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Refusal to Install Direct TV -- Roof Pitch

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by DukePA, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    That's exactly the answer. Neither sat company has ever release anything but the most general guidelines regarding their sat installs. There's nothing approaching a "specification" anywhere. And the vast differences in local construction across the country would make doing so very difficult.

    Your neighbors with the dish on the top of their roof may have also been rebuffed by DirecTV's inhouse techs and had to go outside the system to get their dishes there. Or they may have gotten techs from a contractor who was subsequently fired for breaking the rules. But just because someone else will do it doesn't mean it's okay to do. Customers try that with me all the time and get nowhere. I used to have 10 contractors in my area. There are now only 2, and I'm one of them, *for a reason*.

    The simple fact is: the included "standard installation" has many limitations, and this is just one of them. If you want something above and beyond, you'll have to pay for someone to do it for you. And don't expect the hugely-discounted "standard installation" type rates, because the people who will do this work will usually be the ones to can do it right, but doing it right isn't cheap.
     
  2. DukePA

    DukePA Cool Member

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    I have confirmed that my neighbors had the installtion done by the authorized Direct TV installer under a similar agreement with Direct TV. All I am doing is pointing out the inconsistency in Direct TV or the installers policy. My guess is that they do not, as you indicate, have a clear policy on this. So people like myself who sign up for their packages have no clue that they may getting into an agreement that cannot be fufilled. If i see neighbors with have the service, I assume that I too can get a similar service.
     
  3. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    There's always going to be that fool that wants to be a superhero and get that install in no matter what. Be it to look good to his boss or the customer, or he had to make a choice of doing the job, getting paid and feeding the kids, or passing and going hungry for the day.

    D* and E* techs are not roofers, they don't have the proper gear to do much roof work. They certainly don't get paid anywhere close to what roofing companies pay their guys to be up there.

    If you do find some fool to put it up there, I'd strongly suggest a dish heater, as I can guarentee you that no one that doesn't have a death wish will service that dish with snow on the roof.

    If it's no accessible from a ladder or from the ground, it really shouldn't go in. If it does, be aware that you may have a hell of a time getting service down the road.
     
  4. DukePA

    DukePA Cool Member

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    I am ok with this, but is this Direct TV's explicit policy. I have seen no disclaimers as such, but maybe I missed it. When I called Direct TV yesterday, they indicated that there is not policy prohibiting a tech from leaving the ladder to climb the roof to install the dish. Since this has occurred, I started looking around other neighborhoods and have seen direct tv on roof that would require a tech to leave the roof. Maybe it was done by an outside entity not associated with Direct TV. My guess is that some were done by the authorized installer and once that occurs those individuals should be entitled compensation if later on they need service and are denied so because it is on the roof. You cannot start someone service under false pretentions and then deny them a remedy because of one tech's poor judement or a vauge policy. And to be clear, I would agree that if the service was needed during a snowstorm or ice on the roof it is fair for Direct TV or the service company to indicate that repair can only occur in safe conditions or when the roof was clear from ice/snow.
     
  5. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Duke, policies are tough to write for something like this. I can think of a very steep roof which happened to have peaks and troughs at just the right places, so that my installer and I felt was safe for him to go onto. There were others that were maybe a bit less steep but the access wasn't as good that we didn't do. It also depends on the guy. A company might have had Mr. Fearless on the staff two years ago but doesn't now.

    I know this doesn't seem fair, and maybe it isn't. But I would ask you to step back and ask yourself what are you doing here? Do you want to subscribe with DirecTV to get your TV programming? If there is another pathway to installation that you haven't had a chance to explore yet, and it was possible to get the dish where you want it on the roof for a reasonable amount of money (you can define reasonable), would you still do it?
     
  6. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

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    If you want to believe some CSR thats in ZERO danger all nice and safe in cube somewhere be my guest. They won't make things that black and white. They don't want it that way. Each and every install across the country is different. A blanket policy won't work for a laundry list of options. Even if there were, there will always be some jackass that wants to be a hero and get it in.

    You can't fix stupid.
     
  7. DukePA

    DukePA Cool Member

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    I know this doesn't seem fair, and maybe it isn't. But I would ask you to step back and ask yourself what are you doing here? Do you want to subscribe with DirecTV to get your TV programming? If there is another pathway to installation that you haven't had a chance to explore yet, and it was possible to get the dish where you want it on the roof for a reasonable amount of money (you can define reasonable), would you still do it?[/QUOTE]

    Ideally, I would like to be with Direct TV. I do not want to do so if it requires an unnecessary risk for an individual to install. My issue now is that I am signed up for a triple play package with Verizon that I would like to terminate and do so with a letter from Direct TV indicating they are unable to find a place to proper install. My bone of contention is that simialr households, with a placement of the dish where I would need it installed, had Direct TV installed by the authorized dealer. As such, it was a fair assumption that I too could have it installed. To the extent that it was a mistake for Direct TV or its sub contract to install, fine. They shoudl admit as much so that I can get out of my Verizon agreement. Bottom line for me, while this appears to be an information sharing site that I have appreciated, is that folks who beleive they can have the Dish on their roof should take signficant precautions on considering Direct TV because of an unclear policy and practice. I truly appreciate everyone's comments on this site, it is not an easy issue to resolve.
     
  8. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I still don't get why you haven't tried a local dealer.
     
  9. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    ^ Because he's signed up for a bundled agreement with Verizon that includes DirecTV, right, Duke? (I didn't get that until his last posting.)

    Even if you go with a private contractor to do this job, I think you'll need a letter like this, getting you out of DirecTV's system.

    Your request seems reasonable to me but I'm not Verizon or DirecTV.
     
  10. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    I've got to ask another question.

    Duke, when the installer and his manager were out, did they approach you about alternate locations for the dish? Is there one that might not be perfect but would be acceptable to you?
     
  11. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

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    Don't move to Texas. 99% of the dishes here are on 2 story roofs.
     
  12. rahlquist

    rahlquist Hall Of Fame

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    Jul 24, 2007
    One other thing a lot of people may not understand as well relates to Contractor vs Employee and law and liability. My company deals with this a lot even though its a different industry. Here is what it boils down to, D* cant tell them they must do a risky install. They cant dictate any install completely. They can explain what must be done to complete an install in a technical sense, but cant dictate how its done completely. If they did then they would risk jumping from a contractor relationship to employee. The infrastructure, pay, etc could become irrelevant. Then D* would be in a 100% liability position for anything going wrong which is something their legal team has surely made them aware of.
     
  13. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Correct but too gentle!

    The free...FREE installation offers nothing unless you live in the 20 x 20 cabin shown in the installation drawing.

    Still Directv says the installation will be free...FREE!

    But contractors charge their costs + a profit. Most will not work for Directv anymore.

    So you get FREE work from newbies who need supervision and training.

    There is someone who capable of doing this installation nearby. They do not work for Directv or their HSP pimps.

    Joe
     
  14. DukePA

    DukePA Cool Member

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    First to answer a previous question, I have not gone with another installer because as others indicated my deal with Direct TV was for their free installation and service deal. Either it is safe to install and service on the roof or it is not. If Direct TV's sub, who is the only authorized sub in the area, says it is not safe than in my mind that is the same as Direct TV saying no. I am not going to fight it.

    To the question above, there was not a lot of review of other options and not sure if there were any others. One option mentioned, but not tested for line of sight, was to have the dish in the front of home attached to the front of the roof edge and directed back towards the house. However, our townhouse community does not allow the dish in the front of the house. It would also be difficult because I am not sure how they would get the lines from the dish to point of entry for where the cable lines enter the house as it is in the back of the house (My house is situated between two others so you could not go around the house with the cables) And again, I know I am repeating myself, but others in my community have their dish on the back of the roof. I think it is because it is the best place for line of sight and makes it the easiest point of entry to connect the Dish cables into the pre-wired cable lines.

    Right now, my goal is to get something that will allow me to end my package deal with verizon. I am disappointed because I was ready to free myself from Cable and enjoy Direct TV.
     
  15. Lee L

    Lee L Hall Of Fame

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    I had a similar situation. This is a single family 2 story home, but with 9 foot ceilings and a crawlspace, you have to have a 28 foot ladder to have enough sticking up for saftey regs. Also, our roof is a 16/12 pitch (thats right, steeper than 45 degrees) due to a large bonus room in the attic area. In fact, I can easily stand up in teh attic area above the bonus room, even though the roof starts in the normal place a 2 story house roof would.

    They even put 2 hard point harness attachments on every house in out neighborhood so the roofers could use harnesses (and watching those guys on houses across the street swing from their safety lines all day was pretty crazy). They are flashed in and have black covers that make them more or less invisible.

    Needless to say, when the satellite installer got here he about crapped himself and said no way. Luckily, we do have a laundry room area off the kitchen that sticks out about 8 feet and is only a shed roof and 1 stoy high, so he offered to put the dish there. At first I was not too keen on this as the roof is just outside our bathroom window, but after they more or less told me this was all they could do and I checked and realized we pretty much had to have the blids covering the window at all times anyway, I gave in. Now, just about every house out here now has their dish in the same spot, except for the few with no LOS there. A could are on the roof and a couple on the side by the electric meter.

    The guy did have to run about 50 feet of extra cable (4 lines) to install in his preferred spot since the satellite prewire was near the electric meter and at first he was trying to make me pay more, but wehn I reminded him that he was causing the wire run and the entire rest of my house was 100% wired with brand new RG6Q and he had to do nothing else, he decided to go ahead for free.

    At any rate, it would be nice if they had at least one guy in each area that could do taller installs (even if it cost 50 bucks more or something) or some better mangement of the whole process, but I guess they do have to set everything for the least common denominator install.
     
  16. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    You are seeing both sides.

    Installers are paid a piece rate and nothing extra for being a hero on a steep roof. So they tend to bypass the time killers. The other side of this is that after the high roof installation is complete YOU will have to live with it; snow cover and wind damage and all. Service calls are even more underfunded .

    The ground mount will allow ez service. Don't hit it with a mower or dig up the lines and you will be fine. The standard fee for a pole in concrete is $75.00 up and at some point the total cable length to the receiver causes service issues. Your installer ate some of that cost to move on to another easier project.

    Joe
     
  17. DukePA

    DukePA Cool Member

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    Well, I have an official end to the story -- I spoke with Direct TV once more to assure their stance was that I was precluded from receiving Direct TV. The CSR and supervisor indicated that the installer said installation was not safe on the roof for the tech. When I pointed out that there was direct TV installations done on my neighborhoods with the exact same roof, they had no response -- Which did not surprize me. Although, they did advise me that if I asked my neighbor which tech did their installation and maybe i could request that tech to do the job????(my ongoing question in this whole story is it Direct TV, as the owner of the service and distributer of the equipment postion it is safe to place on my roof or not???)

    What is unfortunate in this situation, as some of indicated, is that Direct TV does not have a clear policy about what is safe installation for their dishes. While I know that a blanket rule cannot be made, it appears to me that there is wide varation in when a dish is placed on a roof. For indviiduals like me who see them on roofs siimlar to mine and assume the same can be done (especially since Direct TV marketing advertisment indicates it is avilable 100% when comparing it to Cable) this is unfortunate assumption when you enter into an agreement that cannot be fufilled. It is even worse for those who have the dish on the roof already and then need service/replacement and have a tech not provide service because of safety concerns. I do appreciate those who recommended going with an outside installer, but that is not what I signed up for nor is it a practice I would normally engage in terms of not using a vendor's authorized service company.

    All is not lost, Verizon was very good about terminating my bundled package (by the way, when I asked Direct TV to assist, all they would do is give me the phone number, they did not want to rely the reason why I could not get service). I appreciate everyone's input and thoughts!
     
  18. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Why? Authorized vendors can often times be better installers and easier to get issues resolved.
     
  19. DukePA

    DukePA Cool Member

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    Sorry, I was not clear. What I meant was that I only go with a Vendor's authorized service dealer. This is not to say that those who are not authorized are not competent, but if you run into issues you have more recourse when dealing with a vendors authorized dealer/service company.
     
  20. raoul5788

    raoul5788 Guest

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    I'm sure there are many authorized installers in your area, but perhaps only one that is used for contract install work. IOW, you may have to pay for the install rather than get it done for free. It will be covered by Directv for all intents and purposes. Did you try asking if they will reimburse you at least partly if you have another company do the install?
     

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