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Problem with monoprice 5-rca component cables

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by 420benz, Feb 2, 2011.

  1. 420benz

    420benz Member

    640
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    Dec 19, 2006
    Georgia
    In all du-respect i am sure everything you guy's are saying is correct,BUT: I have no idea what you are talking about.I think my question #35 is a simple one.Good idea/Bad idea?
     
  2. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Sep 16, 2006
    Its not if #1: the outlet you connect it to has a pass through designed for a second cable, and #2, the wire is entirely inside the wall to the new outlet (or goes through the wall to the attic or under the house). Then it would just be a normal in wall extension outlet. If any part of it is in the living area, its not.
     
  3. 420benz

    420benz Member

    640
    1
    Dec 19, 2006
    Georgia
    Great! Someone who speaks my language.That is what i plan to do.THANKS
     
  4. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

    23,050
    1,165
    Nov 13, 2006
    Try getting a surge protector that has line conditioning. That may fix your issue. Also, make sure you never run your component cables right next to and in parallel with your power cords. Keep them separated as much as possible, and try and make them cross as perpendicular as possible... It can help, lots...
     
  5. eakes

    eakes Godfather

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    Sep 21, 2007
    While using an extension cord or installing a 'wired in' circuit will eliminate your present problem, that does not fix the basic problem. You have a ground potential difference between the two AC circuits, this could be a lethal problem! Extending one circuit via an extension cord (or hard wired) to the vicinity of the other circuit brings that potential difference in close proximity of each other. The ground potential difference could be very dangerous. Should someone find themselves between those two grounds (touch the TV set while also touching a lamp plugged in to the other circuit) they could get quite a shock.

    You should have an electrician check out your AC circuits to discover the location of the problem and repair it.
     
  6. drpjr

    drpjr Icon

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    Nov 23, 2007
    Sakatomatoes...
    Was the "different" outlet you plugged the TV into on the same circuit as the receiver? IF.. not it was probably on the same 110v leg (buss bar) in your electrical panel as the receiver. Again IF... this is the case you could swap the TV circuitbreaker wire in the panel with one (same amp size) that is on the same leg as the receiver. That will give you the same result as the extension cord. A lot of ifs, but could save a lot of work.
     
  7. 420benz

    420benz Member

    640
    1
    Dec 19, 2006
    Georgia
    Are you talking about the Ground wire?
     
  8. drpjr

    drpjr Icon

    763
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    Nov 23, 2007
    Sakatomatoes...
    No. It's possible/probable that your house wiring has the TV and Receiver on different 110v legs/buss in the panel. That could be causing the issue. Having them both on the same leg (even if not the same circuit) could solve the problem. I am suggesting doing that easily in the panel without having to run new wires or circuits.

    When you fixed the problem did you plug the TV into the same circuit as the Receiver?
    And have you ever replaced a defective circuitbreaker?


    .
     
  9. ctorg

    ctorg Cool Member

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    0
    Mar 2, 2006
    I searched for the exact same green/purple line issue (no humming though). The TV and H24 are on the same circuit, different plug. Strange issue is - when I switched from the component out off of the H24 and used my HDMI (from bluray player) to TV - the green/purple issue goes away? Any thoughts? Otherwise, I'll just order another HDMI cable and snake it to the TV.
     
  10. 420benz

    420benz Member

    640
    1
    Dec 19, 2006
    Georgia
    I spoke to my son who owns an HVAC Co. and gave me an easy fix. I plugged the TV into a two prong adapter with no ground and all problems went away.
     
  11. Combat Medic

    Combat Medic Legend

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    Jul 27, 2007
    OK, you have now verified the problem. Now you need to fix the problem by figuring out why two outlets have different ground potentials.
     
  12. 420benz

    420benz Member

    640
    1
    Dec 19, 2006
    Georgia
    The house is 11yr's old. What is the worse case scenario if i do nothing?
     
  13. JonW

    JonW Icon

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    Dec 21, 2006
    I still think you should try some inexpensive passive component to UTP baluns.

    I haven't used them personally, but as long as each signal goes through a transformer, it should isolate the grounds and avoid ground loops issues.

    It's a coding violation to run an extension cord through the wall. You should only be messing with low voltage wires.

    And like I already pointed out early in the thread, a two-prong adapter (aka cheater plug) is a great way to tell if you have a ground loop problem, but using one permanently is a safety violation. The purpose of the 3rd prong is to ground the chasis of equipment so if the equipment develops an internal short, the circuit breaker will blow, as opposed to electrocuting someone in your house.

    It is possible there is a fault in your electrical wiring, and if you have any doubts due to age/sloppiness of wiring you should have it checked out; but often the issue just comes down to the fact that the two circuits in your house may have drastically different loads all creating different "flavors" of electrical noise. Cross wire the circuits, and that noise is no longer naturally rejected, but injected. An 11 yr old house should be fine, but strange things can happen ... like if someone on a riding lawn mower was to cut right through an earth ground connection.
     
  14. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

    9,139
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    Sep 16, 2006
    The problem is, it is not the cables that are causing his problem. It just manifests itself onscreen because he is using analog video. In order to isolate the ground loop, he would need to also run the coax through an isolation transformer, network/phone lines, power, everything. If the problem was being introduced by the cables, your suggestion would solve it, but the hum bars are being generated in the power circuit. Isolating the interconnect between the video source and video display would then cause that power to be present on the cases of those two, so anyone touching any metal on the TV, and also touching the amp or DVR, would be subjecting themselves to a mild to hefty shock if any items in the chain do not have grounded power plugs. The safer thing would be to ground all the cases together with ground wire, and then ground that wire to the power ground, if one didnt want to fix the problem.

    I had this same exact problem when using an existing two wire wall plug for some components, and a new two wire plus ground three wire outlet in the media closet. I immediately noticed 60hz hum bars, and there was a 60V power measured on my meter between my DVR coax shield. Turned out the two outlets were on different legs of the 240V incoming circuit. Switching the breaker from L1 to L2 for the new outlet solved the hum problem. It would also have fixed it by running a separate ground wire from the breaker box to the ungrounded outlet, and replacing it with a three wire outlet.

    I install commercial coffee equipment, and its not uncommon to measure 120V or more between the steel case of the coffee maker, and other appliances nearby. I always check this to make sure no one gets electrocuted. It usually turns out to be a ground wire missing (someone installed a three wire outlet to accomodate the three wire plugs, without bothering to run the ground), or someone reversed the L1 and Neutral wires in the plug. Better safe than sorry. If you have a problem, you should get it fixed, not work around it.
     
  15. JonW

    JonW Icon

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    Dec 21, 2006
    You never violate the rule of a single point ground. You don't run your own ground wires between equipment on different circuits. You don't run an extension cord inside walls.

    As long as everything is connected via 3-prong connectors and the house was wired correctly, there will not be a significant or unsafe voltage differential between the equipment.

    Noise is always present in any electrical cable, wire, or circuit. For the most part the noise on a signal will cancel with the noise on the ground. When you essentially wire uncommon grounds together with a cable, this is no longer possible - hence a "ground loop" occurs.

    If the two pieces of equipment are isolated via a balun, then they won't be sharing a ground anymore. The only case where this won't work is if one of the pieces of equipment has a significantly elevated ground voltage (many volts), but this won't happen if they share a common single point ground.
     

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