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Programming Surprise

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Andrew Sullivan, Nov 1, 2018.

  1. Nov 1, 2018 #1 of 23
    Andrew Sullivan

    Andrew Sullivan Member

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    In watching American Horror Story on FX I was surprised to see the F word dropped. More than once. I understand that cable shows aren't quite as constrained as the networks but still, the F word? This Channel is part of most base channel packages. It's not a Premium Channel. How do they get away with what was once considered absolutely no no language?
     
  2. Nov 1, 2018 #2 of 23
    KyL416

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    Contrary to popular belief, cable channels in the US don't have any content regulations like broadcast does. American Horror Story is rated TV-MA for a reason.

    Back in the analog era the basic cable channels played it safe since it was very common for kids and family rooms to have a basic cable ready TV that didn't support parental controls, but now it's extremely rare to have a situation where you don't need a settop box for older TVs.
     
  3. Nov 1, 2018 #3 of 23
    RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Was it self imposed rules since it’s a cable channel, I don’t think the FCC has regulation for that.
     
  4. Nov 1, 2018 #4 of 23
    Andrew Sullivan

    Andrew Sullivan Member

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    It must have been self imposed. I don't recall hearing that word used a few years ago. It doesn't bother me it just surprised me.
     
  5. Nov 1, 2018 #5 of 23
    KyL416

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    Yeah mostly self imposed. Like there's nothing stopping Disney Channel from airing a movie like Deadpool uncensored regulatory wise as long as they give it the proper rating, but for obvious reasons they wouldn't do that. Freeform on the otherhand has at least one S-bomb on many of their primetime originals like Cloak & Dagger, even though thanks to an eternal clause from the CBN Family days they still have to air the 700 Club every night.

    Back in the day though channels like TBS and WGN had to comply with broadcast regulations since they were still mostly simulcasts of their broadcast counterpart outside of syndex replacement programming. So shows like WCW Thunder and Saturday Night had to be much tamer compared to TNT's Nitro, just how UPN's SmackDown had to censor words and camera angles that they didn't have to on Monday Night Raw.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
  6. Nov 1, 2018 #6 of 23
    James Long

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    Most of the non-premium networks impose their own standards that are closer to broadcast standards. I have noticed that all television standards have been relaxed as society accepts harsher content. For example, a few years ago you would not see a middle finger on Comedy Central. Obscene, indecent and profane are the categories the FCC uses.

    Obscene, Indecent and Profane Broadcasts
    FX has a history of being one of the more permissive networks. They would pass content that other networks would omit.

    It is important to note that the definition of profane (grossly offensive) is based on community standards. As community standards change what is profane changes. Television has moved from standards where even a married couple were not shown to be sharing a bed (Ricky and Lucy vs The Bradys) to modern standards where everything except genitalia and boobs is shown on broadcast television (although for some reason butt cracks are now usually blurred where a decade ago a bare butt was shown).
     
  7. Nov 1, 2018 #7 of 23
    NR4P

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    FCC does not regulate cable and SAT channel content. They can regulate OTA due to any OTA receiver can receive it. But the premise with Cable/Sat channels are that nothing is free, so you entered into a paid agreement to receive the channel.
     
  8. Nov 2, 2018 #8 of 23
    slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    They reason they regulate OTA has nothing to do with "any OTA receiver can receive it", it is because it uses public airwaves. Being able to exert some control over the content is part of the deal TV stations get for getting their channel frequency assignments for free. As the FCC auctions that turned channels 70-82, then 52-69 and most recently 38-51 into cellular bands - which raised tens of billions - showed, that's some pretty valuable property they're sitting on.
     
  9. Nov 2, 2018 #9 of 23
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The FCC also regulates satellite. See the link and quotes from the FCC website in my post above.
     
  10. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    It regulates satellites but AFAIK not the content (other than the requirement for a certain percentage of channels being public interest)
     
  11. trainman

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    I don't think anyone's specifically mentioned the most important thing here...

    FX can now find advertisers that are okay with it, which would probably not have been the case a few years ago.
     
  12. Andrew Sullivan

    Andrew Sullivan Member

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    I don't have kids and personally the language doesn't bother me but. These days it's pretty difficult to monitor what your kids watch 24/7. So they can't show a full frontal naked breast because heaven forbid who doesn't know what a nipple looks like. But they can use the F word 20 times in a 60 minute tv show. You notice I use the letter F for f word and everybody knows what it means. But what do you say when your 8 year old asked you what fuck means.
     
  13. KyL416

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    That's what parental controls are for. All the programs with explicit language are either rated TV-MA or TV-14 L. If you're going to let your 8 year old watch TV unsupervised you should at least block anything higher than TV-PG.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018
  14. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Most of the time I have heard it used it doesn't mean a sexual encounter. I learned that in junior high when girls would say "f you" and never followed through with their offer to "f" me (not that any of them were the class of woman I would have sex with - but I digress).

    The next time you hear the F word 20 times in 60 minutes count how many are an actual reference to sex and how many are just a random utterance. Are people saying s*** referring to a bowel movement or the product thereof? When they say *** damn are they really praying that God would curse someone or something for all eternity? Probably not. They are, as Patrick and Sponge Bob would call them, "sentence enhancers".



    I tried that and lost a lot of "non-rated" programming. Suitable for children (or at least young adults and above) but with no rating applied the receiver erred on the side of caution.
     
  15. KyL416

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    I'm not sure about Dish's equipment, but DirecTV's parental controls has a seperate "Allow No Rating" option in the Ratings Limits section.
     
  16. coota

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    Some F/X programs have been using the F word for a couple of years.
     
  17. Delroy E Walleye

    Delroy E Walleye AllStar

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    That Happy program or whatever it was called on SyFy prime time some months back dropped more F-Bombs than you could shake a stick at.

    (Also no shortage of graphic violence.)
     
  18. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Apple has a set of guidelines for the new shows it has under development that they be 'family friendly' so no F bombs, no graphic violence, etc. Safe to say Disney's upcoming streaming service will be similar. So if you don't like that stuff, don't watch those shows and sign up with Disney & Apple when their upcoming streaming services are made available. Vote with your feet.

    If you don't like f bombs but watch the shows anyway you are contributing to their ratings and making it more likely more shows will have them in the future.
     
  19. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I wish there were a family friendly option for some of the shows I like. The compromise is to hear a few f bombs and crude humor to hear the desired content. It would probably be better to do without.
     
  20. Delroy E Walleye

    Delroy E Walleye AllStar

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    Agree those that don't like shouldn't watch.

    And (as already stated) shows are clearly rated and there are such things as parental controls.

    (Now all that's left to wonder is just how soon it will be untill more "nudity" than just men's butts will be shown on "basic" cable. Probably the only "envelope" left to push...)

    Edit to add: I seem to recall that even many decades ago Canadian OTA television would air R-rated movies completely uncensored.
     

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