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Searching for Sat Service Call - What to look for

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by tonyoci, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. tonyoci

    tonyoci Legend

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    Oct 14, 2006
    I've had an ongoing problem with picture quality and last time I called I was routed to call management.

    The guy that was sent did everything I can imagine, moved the dish (too the roof from the side), recabled everything, changed multiswitches etc.

    Of course after he left things got considerably worse.

    So basically on 3 HD receivers (in the same room), I get frequent, though not always, searching for satellite errors, and also many times I get unwatchable pictures on the HD channels due to extreme pixelization and freezing. This happens on live TV and recorded shows, some boxes more than others.

    Since the problem only occur intermittently, what should I ask the tech to do ???
     
  2. cmtar

    cmtar Icon

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    Nov 16, 2005
    Bad LNB maybe? Connectors? Trees?
     
  3. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    Jackson
    What are your signal strengths?
     
  4. Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

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    Try extension cord from another room, put 1 IRD and the TV on that extension cord. You might be dealing with bad power, reverse polarity, or ground on neutral.
     
  5. tonyoci

    tonyoci Legend

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    Oct 14, 2006
    Thanks Mertzen but I didn't understand a word you wrote :) All receivers are in the same room if that's relevant.

    Signal strengths are generally good, above 80, even when a bad picture is in progress.

    Thanks.
     
  6. Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

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    Sorry let me recap.

    Unplug the TV and one of the affected IRDs [ boxes ]
    Run an extension cord from another room of the house into the room where everything is setup.
    Plug both the TV and the affected IRD into this extension cord.
    Check to see if the problem persists.


    More then once [ just last week as a matter of fact ] I had random pixelation and signal loss due to bad power in the building.

    Co location a lot of equipment in one are [ as you seem to have ] can also cause trouble. Seen HT, PS3, XB360, LCD TV, D* box and much more plugged into one outlet of a 60 year old building. Problem ensured.
     
  7. tonyoci

    tonyoci Legend

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    Oct 14, 2006
    Thanks, this is however a new problem, I've run this setup for a good while without any issues. The original call was for the odd missed program and bad picture and each service call since has made it worse :)
     
  8. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I have four HRs, one optical switcher, one game adapter, one workstation switch, one BD player, one plasma TV, one sub woofer, and one eSATA, two lamps all on the same 20 amp circuit protected by a GFI and have absolutely no problems. I do live in a 60 year old house, but I put this circuit in myself and made sure I stayed around a total of 16 amps at any given time. As long as you are aware of the 80% rule when considering the load on a circuit, it should not be a problem.

    Put all that stuff on a 15 amp circuit and you've got problems.

    For those of you who don't understand the "80% rule", it was taught to me when I was serving my electrical apprenticeship so many years ago. What it means is that as long as you stay under 80% of the circuit breaker's rating, you should never have a problem. So, on a 20 amp circuit, 16 amps is the max, on a 15 amp circuit, 12 is the max, these figures are based on the 80% rule. You "can" put a tad over 20 amps on a 20 amp breaker and it will work for a while, but will eventually trip. This is true of all breakers. Also the insulation on the wires will begin to break down and that could cause a fire. Use the 80% rule and you'll never have those problems.

    Regarding the home Mertzen references, if it is 60 years old and has had no wiring or breaker upgrades, yeah, you'll have problems. Most of the older homes have 15 amp circuits for receptacles and lighting. And most of them are probably close to using 15 amps on those circuits. That's how houses get burned down. The wires get old, the insulation breaks down, mice gnaw at the insulation, people don't trip their breakers once a year and after a while (quite a while), some breakers don't trip internally. I've seen all of the above things happen.

    Just some thoughts.

    Rich
     
  9. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Just because the installers come out and do a lot of work and install a lot of goodies, doesn't mean it is done correctly. You've got to keep pounding on D* to get it right. Took me over two years to get my "system" up to what I thought was correct, then took two more service calls recently to really get it up to the proper standard and I'm still not satisfied. Most of the installers we get in central NJ are poorly trained and can't even align a dish correctly.

    Doesn't sound like your HRs are the problem, sounds like a "system" problem. "System" being the dish to the HR.

    Do you belong to the Protection Plan? After 3 trouble calls, if they can't solve the problems, they refer you to the Case Management Group (CMG) who will stay with you until your problems are solved. The PP is well worth the few bucks a month it costs.

    Rich
     
  10. johnp37

    johnp37 Icon

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    I think this would be a good time for all members to take a good look at their system load protection. As rich584 suggested a minimum of 20 amps on their system circuit. For peace of mind I personally have gone one better to 30 amps which takes care of: 1) 46" LCD TV, 1)7.1 stereo,1)CD player,1)HR21+AM21 tuner,1)blu ray player,1)powered subwoofer, all plugged into a APC H-15 Power Conditioner. Also my basement sump pump and an outlet in our home office. A 30 amp breaker may be kind of overkill for what is not a huge load but like I said, peace of mind.
     
  11. drpjr

    drpjr Icon

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    Sakatomatoes...
    QUOTE/ I Think this would be a good time for all members to take a good look at their system load protection. As rich584 suggested a minimum of 20 amps on their system circuit. For peace of mind I personally have gone one better to 30 amps which takes care of: 1) 46" LCD TV, 1)7.1 stereo,1)CD player,1)HR21+AM21 tuner,1)blu ray player,1)powered subwoofer, all plugged into a APC H-15 Power Conditioner. Also my basement sump pump and an outlet in our home office. A 30 amp breaker may be kind of overkill for what is not a huge load but like I said, peace of mind. /QUOTE If I understand this correctly you replaced the 15/20 amp circuit breaker in your electrcal panel with a 30 amp breaker. This is a no no unless you also change the wire size (30 amp #10 wire) and the receptacle. However I don't beleive they make a 30amp residential receptacle. #10 wire is too big to fit into the back or wrap around the screws on a regular duplex receptacle. Let me expand a little on wire size. 15 amp circuits require #14 wire, 20 amp circuits require #12 wire and 30 amp circuits require #10 wire. All three are required to be derated 20% by code. You CANNOT put a bigger breaker on smaller wire. That is a serious fire hazard and against the national electrical code.
     
  12. drpjr

    drpjr Icon

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    Nov 23, 2007
    Sakatomatoes...
    My apologies for the form of post #11. I was trying to Quote post #10 and respond to it. I am new to posting and don't have the methods down yet. Any help or direction would be appreciated. Thanks Don
     
  13. RACJ2

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    You need to add [/QUOTE] to the end of the content you are quoting. The word QUOTE should be capitalized at the beginning and end of the quote. You can click on the edit box of your post to fix it.
     
  14. johnp37

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    Central NJ
     
  15. drpjr

    drpjr Icon

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    Sakatomatoes...
    Thanks RACJ2 for the info. I tried to edit but no luck. I am missing the obvious so I will investigate further on this site for posting methods. Don't want to sidetrack this thread.
     
  16. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Was wondering how you did that. It can be done with a 30 amp breaker, but the physical wiring must be #10 wire to accommodate the 30 amp breaker. Then you'd need 30 amp receptacles too. Pretty big and cumbersome. Two 20 amp circuits would work better. And with a 20 amp breaker you must use #12 wire. With a 15 amp breaker #14 wire is used. If you were to use #15 wire on a 20 amp breaker and load the breaker up to almost 20 amps, the #15 wire would overheat, the insulation would degrade, the neutral and hot wires would come together, the breaker probably wouldn't trip and your house would be on fire.

    I'm always available for electrical advice, John.

    Rich
     
  17. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Go to "quote" and look at this post. The only difference between the two "quotes" in the brackets is the slash. Each time you want to isolate dialog, use this method and you will have no problems.

    Rich
     

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