So which Transponders are the RB Transponders on?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by dreadlk, Dec 24, 2018.

  1. dreadlk

    dreadlk Hall Of Fame

    1,666
    21
    Sep 18, 2007
    Earth
    I have heard that they are on 99 and 103 but are they in the unused area when looking at the transponder list on an HR24 or do they show up as new sats like 103Rb and 99Rb on an HR54?

    Also I have a Directv meter, the older kind and I remember reading something about the only new feature on the newer version is that it wont overload and burn out if connected to some piece of new directv equipment because it has a 10db built in attenuation pad. What is the piece of equipment that can blow out the meter?

    Thanks and Merry Xmas.
     
  2. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    9,322
    1,090
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    They show up as 99cr and 103cr on any equipment that is configured for a reverse band LNB.
     
    dreadlk likes this.
  3. dreadlk

    dreadlk Hall Of Fame

    1,666
    21
    Sep 18, 2007
    Earth
    Thanks, BTW how many of them have a signal strength indication?
     
  4. KyL416

    KyL416 Hall Of Fame

    5,109
    860
    Nov 10, 2005
    Tobyhanna, PA
    Check the transponder maps, last week they uplinked test feeds for most of the CONUS channels from 95 and 119 to 13 transponders on 99cr.
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2018
  5. dreadlk

    dreadlk Hall Of Fame

    1,666
    21
    Sep 18, 2007
    Earth
    Just out of curiosity what kind of signal levels are you getting on 103CR and 99CR and how badly are they effected by rain fade?
    I assume the ones using the really high frequencies must drop out even faster than the normal Ka transponders.
     
  6. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    9,322
    1,090
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    Reverse band is a slightly lower frequency - 17.3 - 17.7 GHz, versus 18.3 - 18.8 and 19.7 - 20.2 GHz for Ka lo & Ka hi, respectively. Should be affected by rain fade similarly to Ka.
     
  7. dreadlk

    dreadlk Hall Of Fame

    1,666
    21
    Sep 18, 2007
    Earth
    Thanks, but I thought one part of the RB signal was in a very low frequency range and one was on a very high freq range?

    What kind of signal levels are you getting, in the 90s?
     
  8. slice1900

    slice1900 Well-Known Member

    9,322
    1,090
    Feb 14, 2013
    Iowa
    I don't have a reverse band capable LNB.

    All satellite signals have two components, the uplink frequency (from Directv's broadcast centers to the satellite) and the downlink (from satellite to customer) The latter is the only one that matters for rain fade. Well technically it is possible for a super heavy rain to fade out the uplink even from the giant dishes they use, which is one of the reasons they have backup (diversity) sites.

    The downlink for Ku is 11.7 - 12.2 (or is it 12.2 - 12.7 can't remember) and the uplink is 17.3 - 17.8 (yes the same frequency as reverse band's downlink, which is why people started calling it 'reverse band') The uplink for reverse band is 24.05 - 24.45 or thereabouts, and the uplinks for Ka are in the 28/29 GHz range. Those latter ranges are among those that will eventually be used for 5G.
     
    dreadlk likes this.
  9. HoTat2

    HoTat2 Hall Of Fame

    7,645
    213
    Nov 16, 2005
    Los...
    Specifically speaking, the frequencies are;

    Ku (DBS):
    Uplink = 17.3 - 17.8 GHz
    Downlink = 12.2 - 12.7 GHz

    Ka-lo Band:
    Uplink = 28.35 - 28.6 GHz and 29.250 to 29.5 GHz
    Downlink = 18.3 - 18.8 GHz

    Ka-hi Band:
    Uplink = 29.5 - 30 GHz
    Downlink = 19.7 - 20.2 GHz

    *Reverse Band:
    Uplink = 24.75 - 25.15 GHz
    Downlink = 17.3 - 17.7 GHz

    Ku (FSS) Band used by WD service:
    Uplink = 14.0 - 14.5 GHz
    Downlink = 11.7 - 12.2 GHz

    *Note: Only for RB service to the U.S.

    Uplink is 24.750 - 25.250; Downlink = 17.3 - 17.8 GHz for other countries.


    Sent from my LG-H932 using Tapatalk
     

Share This Page