Sept. 20-26 Big Premiere Week

Discussion in 'TV Show Talk' started by mreposter, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. mreposter

    mreposter Hall Of Fame

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    At least three of those shows had plenty of time to prove themselves and generate good ratings. (Jericho, Sarah Connor, Studio 60) Sadly for fans, they couldn't generate a large enough audience to succeed.

    I was a bit surprised when Moonlight wasn't renewed, as ratings were decent and from what I remember, ratings were growing along with a loyal fan base. Maybe it was more expensive than the alternatives.
     
  2. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Teays...
    My wife was pi**ed! She loved that show.

    I was ticked when Smith (CBS) was canned 3 weeks into the season. How can you tell about a show after 3 weeks?

    It makes me not want to try new shows, especially the serial dramas, because they might get canned after you get into the storyline. If a sitcom gets canned, well I might have gotten a few laughs while it was on.

    I will be recording NCIS:LA and see what happens. If it still on come spring, then I might give it a try. If it gets canned, then I delete it without watching it. The networks kind of bring this behavior on themselves and it is only going to get worse as more and more get DVR's.
     
  3. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    The cancellation of "Moonlight" was a very bad decision by the CBS suits. They replaced it with a disaster and, with what we know today, lost the "weren't we smart" bragging rights for anticipating the vampire trend. Dumb, dumb, dumb.

    But that's alright, this year CBS is paying Alex O'Loughlin to be in "Three Rivers" as transplant surgeon Dr. Andy Yablonskiis to handle dead people's organs which is equally gruesome. This time he gets to be on Sunday night opposite Sunday night football, "Desperate Housewives", and Fox's animated "Family Guy" and "American Dad". They'll be wondering why the show won't pull more than "Moonlight" but it'll kill "Cold Case" which has it's own following.:nono2:
     
  4. bicker1

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    Some would argue, given how many of those shows are quirky or have fantastical elements, that networks make a bad decision whenever they decide to offer a show with any of these characteristics -- really anything other than CSI, Law and Order, NCIS, etc.
     
  5. phrelin

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    Northern...
    I'd agree except for "Moonlight" which was just another crime procedural with that vampire twist. If CBS had left it alone it would have pulled a decent Friday rating - it couldn't have been that expensive to make and had real international distribution and cable channel syndication potential in my opinion. But that's now spilt milk under the bridge.:rolleyes:
     
  6. RasputinAXP

    RasputinAXP Kwisatz Haderach of Cordcuttery

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    I just have to say that man, Castle was really good and House was especially great for a 2 hour season opener.

    Can't wait for Dollhouse on Friday.
     
  7. phrelin

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    Northern...
    Yep. Could be a good season.
     
  8. mreposter

    mreposter Hall Of Fame

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    Yep, and as you said it had strong international and syndication potential.

    This one looks like a real stinker. If it's still around by January I'd be surprised.
     
  9. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Now I know why I have 3 HD DVRS....I watch only ONE of all those shows....whereas the XX chromosomes in the house watch most of the rest. :D
     
  10. bicker1

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    My wife and I liked Moonlight, but I fully acknowledge that it was pretty marginal in appeal to the broader (especially key demographic) audience. What's worse, CBS was paying Warner Brothers for those sucky ratings. It might have been different if CBS was to be the beneficiary of all that "international and syndication potential", but that simply wasn't the case.

    Viewers and viewer advocates often disparage the extent of vertical integration we have today, with so many broadcasters now having their own production houses, but there is no denying that vertical integration serves the best interests of viewers with regard to giving new shows a chance.
     
  11. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    You bring up a good point. The model has to change for independent production companies.

    The "unaffiliated" production companies need to have an affordable "plan B" which sets the budget for these shows. If they do sell it to the broadcast networks in a contract that allows the network to back out, then that's a potential windfall.

    But as an example, "Moonlight" could have been budgeted for an immediate transition to and continuation on Syfy in the U.S. at near syndication prices. It had already gained distribution in places like Poland. And it easily would have had a 2+ million audience on Syfy.

    I suppose these business models will change over time.
     
  12. bicker1

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    Syfy is owned by yet a third company, so that throws another wrench into the machine, but more importantly, would actors, writers and directors accept a contract which says that if the show is broadcast on a major network then their paycheck will be $X but if it is moved to cable then they get $Y? I doubt it. People can make up rationalizations for why they shouldn't be expected to accept such conditions, but that's irrelevant since that just underscores the dis-incentive for production companies and broadcasters to pursue such approaches.
     
  13. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Northern...
    I agree.

    And I suppose that Alex O'Loughlin can say he's getting star pay in another prime time broadcast network show, so why would he ever settle. At least until he's associated with enough one-season canceled series that no one will hire him.

    So I suppose the only successful model is going to be vertical integration. Unlike "Moonlight" which CBS dumped, Alex O'Loughlin's new series "Three Rivers" is a CBS Paramount Network Television production on CBS. O'Loughlin has a better chance for multiple seasons this time around.
     

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