1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Satellite internet

Discussion in 'General Satellite Discussion' started by Shawnn, Dec 16, 2008.

  1. Shawnn

    Shawnn AllStar

    53
    0
    Sep 23, 2007
    I have customer that wants satellite internet at his cabin. I have looked at direct way with a download speed (Up To) 2.0 Mbps, Upload speed (Up To) 128 Kbps. and it’s not fast enough for him. I was wondering if there are any other options or providers with higher speed.

    Thanks
     
  2. tcusta00

    tcusta00 Active Member

    7,911
    1
    Dec 31, 2007
    I believe Hughesnet (formerly DirecWay) is the only satellite internet provider around. Even if you could find another, I doubt you'll be able to find one with very high bandwidth.

    Your other option if traditional terrestrial options aren't available in his area is a wireless carrier's internet, but there again you won't find the bandwidth to be higher than 2mbps down.

    http://www.wireless.att.com/cell-phone-service/cell-phones/pc-cards.jsp
     
  3. Shawnn

    Shawnn AllStar

    53
    0
    Sep 23, 2007
    Thanks for the information, just wanted to make sure I was not missing another provider. How do you find the speed of your Satellite internet?
     
  4. tcusta00

    tcusta00 Active Member

    7,911
    1
    Dec 31, 2007
    You mean once you have satellite internet? You could go to a bandwidth testing website like www.speedtest.net.
     
  5. dpfaunts

    dpfaunts Godfather

    253
    0
    Oct 17, 2006
    FYI, the latency with satellite internet access can cause issues. VPN will react slower than dial-up and voip probably won't work
     
  6. RobertE

    RobertE New Member

    8,024
    0
    Jun 9, 2006
    Wildblue offers up to 1.5Mbps down. Not sure if they serve Canada or not.
    HughesNet offers up to 5.0Mbps down. I think they also serve Canada. However that 5 down will set you back $349.99 (not a typo) PER MONTH.
     
  7. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

    8,969
    1
    Nov 13, 2007
    Satellite Internet is neither fast nor cheap, and it's a high-latency connection, so most VPN doesn't work, and neither does on-line gaming, VOIP, or anything else that's time-sensitive.

    It's faster than dial-up, but that's about the only advantage. It is for folks who don't have any other options, but it'll never compete with wired (or WiFi) connections.
     
  8. Shawnn

    Shawnn AllStar

    53
    0
    Sep 23, 2007
    No, how do you find the speed as in using it. Is it fast for basic browsing and Email.
     
  9. jclewter79

    jclewter79 Hall Of Fame

    1,833
    0
    Jan 8, 2008
    I looked in to satellite internet for my home but, for the speed and the 60 bucks a month, I decided to go with verizion cellular broadband. Of course, I only use my laptop and have not looked into running a home network with it. If it could be done my guess is that cut my speed down alot.
     
  10. tcusta00

    tcusta00 Active Member

    7,911
    1
    Dec 31, 2007
    Sorry, I don't use it.
     
  11. kaszeta

    kaszeta AllStar

    72
    0
    Apr 8, 2008
    Satellite internet user weighing in here.

    I have Wildblue, since I live in "the sticks" in New Hampshire, and satellite and modem are the only options here unless I want to spend the $$$ for a T1.

    The key thing is that the metric here is "better than dialup". I find my satellite connection is decent for email and basic browsing, although the latency issue is sometimes an issue.

    Things that don't work:
    (a) VPNs and VOIP are painfully slow due to the latency
    (b) Online gaming is mostly not doable
    (c) Uplink bandwidth is low, making uploading a pain.
    (d) Bandwidth limits (aka Fair Access Policy) make it difficult to do a lot of high-bandwidth stuff. I'm usually pretty close to triggering the bandwidth limits on my wildblue account, and I'm not exactly a heavy web user. I'll download basic software upgrades, the occasional PS3 update, and some light music downloading, and that's about it.

    It *is* waaaaaaay better than dialup (I do usually get 1 mbps downlink, about the same uplink rate as my modem, but with the latency issues). I'm not a fan, but unless Comcast or Fairpoint are willing to pull the sticks out of their %%$#$s, it's what I'm stuck with.
     
  12. Shawnn

    Shawnn AllStar

    53
    0
    Sep 23, 2007
    Thanks for the info
     
  13. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

    4,847
    8
    Aug 4, 2006
    I'd like to resurrect this thread from the dead as I am now considering Hughesnet or some satellite ISP. My only other option is mobile broadband from AT&T--I can see their tower from my house, but they don't have 3G in this area and it may be a long time until they get it on all their towers around here.

    Given that my options are the older-technology AT&T broadband (with a 5 gig/month cap) or Hughesnet, what do you guys think? I'm only concerned with general web surfing and email, not downloading music or game play, although we may stay connected for a few hours per day.
     
  14. fineware

    fineware AllStar

    98
    0
    Jun 12, 2007
    I have HughesNet, and I'll second everything added here, with some additions:

    1. Bandwidth limitations are a pain to track, especially when your kid comes home from college expecting she can YouTube all day.

    2. The speeds advertised are generally correct for the period between 2 and 7am on HughesNet (which is also the FAP-free period). Hughes has loaded almost every transponder to the limit and your speed degrades with each account using it. I have a plan that tops out at approx. 192MB, but goes to about 20Mb during peak hours, such as 8pm - extremely annoying.

    The next best alternative is using G3 WiFi via your wireless, if coverage is available. I'm really in the sticks (no cell, no cable, no FiOS, and poor phone lines) so I'm stuck. Others might have alternatives.
     
  15. paulman182

    paulman182 Hall Of Fame

    4,847
    8
    Aug 4, 2006
    Thanks for the info. 20Mb would not annoy me when compared with 28.8kb that I get on dial-up.

    As I said, AT&T 3G is not available here yet, it is "Edge" I think--does anyone know what kind of speed you get from that?
     
  16. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

    6,262
    133
    Jun 6, 2009
    Look at Starband. They got a bad rap for a while, but they've been stable for me. They're in the process of moving most subscribers to a new satellite to address traffic and speed concerns. BW cap is a rolling 7 day window of 1Gb, so if you go over, you can clear it without waiting a whole month. BW is not metered between 12M and 6AM is you have any big files to download or programs to update.

    Prices aren't great, but not as bad as some.

    Plus, if it won't get me slapped around too much on this board, I could use the referral bonus.
     
  17. Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

    3,682
    0
    Dec 8, 2006
    I would also look into Wildblue. I recently got certified and from what I can see they do run a tight ship technically.
     
  18. txtommy

    txtommy Icon

    805
    0
    Dec 30, 2006
    +1

    As long as you just do email and basic surfing there should be sufficient BW and speed to keep you happy. With two teenagers on our home network who insist on downloading videos, photos and music, I am in a constant battle to avoid the FAP and ultra slow download rates. They do manage to go over about once a week which results in a 24 painfully slow penalty from Hughesnet.

    But it is better than dial-up which is our only other option.
     
  19. kfcrosby

    kfcrosby Godfather

    384
    1
    Dec 17, 2006
    Memphis, TN
    I recently got introduced to Skycasters. Primarily targeted to commercial applications, but they do have VoIP, VPN and Fax applications working with their service.

    Expensive, but if it is your only option....


    Kevin
     
  20. kaszeta

    kaszeta AllStar

    72
    0
    Apr 8, 2008
    Technically the Wildblue guys seemed good, but boy, they had a lot of hardware problems in the years I had them. Several TRIA replacements, and coming to accept that the TRIAS doen't really work well in cold weather or in the rain (I'm not talking rain fade, the TRIA getting wet would cause problems, so I ended up building a little roof extension over my dish)

    A few weeks ago I finally (for several $K) managed to get Comcast to pull cable to my property, and ditching Wildblue was a happy, happy moment.
     

Share This Page