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Seeking advice: Is damage claim process with DirecTV worth the trouble?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by jimconnor, May 30, 2012.

  1. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    Only up to the amount of the mortgage, however. If you have a $250,000 house with a $100,000 mortgage, and only get HOI enough to cover the lender's requirement, you'd be SOL if your house burned down.
     
  2. bobcamp1

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    Level 4 ESD test (highest voltage needed for consumer electronics) is 15kV air / 8 kV contact. Hardly any current to kill you, but plenty of power to kill the MOSFETs in your electronics.

    Lightning mitigation is complicated. For instance, the cable that carries the current is typically 7/16" in diameter and is 32 or so copper wires braided together. I highly doubt the installer would have connected the dish to ground using that kind of cable.
     
  3. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Your whole house is a grounded system, so your going to tell me that if you home electric meter got struck , you home would be fine?

    No way, everything you had plugged in would be fried, every lightbulb would explode, and more then likly your house would be on fire.

    Thats a fully grounded system that requires an electrical inspection.

    The tiny piece of 10 gauge wire (if thats what they even use) will never stop lightning directly or even a nearby hit as much as some of you want to believe.
    Unplug your equipment.
     
  4. bobcamp1

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    That's totally wrong. If your neighbor gets hit, your ground is temporarily no longer ground but is several thousand volts instead. Since there is positive and negative lightning, the current can flow from ground into the hot and neutral terminals in your outlets (i.e. current is flowing the wrong way). So now your box is exposed to high reverse voltage. Ironically, this type of damage doesn't happen if you're not grounded.

    There is a completely separate set of equipment needed for surge protection, and it assumes that the surge can be coming from ground.

    Being grounded significantly increases the risk of damage due to a lightning strike (excluding an official lightning mediation system). But there is a far greater chance of poor wiring or equipment malfunctions causing injury and deaths. So everything gets grounded.
     
  5. wallfishman

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    In my experience, the fact that its not grounded properly, Directv will pay for the damage. They will push it off to the installation company and they can turn it into their insurance. I was a tech for comcast for a long time and my brother is an istallation supervisor that deals with damage everyday. They have bought hundreds of tvs and computers for things not being grounded. We all know it probably would not have stopped it but the fact is you dont know, you just know it wasnt grounded to NEC code and they are on the hook. Take pictures of everything now before they come out.
    Thats Comcast, as far as Directv I know a company i contracted before had to pay for something like this. I think you have a good chance of getting it paid for. Just follow the damage claim process out. when they come out let them knows the damage followed through their ungrounded cable. And mention NEC Code requires grounding.
     
  6. prospect60

    prospect60 Legend

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    Well technically that's what DirecTV and/or the Installers insurance is for. If they violated state code in not grounding the dish properly they they become the liable party.

    In real life any claim that gets paid or even made will increase the insurance owners possibility of an increase.

    Like others have mentioned a properly grounded dish may not necessarily have prevented a lightning strike, but it certainly would have decreased the chances of getting hit to begin.
     
  7. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Properly grounded would have been with a 9/16 copper braided wire.


    So no I don't think it would have made one bit of difference.

    Do some reseach people, grounding is not to protect against lightning strikes at all.
    Its to protect your equipment from static electricity.

    What do you think happends to a residential powerline or transformer when its hit by lightning? Nothing? Yea don't bet your money on that!:lol:
     
  8. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    A lightning strike produces in excess of 150,000 amps.

    you think a rated 20-30 amp wire will save your systems?
     
  9. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    It doesn't take an Electrical Engineer. It takes some small research and knowing how to read.

    Fact is a 20-30 Amp wire will not support 150,000 amps.!
     
  10. tigerwillow1

    tigerwillow1 Legend

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    I doubt that anybody is suggesting that a ground wire will protect against a direct hit. The issue is whether or not bleeding the static charge from the dish reduces the risk of attracting a direct strike. I've found opinions arguing both ways.
     
  11. bobcamp1

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    I have an M.S. in EE. You are correct. :)

    Actually, that wire should instantly vaporize or at least melt if it did attempt to carry most of that energy. And then where would the rest of the energy of that strike go?

    You can use #26 AWG wire as long as it is also 1.5" wide. But most building codes don't recognize that, so you have to use 1/2" braided copper wire, give or take 1/16".
     
  12. bobcamp1

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    Grounding the dish slightly INCREASES the chance of a direct strike. The presence of a relatively microscopic static charge has absolutely nothing to do with attracting lightning.

    Besides, if the dish is installed correctly minus the ground wire, there is probably no static charge on it. The dish is still grounded because it's in contact with the LNA, and the LNA is grounded via the shielding in the cables. That shielding is then hopefully tied to house ground within the receiver.

    But hey, if the OP can get someone to pay for it, more power to him (sorry about the pun).
     
  13. bigglebowski

    bigglebowski Legend

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    Uh oh, its like you are being blasphemous by what you speak of. Also btw, I DO NOT disagree with what you say, im just pointing out that most people just dont fully "get" what grounding is about.

    Also LNA, wow had not heard that in a while. I seem to remember the C-Band ones were huge. Then again the cable was too, as well as the separate block downconverters the "newer" equipment needed. Cant remember what the cable type was though, remember them using N connectors.
     
  14. HobbyTalk

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    Early BUDs had separate DCs. The signal coming out of the LNA was 950Mhz to 1450Mhz so RG-11 was used to connect the LNA to the DC.
     
  15. bigglebowski

    bigglebowski Legend

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    You made me look it up. The coax was rg-213 WAY thicker than rg-11 because it was not block converting to 950-1450Mhz hence the need for thicker cable.
     
  16. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Thank you. Glad you could explain it better.

    :lol:

    I think grounding is important for many factors with equipment.
    But Lightning, nope it doesn't take Direct or indirect strikes to fry equipment. Best defence unplug your electric and cables and stop being lazy and expecting someone else to pay for it all the time.

    If your dish is hit you might want to call the fire department!
     
  17. Jon J

    Jon J Grouch Extrordinaire

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    Especially if you got a "Super Ice" from Satellite Shouty. ;)
     
  18. bobcamp1

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    That's because I meant to type LNB. not LNA. :D That's just my work life creeping into this forum.

    My point was that there's metal to metal contact so that the dish and its LNB are grounded even without the ground wire, just not in an optimal way. The ground wire running from the dish to ground is just a dedicated connection to ground, and is the optimal way to ground a dish. I can tell you that it's not needed for proper functioning of the equipment, nor does it have any measurable impact on lightning or surge protection.

    You ground the dish because you don't want an installer standing on the roof or on a 20' ladder getting an unexpected zap when he touches the dish. Surprises in those situations are bad.
     
  19. studechip

    studechip Godfather

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    You must mean Gary Cubeta!
     
  20. Jon J

    Jon J Grouch Extrordinaire

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    I don't remember his name just that he was hawking equipment 24/7. ;)
     

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