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Puerto Rico Vote Endorses Statehood

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Drucifer, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Hopefully their representatives would be in DC. With that many people a few of them should be able to hold office (other than the ones who are only in town to hold office representing somewhere else).

    The needs of the capital and the federal government would need to be met unhindered by state laws. Costs that are there because of the people of Washington DC should be borne by the people of DC ... with some federal help (just like the rest of the country). And just like the rest of the country some of their taxes would go to support the federal government.

    One vote from somewhere else in the nation ... it may work out to be a wash.

    But that is a "good reason" to block PR statehood ... several electoral votes and congressional seats going to a community..
     
  2. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Certainly not Alaska, unless just from a natural resources perspective.

    Hawaii has a larger population, but is really out there geographically speaking,
     
  3. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    Any word on what's happening in Guam?
     
  4. yosoyellobo

    yosoyellobo Icon

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  5. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    You might as well include non-voters and lower that percentage more.

    Voting is "of those expressing an opinion, x number of people say A." While some might run a campaign to "not vote", such a vote should NOT be counted as a yes or no, it should be counted as an "I don't care" or a "whatever" vote. And at the end of an election "no vote" really isn't a vote at all.
     
  6. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I think part of the problem is the choices. What do people choose if they want to stay the way they are? They weren't given that choice.
     
  7. djlong

    djlong Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, they were given that choice. It was a 2-part question. Part 1 was "Do you want to change". Part 2 was "If 'change' wins, what is your preferential outcome".

    People who wanted to stay a Commonwealth simply voted "No" to the first question.
     
  8. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    But it seems people that voted Yes, then made a choice....at least seemed potentially confusing.
     
  9. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

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    The DC Statehood Green Party would be very interested to hear that.
     
  10. yosoyellobo

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    I miss that yesterday. Estado Libre Asociado Soberano is a form of independence with citizenship "have your cake and eat it too". That plus Independence on the ballot insured a no vote. In Puerto Rico both sides are claiming victory.
     
  11. greatwhitenorth

    greatwhitenorth Godfather

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    Lived in Guam for 6 months back in the 70's...nothing is happening in Guam and nothing will probably ever happen in Guam:lol: Beautiful island though...
     
  12. SamC

    SamC Hall Of Fame

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    PR - Economics:

    PR's economy is based on a "cafeteria" relationship with the USA (pick and choose). Laws that benefit it apply (inside the US customs zone, passport free travel, etc), laws that would harm it do not (much of OSHA, EPA, Jones Act, etc) and other laws have a economically normalized variaton (welfare, Medicaid, food stamps, minimum wage, prevailing wage, etc). This is because, no matter what measure you use, PR is about 60% as wealthy as the poorest state (Mississippi).

    This has fostered an economy (outside of tourism) based on making things at the lower cost that affords, but then "importing" it to the mainland without duty. Parmacuticals, medical devices, and alcohol among others.

    The Constitution says that a new state is admitted "on the same basis as the original States", which means that every single law would have to apply. This would devistate the economy.

    PR - politics: PR is about the size of Oklahoma, meaning it would get 5 congressmen (and thus 7 electoral votes). Obviously you can just look at the party situation over the years (safe to assume that PR would be all to most all democrats) and see the difference that would make. Also, while there is no set limit on the number of congress seats, the past practice has been to add new seats only until the next Census, and then return to 435, which would mean that 5 states would lose votes. Alabama, Hawaii, Maine, Minnesota, and Georgia if this happened before the 2010 Census.

    PR - TV: Hey, this is a TV board. Most copyrights and trademarks treat PR as a seperate "country". MLB does, for example. This would have to change.

    DC - Constitution. DC cannot be admitted as a state, since the Constitution requires the Congress to "exercise exclusive jurisdiction" over the seat of government. Of course, the size is not defined, so they could reduce the District to the actual tourist stuff around the mall, and make the rest a state (or better yet give it back to Maryland). Further DC cannot be given a vote in the House, because the Constitution specifically apportions members "to the states". Changing this would require a Constitutional amendment. Senators are more problematical, since the Constitution forbids a change to "equal sufferage in the Senate" (which this would be, changing from 2 for each state, to 2 for each state plus 2 for a non-state) without a the consent of the state, meaning all 50 (or 51 by then) states would have to agree.

    Weird story I saw on line so it has to be true. France, which has none of those Constitutional problems, has always given presidential votes and seats in both houses to its varrious remaining colonies (St. Martin, Tahiti, etc). That was not good enough so they have now broken the rest of the world up into 7 disticts. For example the US, Canada, and non-French Carribbean is a district, which elects its own represenative. In other words the first voting distict made up entirely of land that is NOT in the jurisdiction of the involve country. This has upset, of all people, the Canadians. They say this violates the terms of the French Surrender (if that is not redundent) from what Americans call the French and Indian War in the 1760s.
     
  13. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    Sort of Vatican City-like. Were only the government buildings are included in DC. And resident areas return to the state(s) they were taken from.
     

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