Running Cable to Building

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by terpencar, Aug 16, 2019.

  1. terpencar

    terpencar New Member

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    Can I run E83032A F660BVV CATV 18AWG wire through the air to an office from the house and will it work with the wired Genie satellite boxes?
     
  2. compnurd

    compnurd Hall Of Fame

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    How far
     
  3. terpencar

    terpencar New Member

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    Distance between building and house is about 10ft.. I ran a CAT6 cable last week in an overhead PVC pipe.. Thinking I just run this with it.
     
  4. compnurd

    compnurd Hall Of Fame

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    If not exposed i see no issue. If exposed direct burial might be better
     
  5. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    Cable companies run RG6 through the air all over. I have RG6 from a pole behind my house running about 80' to my house and down the wall where it enters. It has been there 20+ years completely exposed and never had a problem.

    Someday an ice storm will take down a branch big enough snap that line (and probably the DSL and power lines as well) but knock on wood so far so good!
     
  6. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Not all RG6 is created equal. The cable company would choose the right cable for an aerial drop.
     
  7. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    True, I don't know what might be special about this. I never looked at it to see if I can see any writing on it (probably not after so many years) but it isn't any thicker than regular cable at least. I think it is actually RG59 though I'd have to double check to be sure.

    I assume the insulation is formulated with exposure to the elements in mind, but that's not different than what you need for the coax running from the dish on your roof. That coax probably has it worse, in fact, since it gets a lot hotter laying directly on shingles than it would suspended in air.
     
  8. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Heat is one element (call it "temperature" to include cold). Water is another element. Some plastics don't fare well under UV light (keep them out of the sun).

    For an aerial cable I'd look at tensile strength. Most cable of any type can hold up to short spans of "free air". The tensile strength will define how "short" the spans need to be. One can face that issue indoors ... build a cable pathway in an attic, a crawl space or above a suspended ceiling with cables suspended between support hooks. Do you place a support every two feet? Every five feet? Every ten feet? Every twenty? The further apart the supports the more weight the cable itself has to support. The weight of the cable is important in unsupported vertical runs. Not a problem in most homes where one is dealing with a 10 or 20 ft span, but more important in cable chases that could be 100 ft or more between supports.

    Add in the other elements of heat and water - plus wind with an outdoor span (the stress on the cable is increased when the wind is pushing on the cable). A coax doesn't have a huge wind load, but there are still some effects. The science isn't new and based on your experience it seems your cable company installed the right cable 20+ years ago. The old cable drop to my house was RG11 and had a second wire for physical support. The aerial telephone wires to my house were also higher tensile strength.

    For the use discussed in this thread: As long as the coax is rated for outdoor use or is otherwise protected (inside conduit) it should work. If it is outdoor rated and running next to the conduit used for cat-6 I'd probably tie it off in a few places to lessen the stress. (But don't go crazy with tightening zip ties ... one does not want to damage the cables by creating a place where the tie will cut the cable.)
     
  9. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

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    At a length of 10 feet you can use any coax for clothesline and it will hold up.

    I used to occasionally use Aerial RG-11 cable when stringing master antenna system distribution wiring between tall buildings. It had a so-called "messenger wire" molded to it to take the strain. That support wire was cut and twisted around hooks, like the roof hooks you'd use when solidifying a tall antenna mast with guy wires.

    For well over a decade, a lot of people have come to misuse the term messenger wire to describe the 17 gauge, copper clad steel ground wire that meets the NEC requirements for grounding a mast as messenger wire. In fact, so many people have misused the designation that way that you can probably find more web pages that use it incorrectly than use it correctly. But for ten feet, I'd trust it for extra support.

    Aerial messenger wire is not copper clad steel, nor is it pure copper. I just found one Belden product that said their Aerial messenger wire was galvanized steel, which makes sense, and strangely, I think that long ago I had read of Arial messenger wire that was aluminum, which seemed odd to me because aluminum is not that strong, so even that old product listing may have been in error.

    Basically any coax will do outdoors as long as it is not white (famous last words, because I did once find a maybe 20 year old black downlead on a Burger King rotting away) because white pigment is often titanium oxide (?) and reacts unfavorably to sunlight. I've done a few hundred commercial antenna installations over the last three decades and never have checked to see if any of the coaxes were certified by their manufacturer for outdoor use.

    FWIW, about 20 years ago, I did get called out on a freezing but not sub zero day to install a residential dish system on a house that was pre-wired with the cheapest coax I have ever seen. I was unable to put coax connectors on the wire because no matter how gingerly I pushed the connector onto the 1-4"/1-4" stripped coax end, the outer jacket would split and shed like a snake's skin. If I gave a damn, I would have gotten out my heat gun and softened it up, but the job wasn't going well as it was so I just bailed out.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2019
  10. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Sure, it would work as a clothesline.

    I've seen some fairly crappy installations that somehow worked. "There, I fixed it" isn't the end of the spectrum where I work. :)
     
  11. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

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    My aerial cable coax has a messenger wire, I'm sure that does help its strength for the relatively long span.
     

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