8 tuners which still works with the SWM LNB. In fact, I would go with all HD receivers (rather than 2 SD). More up front cost, but you will then be able to do MRV from all tv locations (SD receivers can't do MRV)."

    The reason for SD boxes are the tv's are old SD with only coaxial connections.
    What configuration would I went with the HMC receiver? That would put me up to 10 tuners. Different dish, more drops from dish? Sorry for all the newbie questions. I am just nervous about this switch. I have never had anything but cable.


    Thank you all, especially Carl6, for all your input!!
     
  15. longrider

    longrider Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I agree with Carl6 regarding the HD receivers both for futureproofing and the ability to use MRV. Without a composite in on the TV you will need RF modulators but those can be picked up cheap either online or locally. Even Target should have them. You tell the receiver that it is hooked to a 4:3 TV and it will letterbox 16:9 shows for you. Make sure you set the receiver to 480i so that when the new GUI gets to you the graphics will be visible on the composite out.

    If you get the HMC34 you will need a SWM16 switch which means 4 lines from the dish but the rest of your house distribution will still be OK. Seeing you are in Maine I would put the dish on the side of the house so you can reach it with a broom (if line of sight permits) and then the run from the dish to where it goes into the basement would be very short.
     
  16. rhider

    rhider New Member

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    Dec 25, 2011
    Well the install went off without a hitch. Had a GREAT tech that explained things to me and answered all of my questions. The house was already wired with the RG6 cable.
    Dish had to be mounted on the garage roof for line of sight...now snow is my concern.
    Being in Maine does every dusting need to be cleaned out of the dish or just large storms? Any ideas for me to avoid pulling out the 30' ladder and climbing to the roof every storm??
     
  17. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    Dry snow will normally not be a problem. Very wet heavy snow takes very little accumulation to block signal. There are dish heaters you can get to melt snow and ice. Some have suggested super shooters (or equivalent) filled with warm (not hot) water to save climbing the ladder.
     
  18. tomallison24

    tomallison24 AllStar

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    Will installers use 2.5 year old Dish cable to avoid fishing through walls?
     
  19. wallfishman

    wallfishman Icon

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    yes. if its 2.5 years old and solid copper rg6 it will be fine. 2.5 year old cable is brand new in this business
     

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