Sling TV opens its doors to all cord-cutters

Discussion in 'Internet Streaming Services' started by Athlon646464, Feb 9, 2015.

  1. Coachbulldog

    Coachbulldog Member

    88
    21
    Nov 17, 2014
    Utah
    I don't know how realistic this scenario is, but I could see an internet provider like Comcast establishing a model where a customer will have their internet capped unless they bundle their internet with one of Comcast's television packages.
     
  2. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,541
    617
    Dec 2, 2010
    Monterey...
    They sure wouldn't have any qualms about that, but they won't out and out say that, as it could bring a suit. As in lawsuit.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. anex80

    anex80 Legend

    279
    23
    Jul 29, 2005
    Midwest
    The savings may not be as much as you think. For instance, in my case, I was paying $85/month for DTV. I decided to experiment with cutting the cord thinking I could save close to that amount but it was no where near.

    First of all, I wanted DVR capability for at least my locals, which I received OTA. I opted to go with the TiVo Roamio OTA, with an upfront cost of $50 and a monthly cost of $15. I didn't count the cost of Netflix or Amazon Prime as I already had those and would carry them regardless of whether or not I had pay tv service. I did go through and figure up how much it would cost if I purchased all of the cable shows I watch from Amazon or iTunes and that broke down to $100, or about $8/month.

    In addition to those options, I was very intrigued at the ability of streaming ESPN channels without a cable subscription, so I signed up for SlingTV. That ended up costing me an additional $25/month (I added the sports package).

    At this point I was still saving close to $40/month over cable. Not as big of a savings as I had initially hoped but still enough to make it feel worthwhile. What threw me for a loop, however, is what happened next.

    So I'm going along streaming my shows online and loving life. Even catching a sports game or two on Sling, and then my Internet bill comes. Apparently I had exceeded my monthly data usage limit by 40GB and I was warned that next time I would be charged an overage fee.

    I started modifying the bandwidth settings on as many apps as possible and trying to limit the amount of time we spent streaming but quickly realized that effort was futile. I was checking my data usage daily and calculating what that would amount to over 1 months time. I became my father who used to run through the house turning off lights and shutting doors to save energy costs, only I was doing it with bandwidth. I discovered quickly that my current data cap was too low to satisfy my needs so I called my ISP and upgraded to a new plan.

    I was now paying $20/month more for Internet than I was before, bringing my total cord-cutting cost experiment savings to a net of $17/month. PLUS I became the bandwidth nazi and was honestly wondering how long it would take before I would have to upgrade my Internet plan again, making it more expensive to cut the cord.

    So, needless to say, my experiment didn't last long before I re-activated my DTV account and moved on a much happier payTV subscriber knowing that the grass truly isn't always greener on the other side.

    I realize every situation is unique and not all of this will apply to everyone. For instance, someone who doesn't watch any sports and has an ISP with no data limits would probably fare much better than I did. I simply wanted to share my experience and point out that there is a lot more cost involved in cutting the cord than you may first realize.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  4. Athlon646464

    Athlon646464 Yada Yada Yada DBSTalk Gold Club

    4,046
    530
    Feb 23, 2007
    Uxbridge, MA
    And who is your ISP?

    Interesting story by the way.
     
  5. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,650
    401
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    On the purposing of your internet connection examples...

    If you have high-speed internet but barely use it except for streaming... then the argument could be made that you should save money by dropping to a lower speed of internet, right? Same argument as payTV where you are "paying for channels you don't watch" if you are "paying for bandwidth on your internet that you don't need"...

    That's what I'm getting at. IF you need the high-speed for your internet browsing, then streaming TV is a take-away from that availability and thus has some amount of cost associated... IF your streaming TV doesn't interfere with your other internet usage, then it is a sign you were overpaying for internet and paying for bandwidth you previously didn't need, so that has a cost associated that now goes with the streaming.

    That's why I say there should be some non-zero cost of internet associated with your streaming.

    I see similar discussions on other forums where people discuss using gift cards to buy something and say "That movie was priced $15 but I had a $10 gift card so it only cost me $5!" Which isn't true... it still cost them $15 total, but only $5 of their cash. That gift card was worth the same as $10 cash and could have been used for anything... so wasting it on a bad purchase doesn't mean you didn't still waste it.

    Coupons give discounts... gift cards are cash.

    Your cost of internet, once you add streaming services, should get divided up into some proportion for your streaming use and the rest for your other internet access usage. It will be important going forward to know that metric IF more people switch to streaming and the prices of things begin to change from what they are now.
     
  6. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

    6,266
    136
    Jun 6, 2009
    If you have a PC with Windows 7, you already have Media Center which does all of that, plus more. You may need a tuner card or dongle, but those are fairly inexpensive and there are no recurring fees. They usually have their own software too which emulates a DVR.
     
  7. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

    6,266
    136
    Jun 6, 2009
    And you can add as big a hard drive as you want for storage with none of the limitations that might apply to stand alone units.
     
  8. sregener

    sregener Godfather

    630
    27
    Apr 17, 2012
    Everyone's situation is different. I have 40Mbps HSI, with no caps. I need 10. I basically am, in your words, paying for bandwidth I don't need. Which is absolutely true. However, it is the lowest speed available from my provider. To get a slower speed, I would need to switch to another provider, and the only option is a very unreliable and poor customer service one.

    I need HSI for my job. I need it to work. Now that I have it, I see no additional cost in using streaming services for other things. Should I get a different job or move to an area with different ISP choices, that could change. But for right now, I have plenty of "spare" bandwidth for Sling that costs me nothing to use.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

    5,455
    233
    Feb 27, 2006
    Newfoundland...
    Agree, I don't know anyone whom doesn't have high speed Internet this day and age.

    And theses people also have Directv, Dish,and Cable.

    So it's not like a person is going from not having internet since they've subscribed to pay tv , and now all of a sudden subscribing to internet just to do streaming only service. They/us already have it.
    I've had High speed internet since 2006.

    So if I decided to drop pay tv and subscribe and keep , Amazon,Netflix,Hulu and the $20 with my Internet I currently have, I could still save $80 to 100 a month.

    Not bad!
    But I'm also giving up a lot, but I couldn't find a way to save that king of money with any satellite or cable provider as an existing customer.
     
  10. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

    7,401
    218
    Apr 22, 2002
    Kansas City KS
    You were late to HSI :) - I got DSL in Summer 2000.

    I don't really need what I have now (2 M up, 20M down) but I'm not too sure I want to downgrade too much either. In fact, I've thought about going up to the next tier (5M up, 30 M down).
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,650
    401
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    Perhaps... but look at the arguments from most cord-cutters... They will say "the cost of payTV is too much, and I'm paying for channels I don't even watch" as reasons they go to streaming. So, logically, they should apply this same metric to their internet use. If, as in your example, you are paying for 40Mbps but only really need 10 Mbps... you might say "I want a lower tier for just the bandwidth I use" just like the payTV customer wants a lower package tier that only includes channels he watches.

    You say you have no choice, unless you go to another less-reliable ISP for your internet... which is ironically the same thing the payTV customer has as his option... go to a less reliable TV content provider :) But in the case of TV, they are making that choice.

    It's certainly a valid choice for some... but it depends on how you do things.

    IF I only shop at retail locations that exist between my work and my home, then I don't have to count much of my gas/car usage towards my shopping costs since I would be going that route to work anyway. But every detour off that path should be counted... so if I start working out at an exercise place in the opposite direction from where I work... The cost of that gym membership is the membership fee + the cost of gas + the cost of extra wear on my car. I wouldn't say "I have a car anyway" or "it already had gas in it"... I have to weigh the total cost of that gym membership to see if the value I get in return is worth the full cost to get it.

    I'm encouraging people to think about that when they switch and "cord cut" so that they aren't surprised later. Believe me, some will be surprised later.
     
  12. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

    2,062
    239
    Oct 30, 2013
    Seaside Oregon
    I have about 65 Mbps here and I would rather have more than I need, as if more people get online streaming in the area, I never need to worry about freezing, etc. Anyway we really do not have a choice, 60+ is the norm now. Charter got complaints at 30 Mbps of too many online that caused issues I guess, so they doubled it. Out here where I live in the country, not a lot have High Speed. Charter does offer higher rates too, but I would never use it. With the Roku streaming as well as my son streaming his video game or Netflex, we never have any issues. I have friends in the cities that get 4-5 on DSL that are always complaining.
     
  13. sregener

    sregener Godfather

    630
    27
    Apr 17, 2012
    I think my ISP has bandwidth to spare. For $5/month more, I could get 70Mbps. And I do enjoy the extra speed of 40 when I'm downloading things. I just don't need it. It doesn't sit always idle, just mostly. I look at it as my paying for the fiber to my house and the upkeep of their equipment. I'm not overpaying for the faster speed. If I switched to Mediacom, I'd be paying the same or more for 15Mbps. And I'd get Mediacom's reliability as an added "bonus."

    I think the bundling argument is an attempt to explain the high prices. I don't think it does. The prices are high because most people will pay them. Most people who price out streaming realize the truth that has been argued here time and time again: a la carte is more expensive. And people still think in "channels" rather than in programming. True a la carte is pay per view - no bundling of unwanted programming with the shows you want. Why are we still paying for ESPN's coverage of hockey when all we really want it for is tennis and football? Why pay for all the HGTV programs when all we want is "Love it Or List It?" That's the reality - we're still buying (smaller) bundles when we buy channels rather than programs.

    SlingTV is another channel bundle with a unique (for now) delivery system. It may be the future, or it may not. It is not a la carte. It is not "cord cutting" in the traditional sense. It's just a smaller and much cheaper pay TV option with no contract and no equipment to buy (provided you already have a Roku or the like.) SlingTV isn't an incentive to cord cut so much as it is an attempt to collect some money from the many who have cut the cord.
     
  14. Wilf

    Wilf Legend

    447
    22
    Oct 15, 2008
    I would argue that the cost of "transmitting" broadband TV is similar to, or less than OTA transmission. Therefore, ad supported broadband TV should be free to the customer (except for broadband subscription). Therefore, SlingTV is overpriced. (maybe a little tongue-in-cheek here).
     
  15. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

    5,455
    233
    Feb 27, 2006
    Newfoundland...
    People are also paying for channels they don't need or don't watch with every provider.
     
  16. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

    5,455
    233
    Feb 27, 2006
    Newfoundland...
    Agree, they will be surprised.
    But so far I've seen you can subscribe to quite a few services via streaming only and save quite a bit of money.

    But my case and many others ,OTA is not an option, and IMO a deal breaker when it comes to cord cutting.
     
  17. sregener

    sregener Godfather

    630
    27
    Apr 17, 2012
    I've known a few people who have been satisfied with the offerings of Netflix+Hulu Plus, but I think for most people, this is at true statement. OTA is a key component in making cord-cutting work, and there remains a need for a simple, cost-effective DVR without a monthly subscription fee. And I'm not talking about Windows Media Center or something like it - while I'm an IT guy, I crave the simplicity of a simple DVR. I'm fortunate to have a still-working DTVPal DVR, though I wish they'd fixed a few software glitches before abandoning it.

    However, most people have the ability to make OTA work. It is not nearly as difficult as it was in the analog days.
     
  18. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

    6,266
    136
    Jun 6, 2009
    ^^ I think there are a couple out there. Doesn't ChannelMaster still make one?

    A qucik search on Amazon finds these:

    4 Tuners, max 2 TB EHD (not included). Not sure about guide data

    http://www.amazon.com/Tablo-HDTV-Antennas-4-Tuner-Wi-Fi/dp/B00MWLZR0I/ref=sr_1_3?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1424087672&sr=1-3&keywords=tv+dvr+ota

    Single tuner, converter box type unit also takes up to a 2TB EHD


    http://www.amazon.com/Mediasonic-HW180STB-HomeWorx-Converter-Recording/dp/B00IYETYX8/ref=sr_1_7?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1424087672&sr=1-7&keywords=tv+dvr+ota
     
  19. Wilf

    Wilf Legend

    447
    22
    Oct 15, 2008
    The options for cord-cutters are many as exemplified by this guide: http://www.heronfidelity.com/blog/cord-cutting-guide.html
     

Share This Page

spam firewall

Advertisements