Starlink opens to 'First Come First Served'

Discussion in 'Internet Streaming Services' started by 1948GG, Feb 9, 2021.

  1. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Gold Club DBSTalk Club

    52,667
    2,812
    Apr 17, 2003
    Michiana
    Seattle rates are lower than mine. Not much lower, but lower (except the GB plans which are the same cost).
     
  2. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

    1,258
    52
    Aug 4, 2007
    But seattle has competition for comcast, both by two other docsis cable providers (wave broadband and I can't remember the other company, neither of which have much overlay on their competitors area) but centurylink (the local telco, even covers where I live now) fiber has an extensive footprint across town (mostly on the north side) and is expanding big time (for years). Go further north and you hit the old gte area which of course got bought by Verizon and converted into FIOS. About the same time, circa 2001, Everett Cablevision which had been bought out by at&t in the 90's was scooped up by comcast, setting the stage for the nonsense I was in the middle of. I was there because there are 3 major transpacific and Alaska oceanic fiber systems landing stations there. Plus of course the worlds largest building and washington states longest single runway, Paine field and Boeing 747/767/kc46/787/777/777x assembly plant, plus I was born there. Took me 30 years to get back, after around the planet twice on your tax dollars.
     
  3. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    23,194
    491
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    A year from now we should know whether the technology actually supports the hopes/claims (or not).
     
  4. NYDutch

    NYDutch DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    923
    156
    Dec 28, 2013
    Yes... I think if the launches continue at a good pace, the results should be pretty good. But we'll have to wait and see of course. On another forum, someone was complaining that Starlink should cover the entire US before they start offering the service to other countries. They seemed not to understand that the same satellites that pass over Podunk USA can also serve East Overshoe Germany with zero impact on Podunk's service.
     
  5. CTJon

    CTJon Godfather

    979
    125
    Feb 5, 2007
    Article in local Maine paper about experience in remote areas where internet service really is the other older sat stuff. I guess it is pretty fast but a lot of interruptions. Several who have tried it also still use other service since they need reliable service.
    Time will tell
     
  6. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    23,194
    491
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    In the meantime, the hopeful/faithful will continue to hang their hats on Elon's optimistic tweets.
     
  7. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

    1,258
    52
    Aug 4, 2007
    Musk is an evangelist, like Jobs was. He has to be, going up against the largest manufacturing sector of the US economy (automobiles), where many attempts over the years ended up on the trash heap (worst in that he was at the same time taking on the oil industry). Good ****** luck!

    And now he's taking on one of the most entrenched industries in America, so hated that I'll wager if an average american with an assault rifle had the heads of the broadband companies and Bin Laden in front of them , they'd take out the broadband ceo's first.

    So yes, the push gets a bit hyper. More than a bit. Look at another company that tried to take broadband on, google fiber. Lots of hoopla at the start, but those with years in the industry (including myself), saw the major mistakes in their rollout, and saw the handwriting in the wall that it would fairly soon grind to a halt. Same with verizon FIOS, who tried to play games with entrenched cable operators. Both are on the trash heap.

    But I'll point to a least one place in the country where early intervention in local laws and regulations have resulted in an actual free market of suppliers and consumer choice.

    Austin, Texas, where I went to the university and lived for almost a decade in the 70's and 80's. Where the city council and cable commission decided early on not to assign one company to wire up the community (actually, pretty hard as by 1980 there was already two companies that overlapped each other over half the city).

    Today, there are at least 4 companies serving virtually the entire city, one of which is 100% ftth and another which is about half that. Competition is brutal.
    Note: just for fun, I thought I'd run a couple of the addresses I lived there back in the day. What I found makes me sick, for what I've had to live with in the last decade. Two fiber to the home, three coaxial providers, all with gigabit (fiber full duplex), all ~$45-48/ month. ****!

    So why did it work there, and almost nowhere else? Now we get into politics, and to point out that Austin and Travis county is a deep blue spot surrounded by deep red Texas. It is, after all, the hometown of LBJ, a major university town, so get a clue.

    Back to Musk. Hyperbolic, overly optimistic, you bet. But so far, he has accomplished more than Google Fiber and Verizon FIOS in shaking things up when it comes to broadband. Like I said in an earlier comment, decades of rate hikes and his project goes just a little live, and for the first time, rates drop. No correlation? I await more, thank you.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2021
  8. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    23,194
    491
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    If you consider column inches as "shaking things up", yes, he is winning that battle. The question is whether or not Starlink is providing affordable broadband service to those with few options and I believe it is too early to claim that among their accomplishments.
     
  9. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

    1,258
    52
    Aug 4, 2007
    No, I consider my bill going from $120+/month (where it's been for >3 years creeping up from $105 were it was when I moved to my present location 4+ years ago) to $80/month 4 months ago 'shaking thing up'.

    A year ago, US cellular started selling LTE/4g home internet in my area at about twice the price, $250+/month plus equipment charges. Still have the mailer. Got a call from TMobile 6 mos ago asking if I wanted to sign up for their LTE/4g service (original small white box) for $50/month. Looked interesting but passed until they did 5g on midband. They do now with Nokia 'trash can' device, now at $60/month, three months ago or so. Looks more interesting but they are having lots of firmware problems, will wait until they sort them out.

    Starlink got hyper sending out invites in my area (including me), installed an uplink about 50 miles down the freeway from me, 4 months ago. Within a month, comcast drops my bill by $40/month. Hmmm.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2021
    mjwagner likes this.
  10. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    23,194
    491
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    I'd imagine there's pressure from other players in your area as well as I'd doubt Comcast is running scared of Starlink in any cable-served areas.

    My local Comcast seems to counter each time CenturyLink (the incumbent telephone Local Exchange Carrier) runs an expansion campaign.
     
  11. NYDutch

    NYDutch DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

    923
    156
    Dec 28, 2013
    I suspect at this point, the only folks getting nervous about Starlink are at Hughes and Viasat. The cable/fiber folks have the more populated areas pretty well in hand, competing mainly among themselves. Starlink picking up the under served rural areas is likely ok with them since the potential subscriber density is often too spread out to be profitable for them.
     
  12. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

    1,258
    52
    Aug 4, 2007
    I, as well as many others it appears, have forgotten that Century Telphone, lately CenturyLink, changed their name yet again a few months ago to Lumen Technologies; I've done way too much work all over America for their divisions, and have been to their hq in Monroe, LA so many times I can't count; I actually lived in Lafayette where they built (unfortunately after I lived there) a great muni owned ftth plant. What? Deep red LA has a bastion of socialism right down the freeway from the state Capitol? Almost as bad as Austin, but they ARE the state Capitol. Geez!

    Who knows if it's really the wireless folks or Starlink or neither causing incumbents like comcast to react the way they have, or telcos like Lumen with their ftth. Like FIOS, they seem to have slowed down a bit (or more) lately but it may be covid as much as anything.

    Certainly Hughesnet and Viasat are shaking in their boots. I doubt that they'll be in existence 2-3 years from now. What many don't realize is what I've tried to point out several times here, that many folks even in the big cities, supposedly with large well financed broadband plants, have niches of neighborhoods skipped over, for whatever reason, that are salivating even more so than those out in the boonies. I've read so many comments on reddit and other boards from folks where on side of the street, or a suburb one block away has cable or fiber, but the company refuses to wire just a few feet across the road unless they get paid some rediculous amount to extend their system.

    In fact, I'm fairly certain that folks in that situation may be at least as many as those "out on the sticks". I would think/hope that Starlink won't bar those folks simply because the fcc 'says' their zipcode has broadband. My current zip is a couple hundred miles on a side, but just because my tiny corner of it has cable doesn't mean everyone one mile away from me has it.

    We shall see a year or two from now, how things turn out. The only thing that stays in my mind is that all of this could have happened 20 years ago if the folks back then had the balls to go forward on LEO sats.
     
    62Lincoln likes this.

Share This Page

spam firewall

Advertisements