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Observation of people on Internet apologizing for language skills

Discussion in 'The OT' started by dpeters11, May 16, 2012.

  1. May 17, 2012 #41 of 118
    SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    ^^ I wouldn't know a pronoun from a preposition from a participle or which one shouldn't be left dangling.
     
  2. May 18, 2012 #42 of 118
    TBlazer07

    TBlazer07 Grumpy Grampy

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    aight! :lol:
     
  3. May 18, 2012 #43 of 118
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    I hadn't thought of how much I disliked diagramming sentences for several decades! I was bad at it, but most of the rest of English classes was relatively easy for me.

    Now, there was a guy who got in a cab it Boston and asked the driver where he could get scrod.....
     
  4. May 18, 2012 #44 of 118
    BobaBird

    BobaBird EKB Editor

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    People's writing sometimes reveals that they don't understand the words they're using. We've already touched on "could of" used instead of "could've" which is the shortened version of "could have." One I don't get, even though the mistake is almost correct, is "another words" instead of "in other words."
     
  5. May 18, 2012 #45 of 118
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    This teacher loved us to be miserable. The sentences we had to diagram were the long ones, they didn't fit on a single piece of paper. He also loved to tell stories about using a CB radio to correct truckers grammar.
     
  6. May 18, 2012 #46 of 118
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    That's exactly where I am coming from in my thoughts. Not that people should speak and write only and always in pristine English, always obeying all the rules... but that people should care enough to want to know what the rules are.

    Some books, for example, are funnier when you know that the writing style is intentionally "ignorant" of certain rules of grammar. You get the "in joke" within the author's writing style more if you know it was done on purpose... as opposed to if you read it not knowing any better.

    I have no problems with people texting and forum-posting in broken English as long as they point gets across... but more and more we see that these are becoming primary methods of communication and thus the only place people write/speak... so then they are never aware of correct vs incorrect.

    To coin a phrase...

    Informality is the new formality.

    As such, informality needs to carry over some of the rules of the previous formality... otherwise the rules will be lost.
     
  7. May 20, 2012 #47 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    First time I saw it, I thought it was "lots of luck", which fits into many sentences as well as "laughing out loud".

    Rich
     
  8. May 20, 2012 #48 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Is this true? I've always pronounced the t and have never been corrected.

    Rich
     
  9. May 20, 2012 #49 of 118
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I think both are considered correct now, but originally the t was not pronounced.
     
  10. May 20, 2012 #50 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Huh. My dictionary (the thing talks!) doesn't pronounce the t.

    From Daily Writing Tips:

    The word often is a good example of the way our language goes round and round.

    Old English had the word oft, meaning “frequently.” It also had the word seldan, which meant “rarely,” and is the source of our word seldom.
    It is thought that oft morphed into often by analogy with seldan. Then seldan changed to seldum by analogy with another time word, hwilum, which meant “sometimes” or “once”. Over time, seldum came to be spelled seldom.
    The t in often continued to be pronounced until some time in the 15th century when a consonant simplification occurred in some words that had two or more consonants in a row. It was at this time that speakers stopped pronouncing the d in handkerchief and handsome, the p in raspberry, and the t in chestnut and often.

    John Walker’s Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, published in 1791 and still available in a 2001 reprint of the 1838 edition, stipulates that “in often and soften the t is silent.”

    By 1926, enough speakers were pronouncing the t in often to provoke this testy comment from H. W. Fowler in Modern English Usage:
    [the pronunciation of the t in often] is practised by two oddly consorted classes—the academic speakers who affect a more precise enunciation than their neighbours…& the uneasy half-literates who like to prove that they can spell….”

    In 1996, an editor of the OED2, R. W. Burchfield, avoided censuring the “t” pronunciation in this conciliatory comment:
    Nowadays…many standard speakers use both [AWF-in] and [AWF-tin], but the former pronunciation is the more common of the two.

    However, writer on language Charles Harrington Elster, in The Big Book Of Beastly Mispronunciations: The Complete Opinionated Guide For The Careful Speaker(1999), rejects such compromise:
    I would caution those who might be consoled by the comments of … Burchfield to heed the admonitions of the past and avoid pronouncing the t.
    Elster supports his position with an appeal to analogy:
    analogy is entirely unsupportive: no one pronounces the t in soften, listen, fasten, moisten, hasten, chasten, christen, and Christmas—so, once and for all, let’s do away with the eccentric AWF-tin.

    For the fun of it, let’s poll DWT readers (if you are reading this via email you’ll need to visit the site to cast your vote):
    How Do You Pronounce "Often"? (Poll Closed)

    I DON'T pronounce the t in "often". 48.95% (582 votes)


    I DO pronounce the t in "often". 51.05% (607 votes)



    Total Votes: 1,189
    Create Your Own Poll

    Not trying to provoke an argument, but I briefly looked up the proper pronunciation of often and it appears that either way is acceptable. Sorta.....:lol:

    Rich
     
  11. May 20, 2012 #51 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I think I've been doing quite well since you spanked me about that....:lol:

    Thanx,

    Rich
     
  12. May 20, 2012 #52 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    When every sentence is started with "Dude!" it does get tiresome.

    Rich
     
  13. May 20, 2012 #53 of 118
    SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Dude, really?
     
  14. May 20, 2012 #54 of 118
    SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    I've been so tempted to link a few recent posters to this thread. Some of their posts are making my eyes bleed.
     
  15. May 20, 2012 #55 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    You have said it before! Sometime last summer. Or was that Richierich that said it?

    Rich
     
  16. May 20, 2012 #56 of 118
    TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    I like it when like people use like in like every other word in like a sentence, like when they like talk, like do you know what I mean, like why does it have to be like that, like you know, like whats up with that? :D

    And I love when people say "axed" when they're trying to say "asked".
     
  17. May 20, 2012 #57 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Ok is incorrect according to my spellchecker. OK is correct according to my spellchecker. My dictionary changed "Ok" to "OK" to define it. Okay is certainly a word. I think.

    Rich
     
  18. May 20, 2012 #58 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    My son's been a cop for twenty years and he calls other cops "cops". My mother was a policewoman and she called a cop a "cop". I asked my son if the term was derogatory and he didn't think so. Said they all call each other cops.

    Rich
     
  19. May 20, 2012 #59 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    From what I've read, French is a dying language because it hasn't been allowed to evolve as English has, so some degree of change seems to be good for any language or it stagnates. But to evolve to the level of text messages that take me quite a while to decipher seems to be carrying evolution a bit to far.

    Rich
     
  20. May 20, 2012 #60 of 118
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Whatever happened to Ebonics? Was controversial and then just went away.

    Rich
     

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