Pay TV is changing rapidly

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Bedford11, Nov 22, 2016.

  1. Dec 9, 2016 #101 of 178
    chances14

    chances14 Member

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    they will most likely cherry pick areas where they will deploy it, just like AT&T will do
     
  2. Dec 9, 2016 #102 of 178
    Aridon

    Aridon Mentor

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    Let's be real here. The vast majority of people live in Cell phone coverage and even have broadband access. While it is true the Rural folks get left out they are a fairly tiny sub group. Directv and Dish will be around for a long time and if they aren't and you still don't have Internet well that is what happens when you live in the sticks. That is why you don't have other services. You choose

    2016 Broadband Progress Report

    10% lack access to 25mbs. That means 90% have access. In addition you don't need 25mbs for streaming. 8mbs cricket unlimited does just fine and is $55 a month for a good chunk of that 10% and WISP or other types of wireless will be deployed. You were never going to get a fiber line to your house regardless and even city folk aren't going to see fiber because just about everyone knows that the future has little to do with running wires to every house in the USA.

    Anyway, progress isn't going to stop because some people choose to live in the sticks. You'll still have access to satellite for the foreseeable future and if that should ever no longer be profitable to deliver you TV service you just won't get it. Just like water, sewer and other services.
     
  3. Dec 9, 2016 #103 of 178
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    They won't attempt to serve those areas ...
    90% of population is not 90% of geography.
     
  4. Dec 9, 2016 #104 of 178
    KyL416

    KyL416 Hall Of Fame

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    It's NOT just the "sticks' and "rural" areas that are stuck without broadband. There's many suburbs where the only option is 3 Mbps DSL or less and cable isn't an option. Heck, BOSTON of all cities doesn't have FiOS. Verizon wanted to force DSL only areas to expensive capped wireless after Sandy destroyed some of their copper network on areas on Long Island where they had ZERO plans to deploy FiOS. There's STILL areas on Long Island beyond Optimum's fiber network where they're stuck on a 500 MHz network with 60 analog channels and no HD.

    Cable companies reporting entire areas where they have a franchise instead of only reporting the streets actually wired for their service also pollute the results. Telcos do the same thing by reporting places where their fiber network "passes", but not which buildings are actually wired for the service. (Which kind of matters in major cities since many people are renting in apartment buildings and not houses they own) For DSL they report the highest speed available in an area, even though only people close to the CO get those speeds. (Especially Verizon, where not only have they stopped expanding their fiber network, they also limit areas on RTs to 3 Mbps or less, even though there's nothing technical limiting their fiber fed RTs to deliver the same speeds as people connected directly to the CO get)

    Not everyone "chooses" to live in the sticks either, some have to for work related reasons, others were priced out of other areas and it's the only place they could afford to live comfortably and start a family, instead of spending 90% of their paycheck on rent for a one room apartment in a city.

    Also, yeah you don't need 25 mbps, if only 2 or 3 people are watching at the same time. But you need a lot more than that if you want to replicate a 5 room installation and use the internet for something besides watching TV at the same time. Or you don't want the TV to start buffering like crazy and dipping to a resolution lower than SD because someone else turned on their PS4 or XBone and have 20 GB+ worth of updates start downloading, at the same time someone else is binge watching House of Cards or Orange is the New Black in 4K on Netflix.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016
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  5. Dec 9, 2016 #105 of 178
    Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    Providers will be there for sure, remember the coming IOT ,Smart Electric Grid, Pipelines, connected cars,(AT&T already has 8 million) Farmers, Oil, Gas, Renewable Energy producers, Rural manufacturers, Infrastructure, Forestry, etc,. etc will be needing service.
    Just one autonomous car will use 4,000 GB of data/day
    Self-driving cars will soon create significantly more data than people—3 billion people’s worth of data, according to Intel
    At some point within the next two to three years, consumers will come to expect car connectivity to be standard

    Links
    One autonomous car will use 4,000 GB of data per day

    How connected cars are turning into revenue-generating machines

    AT&T, Verizon,TMobile ready with 4.5G LTE (nothing to wait on 4.5G technology is here already.).
    Rural spectrum already in pocket.
    Watch 2017,
    Link
    Mobile Broadband Forum: 4.5G WTTH Helping Accelerate Next Generation Fixed Wireless - Telecompetitor
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016
  6. chances14

    chances14 Member

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    if the fcc's broadband map is any indication, they don't have a clue how many people actually lack broadband access. example, Their map shows my entire township as being able to get 25mbps cable from charter, when in reality there isn't a single household that is served by charter in our township.
     
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  7. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    Lets not forget the synergies this will create for AT&T.

    Overnight reports from the US suggest that AT&T will win a multi-billion dollar contract to build a nationwide first-responder network that will also provide the company with 20MHz of mobile spectrum.

    If AT&T does win the contract the decision is likely to give the company substantial spectrum that it can use for other mobile services, so long as they can be reallocated to emergency services when and where needed.

    AT&T tipped to win 25-year US emergency network deal
     
  8. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    I'm skeptical of their claim that AT&T will be able to use 'unused' capacity in the area reserved for emergency services for their own purposes. Since it is government owned, local governments will come up with their own ideas for how the unused capacity can be used.

    How it will benefit AT&T is in tower locations. In order to cover an area for emergency services they may need additional towers. They might get permission to build towers on government property, like highway easements, parks etc. where permission normally isn't granted if it is necessary to fill in a dead spot. I'm sure they'd be allowed to put cellular or fixed wireless antennas on those towers in addition to what's needed for emergency services, so in the long run they may end up the best cellular coverage. Plus the cost of running fiber to rural towers would be subsidized by the need to do so for the emergency services contract.
     
  9. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    Free and Fast
    A broke preacher on the poor side of town can muster 20,000 people on his Free network.
    In the new upcoming era of deregulation where 5, 6 of the Big providers are able to provide wireless/wired internet to consumers, even if they wanted to collude on high pricing, the free markets have an answer. Let the deregulation begin! Open free/cheap with no throttle, DirectTV Now and all the others services flow right in, Competition is good for the consumer. Who knows what new technology will provide for the consumer in the next few years, things are happening very rapidly.

    Terabit-per-second network targets Houston launch


    Pittsburgh startup to 'democratize' broadband with free wireless Internet | FierceTelecom

    Meta Mesh | Wireless Networking for All.

    PittMesh | Pittsburgh Community Wireless

    AT&T CEO Confident Regulatory Problems Will Melt Away

    Why AT&T Is So Excited For President Trump



    AT&T has set a timeline to phase out satellites and set-top boxes

    AT&T wants to be the CIO of your life.

    http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/b...ort-at-t-has-set-a-timeline-to-phase-out.html
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2016
  10. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    More journalists recycling already discredited stories from other journalists about AT&T phasing out satellite in 3 to 5 years. What a load of *********.
     
  11. Jason Nipp

    Jason Nipp Analog Geek in a Digital World Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    That's why I have no faith in journalism at this time in my life.
     
  12. CTJon

    CTJon Godfather

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    I love the free stuff - nothing is free - it might not be detailed out in a bill but you would pay in your tax bill and knowing how efficient government is - probably actually cost you twice as much as it would from a private competitor. But it sounds good as election issue.
     
  13. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    I agree, Journalism is Dead.
    A good journalist would have poked around behind the scenes and seek out people in the know. People like Ergen, the big man at Dish who said that the bulk of TV would be internet based within 5 years, people like Bezos the big man at Amazon who said it is better to cannibalize your own products than wait for a competitor to do it.

    The Big Players (non traditional) are entering the TV market, mucho more tech savy in the internet sector. AT&T is going to have to do what they have to do in order to thrive in this brave new market.

    Google, Amazon, Facebook, etc. etc. do not have a legacy TV service they have to protect. It is going to get bloody for some providers/sectors as they battle for king of streaming TV.

    Here's Why AT&T's DirecTV Now Service Isn't as Good as It Could Be
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2016
  14. chances14

    chances14 Member

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    CEO's say all kinds of things to satisfy shareholders and investors. Doesn't mean it will actually happen
     
  15. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    You got that right!
     
  16. Aridon

    Aridon Mentor

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    Seems right to me. I mean Directv certainly doesn't NEED now right this second. They are still the king of pay tv but the writing is on the wall. They know full and well they will cannibalize their pay tv with an online offering. At first it won't be much but it is pretty clear TV is changing considerably long term. So it seems the "better to cannibalize your own service than have a competitor do it" is exactly what D* is doing right now.

    As for satellites getting phased out in 5 years. That is just stupid and agreed.
     
  17. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    DirectTV Now is now Free of charge. Talk about an evolving competitive market, just heating up, wait till the other giants enter, going to be fun to watch.

    T-Mobile trolls AT&T, says it'll pick up tab for rival's new TV streaming service | Technology | Dallas News

    Another entrant into the streaming TV market.
    Streaming Service fuboTV Pacts with Fox, NBCU, A+E & Others - TVUSA

    Don't look at this
    Comcast CFO Says Company's Cooking Up Streaming TV Service

    It's happening right in front of our eyes.
    Crain's Detroit Business : Subscription Center
    Streaming TV Will Put Pressure on Content Providers -- The Motley Fool

    Will be great to get all these international channels via streaming, won't be long till it hits the U.S.
    Sky, Cisco launch streaming OTT platform - Broadband TV News

    This is so true, whoever can create the easy to navigate interface will be a winner.
    "The company that creates the most user-friendly and personalized service will have a vital edge in the race to win millions of viewers who are dropping cable and satellite packages and their often clunky channel guides, analysts said."
    "Given the amount of choice you have today, it is amazing that no one has built a better recommendation engine for (traditional) TV," said Michael Nathanson, an analyst with MoffettNathanson.

    The stakes are high. Over the past six years, the amount of time people aged 18 to 24, part of advertisers' most coveted demographic, spent watching traditional TV declined 42 percent, according to a presentation earlier this month by Business Insider Chief Executive Henry Blodget at the Ignition 2016 Conference.

    Live TV streaming providers tap into viewer's tastes
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2016
  18. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Did you bother to see what is actually free? It's not the exact same thing as DIRECTV now that you pay for. Not even in the same realm.
     
  19. Bedford11

    Bedford11 Member

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    Get out of the way and let the free markets decide, the perfect storm combined with emerging tech. DirectTV Now will do very well under this new environment.

    "He applauded President-elect Trump’s call for the elimination of two regulations for every new one created.

    Among the broad changes O’Rielly outlined in his speech included a move to undo certain policies; the clearing away of regulatory underbrush; the move to develop a pro-growth, pro-innovation agenda; and the overhauling the older commission processes.

    O’Rielly called for the updating of existing media ownership rules, which he called “relics of the nascent media world of a bygone era,” and he reiterated his call for the elimination for broadcasters to keep paper correspondence files."

    O’Rielly: Pro-Growth, Pro-Innovation Agenda on FCC Horizon
     
  20. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

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    Do you really expect the "free market" to decide in your favor?

    It is not the FCC that is preventing all of the fantasies you promote. It is the industry. As already outlined, making your dreams come to pass would require MORE government overreach and interference - not less regulations.

    Left entirely up to the industry and "free market" forces we could end up with a worse situation than we have today. Be careful what you wish for.
     
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