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New DVRs or is the road map through DTV Now?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by wco81, May 8, 2018.

  1. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    Yes, they'll still be able to get DTV satellite service if they want it, but AT&T will spend less resources marketing satellite TV to those folks and more on marketing OTT TV (AT&T TV and/or DTV Now) to them. Satellite TV isn't going away overnight and I've never said it was. I just believe that AT&T will de-emphasize it. They see the long-terms trends that are happening with that product and know they're not going to change. Rather, they're accepting the trends and choosing to "cannibalize" -- or as they put it, "transition" -- their own user base before some other disruptor (Hulu, Google, Comcast, etc.) does. They're going to work to make the margins as good as they can possibly be on the OTT services (thanks to targeted ads, Turner content ownership, lower customer acquisition and ongoing operation costs) to which they'll aim to shift the satellite subscriber base. But the hay day of traditional pay TV distribution is over, and I think AT&T knows it.

    I expect there will be a similar rental fee per receiver built into the monthly cost of the upcoming "home-centric" OTT service, AT&T TV (or whatever it's ultimately branded).

    As for customer acquisition costs, here's just one comment directly from AT&T that touches on the topic. This is a Q and A from the most recently AT&T quarterly earnings call on 4/25/18:

    Q: Give us a little bit more color on maybe the free cash flow aspects in your Entertainment business as you're switching more to the DIRECTV NOW product. That would be great.

    A: On the free cash flow side, if you will, Frank, I guess I'll say it this way. Moving to the DTV NOW platform or moving to a thin client platform eventually for the home is really going to change the free cash flow aspects because of the upfront of truck roll cost, the upfront, if you will, climb the roof costs, all of that can change as well as some of the things with regard to billing and administrative costs, the fact that it's an automatic bill or it's a credit card bill, all of those things will change.

    But that's one of the attractiveness is about the DTV NOW is the economics about not having that upfront investment. That will turn into savings from an upfront investment from a cash flow perspective. So that's why this thing we strongly believe it will work long term.
     
  2. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Does the person who said that realize that DIRECTV no longer goes on roofs?
     
  3. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    They are allowed on the roofs with proper fall protection as OSHA regs allow. They seem to have overlooked this, much as they ignored the high work rules in the first place.

    Rich
     
  4. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    Where are they sticking the dishes now? Or are the dishes still going on roofs, but the installer is just supposed to keep his feet on the ladder instead of actually walking on the roof?
     
    7thton likes this.
  5. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Totally disagree, I fully expect sat to have everything you can get off streaming and more.

    I also feel that the vast majority of people won’t care one bit about having a hs17 genie...
     
  6. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    It seems to be easier to say "no roofs" than to have proper fall protection (now that they follow the regulations).

    Yep. Work from the ladder. Probably not a bad idea as that means that the dish is more likely to be on the eaves of the roof instead of over livable space (just in case the weatherproofing on the bolts fails).
     
  7. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    So satellite is gonna start carrying all that original content from Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, etc?
     
  8. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    if ATT will decide do that, then yes - plenty of free bandwidth on the sats now
     
  9. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Yes, if they can reach the dish from the ladder they can work on it. To get off the ladder they need fall protection. Speaking of ladders, is D* aware of the ladder regs that say a ladder must be footed or secured at the top of the ladder? Kinda think they ignore that. All the installers I've had were alone.

    Rich
     
  10. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Most of the Optimum trucks I see being driven by installers are equipped with buckets. Such a truck could be utilized by D* installers and the installers could then be secured to the bucket when working on a roof. If a cable company can do this to protect installers why can't D*?

    Rich
     
  11. NashGuy

    NashGuy Active Member

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    I was joking when I asked that question. There's no way that Netflix and other OTT streamers are gonna start distributing their content outside of the internet but instead through waning last-century tech like DBS.

    I assume what inkahauts meant when he posted "I fully expect sat to have everything you can get off streaming and more" is that he expects DTV satellite to have all of the same traditional cable channels (e.g. FX, AMC, ESPN) and sports packages (e.g. NFL Sunday Ticket) that are offered through OTT streaming services (vMVPDs). And given the amount of satellite capacity and number of subscribers that DTV has, I would generally agree. (Although Epix is an exception.)
     
  12. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Bucket trucks are a LOT more expensive. Cable companies need to have them available because they run wires on poles and need to be able to fix them, satellite companies don't.
     
  13. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    If they want to limit their income they are welcome to do so. The "stream only" providers have done OK with their exclusive content. They built their businesses on common content (movies and TV shows aired via traditional sources) and added "exclusive" content to set themselves apart. Some of the exclusives are decent shows - some are not. The better content will end up somewhere else if the content owner can make more money that way than selling exclusives.
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Optimum (Altice) uses modified vans. Don't know what the modifications cost. But that argument can be made for D* installers who should have a way to safely get up on roofs. I see cable guys on ladders all the time here and they use ladders that can be used by one man. I'm saying this again, D* and their contractors ignore OSHA ladder rules just like they ignored the high work rules. Wasn't that long ago D* changed the way they install dishes on roofs. I've never seen a D* contractor that followed the ladder rules or was aware of them.

    Rich
     
  15. mjwagner

    mjwagner Icon

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    I think NetFlix is doing more than just “OK”... ;-) Honestly, the most recent 4 or 5 shows that my wife and I really enjoyed were either NetFlix or Amazon originals. I think NetFlix/Amazon have captured the vast majority of our viewing time recently. Admittedly we don’t watch a lot of tv...we aren’t the “have tv on in the background” kind of viewers. We only really watch in the evenings and then it’s very specific shows.
     
  16. cebbigh

    cebbigh Icon

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    Thanks to all who have contributed to this very informative thread.

    I have had either Dish or Directv pretty much since the services became available. This month after dipping my toes in Directv Now for a while I took the plunge and cancelled Directv. But ... that is not the end of the story, as I am very tempted to come back now that i see HLG is a possibility, with my existing 2016 Samsung KS8000, if I obtain an HDFury to complete the HLG handshake. As far as I know, the only way to get HLG at the present time in the US is through Directv.

    If I knew Directv has plans to expand it's HLG programming I would feel a lot more comfortable locking myself into a new 2 year commitment. I hear what AT&T is saying about Directv Now carrying HLG, but I think given how tedious the rollout of their Cloud DVR has been, that it happening within the next 2 years is at best optimistic.

    I think the same can be said of the 5G based service.
    ---------------
    Took Directv up on their offer. It was really good. I do appreciate the discussion here as it touched on many of the aspects that I had been kicking around in making my decision.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018
  17. cypherx

    cypherx Hall Of Fame

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    The android based STB and voice remote look like that could be a hot feature. I think they need a little more power to do things like fancy tv apps, adaptive bitrate streaming, more flashy UI smoothness, etc. If it can run android the processor should be adequate. Its about time they consider a voice remote to compete with Xfinity X1 platform and Tivo VOX. I'd like to see a set top that can actually stream VOD because it has enough cpu power to do so and adapt to broadband conditions like Netflix and the other streaming services out there. Currently it seems that 75mbps isn't enough for DirecTV VOD, but it works great for Netflix, Youtube 4k, and others. I'd like to see their box have chromecast built in, netflix and other apps. I'd like to keep it simple and not have to switch inputs, or heck even need a lot of inputs on the TV anymore. A lot of these soundbars only have 1, 2, maybe 3 HDMI inputs at the most. If I can do all my streaming and live TV through 1 input and just have the other input for my Blue Ray player, that would be great. I could ditch the chromestick.

    They have to be careful making all video come through the Internet. I have 1tb cap and video will eat through that quickly. Even if this thing has more power that it can do HEVC on everything (not just 4k but HD and SD as well), the bandwidth savings are great but still eat into monthly caps. Plus there is no AT&T internet in our area, so they won't control the last mile. It will be up to the local ISP and QoS cannot be preserved across provider boundaries like that. Sure on AT&T's own U-Verse network they can tag video packets at a higher priority, but once you exit and need to transit off another backbone provider like Level3 or whomever to get to someone else's ISP, all that tagging is ignored or reset.
     
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