1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Some advice for pre-wiring

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by rstambo, Sep 2, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Sep 2, 2006 #1 of 21
    rstambo

    rstambo Cool Member

    10
    0
    Sep 2, 2006
    My apolgies if this is the wrong forum, but it does have to do with the HR20..

    I am re-doing a few rooms in our new house and will have the walls open. I am going to upgrade to HD as soon as I am done, and want to go with the HR20.
    (utilizing the movers connection, since I am currently not living there)

    How many coax lines should I run from the den (where the HR20 will live).
    Also, since I believe the dish will be going on the roof, (or high up on the side of the house) and advice as to where I home run the coax?

    I can go basement or attic, both are open and have easy access. Looking for some guidance here, as I have a unique chance to do it right and make all the runs while the walls are open..

    Thanks
     
  2. Sep 2, 2006 #2 of 21
    litzdog911

    litzdog911 Well-Known Member

    12,239
    69
    Jun 23, 2004
    Mill Creek, WA
    Your new 5-LNB Ka/Ku AT9 dish will have four cables from its integrated multiswitch. Those should run to a convenient location (attic or basement) where your Zinwell WB68 8-output multiswitch will go (if you need more than four lines).

    Each DVR should have two satellite coax cables, one for each tuner. You may also want to run cable(s) for an over-the-air antenna if you plan to include that in your setup (the HR20 also has built-in ATSC tuners for local over-the-air HDTV channels). So I would suggest running 3 cables from the Den to your home run location where your multiswitch should be located. I might even suggest running 5 cables if you plan to add a second DVR or additional DirecTV receivers in the future. Much easier to run them now than later.
     
  3. Sep 2, 2006 #3 of 21
    Ben_jd

    Ben_jd AllStar

    74
    0
    Aug 21, 2006
    Does the MPEG-4 bandwidth "overlay" the OTA bandwidth requiring the third line (instead of merely splitting the signal at the location of use)?
     
  4. Sep 2, 2006 #4 of 21
    litzdog911

    litzdog911 Well-Known Member

    12,239
    69
    Jun 23, 2004
    Mill Creek, WA

    Correct. The Ka/Ku AT9 5-LNB dish's integrated multiswitch "band translates" the different satellite signals, and some of those bands occupy the same frequencies as over-the-air channels.
     
  5. Sep 2, 2006 #5 of 21
    Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

    13,447
    0
    Jun 19, 2006
    While you're running lines, you should also run a phone line as well as an Ethernet line to each room as well.
     
  6. Sep 2, 2006 #6 of 21
    captain_video

    captain_video Icon

    808
    0
    Nov 21, 2005
    If you're installing the RG6 cable yourself then make sure you get the right kind. DTV recommends using only solid copper core 18 gauge RG-6. Most RG6 is copper clad steel and is not the correct type of cable for use with the wideband signals coming off both the Ka and Ku satellites. Belden 1694A is an excellent choice for this purpose but it can be somewhat expensive. The best price I found for it is at Tri-State Electronics.

    You should also be using compression connectors instead of the old crimp style. You can find Thomas & Betts universal RG6 compression connectors on ebay fairly cheap, usually about $10-15 for a 50-pack of connectors or even less if you buy them in larger quantities. Compression tools range all prices but unless you need the tool for other types of connectes you can usually find an adequate tool on ebay for about $15-20.

    You've already received good suggestion on the number and types of cables to run to each room. I'd run three RG6 lines at a minimum along with two CAT-5 ethernet cables, which can also be used for phone lines if need be. Get yourself some keystone outlet covers with at least 4-6 slots for keystone inserts. You can buy inserts for coax, ethernet, or phone connections, among others, and blanks for the ones you don't use.
     
  7. Sep 4, 2006 #7 of 21
    npudar

    npudar New Member

    2
    0
    Aug 19, 2006
    The AT9 dish has four coax lines coming from it. However, the HR20 only has three coax inputs. If I only have one HR20 box in my family room, and I run the four lines, what do I do with them?

    Separate, but related question: On my current (very old) installation, I use the UHF/VHF output from my DirecTV receiver and send it to other monitors/TVs in the house (yes I know they all have to watch the same channel, but that is what I wanted). Since the HR20 does not have the UHF/VHF output, I'm thinking of keeping the original receiver and paying the incremental amount for a second one. Will I be able to use the AT9 dish as a satellite feed? Is that what the fourth coax line can be used for? If not, what would I have to do (assuming it's possible)? Thanks.
    Nick
     
  8. Sep 4, 2006 #8 of 21
    Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

    13,447
    0
    Jun 19, 2006
    The HR20 has two satellite inputs, so you would run two lines from the AT9 to the HR20.

    Yep, just run another line from the dish.
     
  9. Sep 4, 2006 #9 of 21
    rlgold88

    rlgold88 Godfather

    328
    0
    Aug 30, 2006
    If only 4 lines come out of the at9 and I already am using 4 tuners Two hr10-250. How to make 4 lines to 6?

    I have read about a multiswitch Zinwell WB68 in some of these forums, is this what I need for the 6 hd tuners? Will it work with my equipment ?


    By the way I am picking up the hr20 on sept 6 from bestbuy in michigan, But install of the AT9 dish is not until Sept 28.

    Is it possible to connect the hr20 to the old dish or should I wait for the install?

    Should I buy a switch before hand or will the installer have one for me?

    Any help appreaciated!!!
     
  10. Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

    13,447
    0
    Jun 19, 2006
    Yep, that's exactly what you need.
    The HR20 will work just fine with any dish. However, you will not get the MPEG4 locals. If you have a Phase III dish, which you probably do if you have the HR10, you will be able to watch all of the national HD channels.
    The installer will have a switch for you.
     
  11. rlgold88

    rlgold88 Godfather

    328
    0
    Aug 30, 2006
    Thanks alot for the info
     
  12. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,520
    958
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    Another option to consider is running the composite outputs of the HR20 into a separate UHF modulator and feed that signal to your other TV's. Then you still only need one receiver.

    There are several brands and models of external modulators available. I am using both a CE1001ST and a Channel Plus 3025. Both work well. The CE1001ST will give you stereo audio while the CP3025 only provides mono.

    Carl
     
  13. bootylactin

    bootylactin Cool Member

    21
    0
    Aug 27, 2006
    Captain_Video, thanks for this excellent post. I'm getting ready to upgrade the crappy coax that was pre-installed in our house, and this post has given me a great start. I've never done any wiring of this kind before, so I have a couple of other questions.

    In looking on ebay, I've seen "coax strippers" mentioned in some of the compression tool auctions, such as this one.. First, is the tool in that auction suitable for what I want to do, and second, do I need a coax stripper? Also, having absolutely no prior equipment for this type of job, is there anything else I may need?

    Also, with regard the keystone inserts, is there a "special type" that carries the Ka Ku signal better (like the Belden cable you mentioned above), or will any old coax insert work?

    Thanks in advance for any replies!
     
  14. sao309

    sao309 New Member

    6
    0
    Sep 19, 2006
    carl6, can you tell me exactly how to set up the modulator or send me to a link with some directions. Thanks!!
     
  15. PoitNarf

    PoitNarf New Member

    4,880
    0
    Aug 19, 2006
    That compression tool looks ok, but keep in mind that not all compression tools will work with all brands of compression connectors! I have a tool made by Ideal and use the Ideal compression connectors. Picked these up from Home Depot and I'm pleased with it.

    A coax stripper is a must for an easy and professional install. It's a pain to get everything stripped and cut correctly just using a pair of wire cutters. You'll appreciate the clean job and the time saved by using a strippper.
     
  16. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

    12,520
    958
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    See my lengthy post in the thread linked below. Buy a modulator. For your use, I would suggest the CE Labs 1001ST - good unit with strong output signal, and gives you stereo sound. But there are others also, so find what's best for you.

    Connect the composite (yellow-red-white) output of your DVR to the modulator inputs.

    Send the modulator output (on whatever channel you program it to) to your remote location, or get more complex like I describe in the linked thread.

    http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?p=659022#post659022

    Carl
     
  17. sao309

    sao309 New Member

    6
    0
    Sep 19, 2006
    Carl, I have one DVR...HD DirecTV TiVo. I want to send that signal to all TV's in my house on channel 125. If I input the DVR to the Modulator using composite and then output on the cable line, will that work. I know it won't be HD but that's OK. Somehow, that seems to be too simple. I think I am missing a step. I have an RF remote to control the box in the remote rooms. Thanks for your time.
     
  18. tijean

    tijean New Member

    1
    0
    Jan 18, 2007
    We're remodeling our house and I'm a noob (apologies) so I would be very appreciative if you could provide your view on the following issue.

    As I said, we're having our house remodeled and I want to have the following set up:

    1. HR20 in bedroom with 2 lines in for an HDTV
    2. HR20 in family room with 2 lines in for an HDTV
    3. Samsung SIR-S4080R/TiVO in bedroom with 1 line in for a SD TV
    4. Samsung SIR-S4080R/TiVO in bedroom with 1 line in for a SDTV

    I'm having the electrician run coax (which I now understand needs to be RG6 18-gauge with solid copper core) from each of these locations to the outside of my house, right to where the 5 LNB dish will be mounted, where I plan to install a Zinwell WB68 multiswitch to connect the four cables coming from the dish to the six cables coming from inside the house as described above.

    My questions are:

    (1) Are there any problems with mounting the Zinwell WB68 outside?
    (2) Can you see any other problems with this setup?

    I sincerely appreciate any time you could spend in responding.
     
  19. azarby

    azarby Hall Of Fame

    4,130
    17
    Dec 15, 2006


    The switch can be outside, but it's best if its somewhat protected. I would run 2 lines to each room as in a couple of years, your existings boxes will not work with the mpeg 4 siganls and you will probably end up with new boxes that have two tuner and may require two inputs.

    Bob
     
  20. larryl

    larryl DBSTalk Club Member

    73
    0
    Jan 7, 2007
    You might want to consider running four coax cables from the dish to an inside location where you can set up a mini-wiring closet. Put your multi-switch there, then run triple coax to each location where you want a D* receiver (two for the sat signal, one for over-the-air). Run a coax from your over-the-air antenna to the wiring closet.

    With that cable setup you can distribute the sat signal and the over-the-air signal from the wiring closet to each location. Mine is in an attic with easy access. I can add amplifiers, multiplexers, splitters or any other expensive equipment from there with little effort. Everything is inside and protected from the rain and there is a minimal amount of wire running out to the dish.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page