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Setup question

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Mike32280, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. Mike32280

    Mike32280 AllStar

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    Oct 11, 2007
    Havent visted this site or posted for quite some time....I got a new TV for the bedroom yesterday, so I now finally need to upgrade my SD TiVo box (don't even know the model, it's about 7-8 yrs old) to an HDDVR....I currently have 2 HR20's and have them hard wired into my router with Whole Home active, with a SWM8. I'm thinking about going with the HR34 instead of a HR2x, and adding it to my network.

    Just to confirm, this will allow me access to all 9 tuners/3 playlists from all 3 TVs, and all that will need to be done to accomplish this is upgrade my SWM to a SWM16, correct?

    Also, what is the difference between "supported" and non-supported MVR...


    Thanks!
     
  2. NR4P

    NR4P Dad

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    If you get a HR34, confirming you will need to upgrade the SWM8 to a SWM16 due to the number of tuners. SWM8 maxes out at 8.

    Supported means you don't use ethernet cabling to each DVR.

    You will be able to run CAT5 to the HR34 as a bridge. Only the 34 can do the bridge function.
    Then for each other HR20 you add a DECA box to rear of unit.
    No CAT5 to each HR20, just the DECA boxes.
    The HR34 doesn't need a separate DECA box, its built in.
     
  3. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Since the HR20s are already wired and working fine with WHDS, it is hard to imagine why you would want to re-connect them via DECA.

    DIRECTV will probably want to do it when they do their professional installation but it appears to be unnecessary in this situation.
     
  4. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    Actually, connecting them to the DECA cloud has the advantage of keeping the MRV traffic off of the router.
     
  5. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

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    On the road...
    Is using the HR34 as the bridge (instead of a CCK) a "supported" configuration? I'm wondering why the installer was jumping through so many hoops to get a CCK working in my system when he installed the HR34. The ethernet switch that he was connecting the CCK to was right next to the HR34.
     
  6. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, although every installer might not be up to date.
     
  7. Mike32280

    Mike32280 AllStar

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    Oct 11, 2007
    BINGO!
     
  8. Mike32280

    Mike32280 AllStar

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    Oct 11, 2007
    Also, out side of the method of the wiring, and the advantage of keep the traffic off my network, are there any differences to the functionality to supported/nonsupported or as having my account coded as such with D*
     
  9. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    If you have unsupported MRV and you have an issue with MRV, DirecTV will not help you out.

    - Merg
     
  10. jcwest

    jcwest Legend

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    When you call in for the upgrade ask for "Retention Dept." They can offer you a much better deal than the regular CSR's can.

    Good luck.

    J C
     
  11. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Actually, this is taken care of by the router's built-in switch (assuming that you don't already use an outboard switch or switches). Unlike hubs, Wi-fi and DECA, switches keep most traffic from places that it doesn't need to go.
     
  12. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    About how much is that worth?
     
  13. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Actually dennisj00 is right and his information more appropriate/accurate in the DirecTV infrastructure world.
    Merg's information is worth alot - far more than the misinformation we see from Dish customers posting in DirecTV threads about a service and equipment they don't even use themselves. :rolleyes:
     
  14. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    Harsh, it's wonderful to post for posting sake, but you don't even read what you write!

    While a switch or router ports do isolate the traffic to designated ports, the bulk of DECA cloud traffic stays off the ROUTER, which is very desirable for the typical home network.
     
  15. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    I'm not questioning the importance or accuracy of Merg's information.

    I'm asking someone to put a value on DIRECTV's technical support of DECA.

    Much has been said about how valuable/important DIRECTV's technical support is, but few (if any) have expressed that value in terms of hours or dollars saved versus the assistance they got from DBSTalk.

    This is about making informed decisions on how to optimize and maintain one's system, not fanboy dogma.
     
  16. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Good post Dennis. Maybe now the Dish posters endlessly weaving in & out of the DirecTV threads will be all-the-more informed about something they don't even use themselves.
     
  17. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    The typical home network is running a lot of Wi-fi clients and as such, none of them will see any WHDS traffic. If you have a lot of wired clients, you're probably running outboard switches that also isolate the traffic to relatively specific paths. Either way, traffic that isn't destined for a device probably doesn't appear at the network adapter for that device.

    Applying old school reasoning to modern networking is not helping people to understand what's going on.
     
  18. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    That's a great statement, however, I have no idea what it means.

    You have to realize that the people that visit DBSTalk have somewhat of a clue that their DVR is network capable. You also have to realize that this represents a SMALL minority of DirecTV (or even Dish) customers.

    The majority may have a home network, but they have no clue as to what's going on. So there's very little you or I or Directv installers can do to help them understand what's going on.

    That's basically the design of Directv's DECA installation and support. The user doesn't have to understand what's going on. It just works. It's the other part of that home network that complicates life. Read the threads about problems with Nomad -- a simple ethernet connection!

    I've seen problems with friends and business acquaintances home network that range from a wireless connection to their neighbors wireless to dual runs to a switch - installed by a 'professional' from the Geek squad, mis-matched pairs that work sometimes. . . all of these can create havoc on the home network.

    The DirecTV support is valuable -- maybe not to the DBStalk aware customer (and certainly not to YOU!), but it was a smart decision to not pull an ethernet cable to each dvr.
     

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