No Ground on receiver receptacle - Ground Dish or leave ungrounded?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by jf197d, Jul 28, 2021.

  1. jf197d

    jf197d New Member

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    Jul 28, 2021
    Hi all, I have an older house and I just had DTV installed. The problem I face is that some of the receptacles in the house have a ground and some do not. The receptacle that the main DTV receiver plugs into does not have a ground wire. There is a grounding rod outside, though I don't think it's buried that deep because there is so much rock beneath the soil that it'd be nearly impossible to drive in a grounding rod more than a few feet, and it feels loose when I try to move it around. So, being that as it is, would I be better off not having the coax from the dish connected to the grounding rod? I just don't want to create an unsafe situation because of a potential difference or ground loop, if my situation would cause either of those.
     
  2. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    that's is mandatory, see NEC code
     
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  3. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    you have no ground wire at IRD, so no ground loop for it
     
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  4. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    I would fish walls for ground wire to the power outlet with a IRD
     
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  5. codespy

    codespy Go Pack Go!!!! DBSTalk Club

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    Wait....what? TS has a common situation like millions of older homes in this country with only two prong receptacles. There is no issue with his setup (as described) as the IRD has only a two wire plug and it appears DirecTV properly grounded the dish antenna.

    Don’t mess with the dish grounding as that is a requirement of the National Electrical Code. If you have items/equipment with 3 prongs (3rd prong for equipment grounding) the easiest code compliant way to handle that is to replace the receptacle with a GFCI receptacle and put the sticker on it that says ‘Provides no equipment ground’. You cannot change it to a three prong non-GFCI receptacle unless you replace the branch circuit with a 3 conductor wiring method. The GFCI will provide protection in the event of a ground fault in the equipment.

    Eventually if you get a service upgrade done by a qualified electrician, they will update the grounding system as well to current standards.
     
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  6. jf197d

    jf197d New Member

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    Jul 28, 2021
    How about ESD, and leaving the system as it is? Is there a greater chance of ESD building up at the dish, coming through the coax and damaging my Genie if the receptacle is not grounded?
     
  7. codespy

    codespy Go Pack Go!!!! DBSTalk Club

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    Look at NEC 820.93 (we’re on the 2017 version here in WI)- ‘Grounding of the outer Conductive Shield of Coaxial Cable’.

    It goes on to say ‘Where the outer conductive shield of a coaxial cable is grounded, no other protective devices shall be required’.

    Also see everything in NEC 820.100(A) for the methods required.
     
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  8. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't matter whether the receptacle is grounded since all current Directv receivers use an ungrounded plug.

    Your loose grounding rod is a potentially serious safety issue though, you should have an electrician address that for you. if you can wiggle it around, it may be doing little or nothing as far as grounding your house electrical system.
     
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  9. codespy

    codespy Go Pack Go!!!! DBSTalk Club

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    There might still be some R15’s, etc. in the wild out there that people still have requiring a grounding type (3 prong) receptacle, so I was careful with my wording.:thumbsup:
     
  10. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    He said he just had Directv installed, so safe to say they did not get any R15s.
     
  11. codespy

    codespy Go Pack Go!!!! DBSTalk Club

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    No I realize that, that his was ‘just’ installed. It was a compounded response to Smith’s ‘electrical’ fixes and a reference that all current receivers use ungrounded plugs. There are still R15’s used by people out there. I’ve seen more people use 3 to 2 prong adaptors incorrectly for almost anything when only 2 prong receptacles are present, and provided the code compliant options when that occurs. It exists everywhere in the U.S.

    It turned into more of a PSA to help educate. I also noted there was nothing wrong with the setup of the TS. :thumbsup:
     
  12. Claude A Greiner

    Claude A Greiner DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    We can discuss grounding for days and get nowhere.

    The fact of the matter is the coax needs to be grounded to a water pipe which is connected to the main house electrical ground.

    If the receiver is not grounded, get a good surge protector. However the receiver gets grounded indirectly vis the coax cable.

    Really the ground makes no difference at all, however still got to ground due to code.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

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