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Router question

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by B Newt, Mar 30, 2013.

  1. B Newt

    B Newt Icon

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    Aug 12, 2007
    Do you power down your router when you power down your computer? Or do you run your router 24/7? I'm wondering if I set to record a vod from my iphone while the router is off, will it start recording the vod next time I turn on my router?
     
  2. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    I never power down my router. It's been months since it's been rebooted. I also never power down my PC and there are too many other devices needing internet access. . . weather station, power reporting, iphones, ipads, telephones, dvrs.

    Your VOD should start downloading when it sees the internet unless it gives up.
     
  3. Athenian

    Athenian Legend

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    In the 15+ years that I've been running routers at home, it's never occurred to me to power one down. Are you thinking of powering down the modem too?

    Nowadays, with machines in different rooms and devices like television and blu-ray players getting content from the Internet, how would you ever know when to turn it on/off?
     
  4. B Newt

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    I just worry about someone might break my password if its always on. I wish there was a way to type " %^(87hjJH @ " these characters with my dtv receiver when I set it to send the password to the router. Numbers and letters are just not enough for a high security password.
     
  5. B Newt

    B Newt Icon

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    Aug 12, 2007
    The only thing I use my router for is my dtv, iphone and laptop. My main computer is directly plugged into the cablemodem. So when I am in bed or out of the house I really dont need the router running up the power bill.
     
  6. Athenian

    Athenian Legend

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    Nov 16, 2005
    I'm not sure familiar with that kind of operation. Why does your TV receiver need a password for the router?
     
  7. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

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    First, routers don't use much power. Second, it's really dangerous to connect your computer directly to the modem. I don't trust the firewall in any computer that much. Hiding your computer behind the router's firewall and NAT is much safer from internet attacks.
     
  8. Athenian

    Athenian Legend

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    Exactly. And I'm still mystified by the need to use a password.
     
  9. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

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    Got me. For his other devices, it could be a Wifi password. But for the receiver?
     
  10. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    Who's out to get you. hackers are NOT interested in breaking in to your system, too little to gain, if any. hackers rather set up a code via the internet that affects millions of users, this way the MIGHT be able to get something. Otherwise they are interested in big corporations.
     
  11. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

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    Bandwidth is cheap. Hackers will scan any IP addresses they can find, looking for any holes they can exploit. That's how botnets are created. Don't depend on security through obscurity, and don't put a device (like a PC) that can be exploited directly on the public internet. Always use a router with a hardware firewall and hide the real machines behind NAT. Be VERY careful about any port-forwarding you set up on that router.
     
  12. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    Not the case. see if you can find anyone that was severely affected by someone hacking in to a residential network. other than a neighbor leeching to the internet there is not much reason to over secure a network
     
  13. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

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    Had it happen to me, when I was running a personal server directly on a public IP address. And I didn't say they hacked the "network". They hack the computers that are directly exposed.

    http://arstechnica.com/security/201...epic-botnet-to-scan-billions-of-ip-addresses/
     
  14. peds48

    peds48 Genius.

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    Exactly my point. if a hackers wants to get through, there is no security key characters that will stop them.
     
  15. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

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    Umm, no. You stated they weren't interested. And the article was about penetrating unprotected or open ports. Not about breaking passcodes. So are you still saying that it's not worth protecting system with a good router and NAT? Because that sure seemed to be what you were saying.
     
  16. wingrider01

    wingrider01 Hall Of Fame

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    erk - not sure where you came up with this urban legend but "hackers" can make a mint off you by getting into your system and installed a key logger or another similar Trojan, unless you only use your computer for internet access to read face book and the like - if you use your machine for checkbooks, accessing your credit card information, your banking, life insurance, bill paying they can get everything they need to steal your identity and run up thousands of dollars of bills, ruin your credit rating, and destroy your life. Not all hackers are members of that a**h**t organization that like to attack high profile organizations just show they can show they have bigger ones then all of mankind.

    You would be surprised how many ID thefts start with the installation of a simple decades piece of code that does key logging and forwarding.
     
  17. wingrider01

    wingrider01 Hall Of Fame

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    yes, my inlaws - they had a key logger added to their system, credit card access, bank records access, life insurance access, and numerous other items logged, stolen and used to run their 760 credit record, continuous calls from collection agencies, and legal authorities, not sure what urban fantasy world you are living in but it definitely has no idea about security of personal information and what can be obtained from your personal computer.

    I will stay with my ASA5510, Cisco Ironport and trend micro a/v appliance and packet sniffer that I have installed at home and in the process of picking up used gear for my inlaws installation.
     
  18. Mr. Tact

    Mr. Tact Cool Member

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    Uh, while keyloggers are certainly a threat to home computer users, especially to computer novices, turning off the router overnight (that is what we are talking about, right) isn't going to help in that situation.
     
  19. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

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    Well, it was actually about the fact that the OP connects his computer directly to his modem, without a router in between. Which is certainly going to make much easier for a keylogger (or other malware) to get installed on his system.
     
  20. carlsbad_bolt_fan

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    But the hacker didn't break through your in-laws network and attack their computer. They most likely picked up that key logger from a link to an infected website.
     

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