Streaming - What exactly do the media giants have in mind?

Discussion in 'Internet Streaming Services' started by phrelin, Sep 20, 2019.

  1. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Today Barron's offered this article Are Streaming Rights for ‘The Big Bang Theory’ Really Worth $600 Million? which begins:

    Sell everything, quickly, and use the proceeds to buy distribution rights for Gilligan’s Island and ALF. The hottest trend in show business is to pay extravagant sums for temporary permission to stream old shows. The biggest shows are already spoken for, so it’s only a matter of time before bidding heats up for the B-list stuff. You’ll thank me after rampant ALF-flation sets in.​

    The article reflects what I already feel about streaming without the new streaming services: So Much Streaming, So Little Time....

    On average every week on (in alphabetical order) Acorn TV, Amazon Prime, CBS All Access, Hulu, Netflix, and PBS five new scripted series or scripted series seasons become available. In a ten day period beginning on Monday September 23, the day after the Emmy Awards, the big 4 broadcast networks begin their fall season and the next 20± days look like this for scripted series all of which will be streaming on Hulu or CBS All Access or something:
    1. The Good Doctor (ABC, Season 3)
    2. The Neighborhood (CBS, Season 2)
    3. Bob ♥ Abishola (CBS, new comedy series)
    4. All Rise (CBS, new drama series)
    5. Bull (CBS, Season 4)
    6. Bluff City Law (NBC, new drama series)
    7. 9-1-1 (Fox, Season 3)
    8. Prodigal Son (Fox, new drama series)
    9. The Conners (ABC, Season 2)
    10. Bless This Mess (ABC, Season 2)
    11. Mixed-ish (ABC, new comedy series)
    12. Black-ish (ABC, Season 6)
    13. Emergence (ABC, new drama series)
    14. NCIS (CBS, Season 17)
    15. FBI (CBS, Season 2)
    16. NCIS: New Orleans (CBS, Season 6)
    17. This Is Us (NBC, Season 4)
    18. New Amsterdam (NBC, Season 2)
    19. The Resident (Fox, Season 3)
    20. Empire (Fox, Season 6; final season)
    21. The Goldbergs (ABC, Season 7)
    22. Schooled (ABC, Season 2)
    23. Modern Family (ABC, Season 11; final season)
    24. Single Parents (ABC, Season 2)
    25. Stumptown (ABC, new drama series)
    26. Chicago Med (NBC, Season 5)Chicago Fire (NBC, Season 8)
    27. Chicago P.D. (NBC, Season 7)
    28. Grey’s Anatomy (ABC, Season 16)
    29. A Million Little Things (ABC, Season 2)
    30. How to Get Away with Murder (ABC, Season 6)
    31. Young Sheldon (CBS, Season 3)
    32. The Unicorn (CBS, new comedy series)
    33. Mom (CBS, Season 7)
    34. Carol’s Second Act (CBS, new comedy series)
    35. Evil (CBS, new drama series)
    36. Superstore (NBC, Season 5)
    37. Perfect Harmony (NBC, new comedy series)
    38. The Good Place (NBC, Season 4; final season)
    39. Sunnyside (NBC, new comedy series)
    40. Law & Order SVU (NBC, Season 21)
    41. American Housewife (ABC, Season 4)
    42. Fresh Off the Boat (ABC, Season 6)
    43. Hawaii Five-O (CBS, Season 10)
    44. Magnum P.I. (CBS, Season 2)
    45. Blue Bloods (CBS, Season 10)
    46. The Rookie (ABC, Season 2)
    47. NCIS: Los Angeles (CBS, Season 11)
    48. The Simpsons (Fox, Season 31)
    49. Bless the Harts (Fox, new animated comedy series)
    50. Bob’s Burgers (Fox, Season 10)
    51. Family Guy (Fox, Season 18)
    52. Poldark (PBS, Season 5; final season)
    53. The Durrells in Corfu (PBS, Season 4; final season)
    54. SEAL Team (CBS, Season 3)
    55. S.W.A.T. (CBS, Season 3)
    56. Almost Family (Fox, new drama series; fka Sisters)
    57. The Blacklist (NBC, Season 7)
    58. God Friended Me (CBS, Season 2)
    59. Madam Secretary (CBS, Season 6; final season)
    There are, of course, numerous non-scripted shows and The CW shows. And over the same period: Netflix will have added Criminal, The Politician, Peaky Blinders; Amazon Prime will have the next season of Goliath; Acorn TV offers Doc Martin Season 9; ... well you get the idea. Not that I watch every show, because who could?

    So, of course, I'm eagerly looking forward to reruns of Friends, right? Who is this valuable audience for reruns? I like what the article says: "Other clear winners include office workers still saying things like 'That’s gold, Jerry!' and 'Hello, Newman!' to blank looks from millennial colleagues."

    All I can think is that at some point this is going to cost me money in order to watch some show I want to watch because AT&T "outbid itself for The Big Bang Theory" and needs to recoup a billion bucks (yeah, it's complicated, see ‘The Big Bang Theory’ goes to AT&T’s HBO Max streaming service for over a billion).

    Oh well.... [​IMG]
     
  2. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Well, when everyone jumps on the bandwagon, eventually somebody gets bumped off. It may take several years to sort out, in the meantime the rich get richer and the rest of us get poorer. I am already up over $300/m in "entertainment" costs.

    :rolleyes:
     
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  3. billsharpe

    billsharpe Hall Of Fame

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    Does that include your beer, Nick? :oops:
     
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  4. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    No, beer is extra.
     
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  5. B. Shoe

    B. Shoe Mentor

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    What do the media giants have in mind? I have no idea. But here's what I think, over time, consumers will begin to become more selective in what they watch and subscribe to.

    Look at all of the shows the OP listed. Who has time to regularly watch half of that rundown? That doesn't even include live sports, news programming, or movies. Not to mention the day-to-day run of living our lives. For the longest time, we've all felt like we have to have all of these channels because "we've gotta have options", but we only watch a dozen or so channels on a regular basis. The direct-to-consumer product is here to stay, I think, and will become more prominent as time goes on.

    What does that mean? We piece together our packages, built specifically for what we as an individual consumer wants. It's not a la carte, but it's as slimmed down of a version as it most likely can be.
     
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  6. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Yup, don't think we will ever see a true a la carte option anywhere. Streaming is about as close as we can get at the moment.

    Rich
     
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  7. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    You are not alone. I don't want to think about how much "entertainment" costs us a month.

    Rich
     
  8. billsharpe

    billsharpe Hall Of Fame

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    Wife wants to see "Downton Abbey" in a theatre. That will add at least $12 to this month's entertainment charges. Local theatre has cheap afternoon senior price of $6.
     
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  9. SamC

    SamC Hall Of Fame

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    To get back to the topic, are well worn reruns from past decades really worth what these services are paying?

    The answer to that is, IMHO, no.

    First, these shows were on TV, over and over. At least three times on the networks that made them, and then many dozens of reruns on “general rerun” linear channels (TBS, USA, etc.).

    Bluntly everybody who want to see them, has.

    How interested in a 20 or 30 year old sitcom are people who have no memory of the era? There are exceptions (once called “evergreens” by syndicators, the best being Andy Griffith) but most shows age very quickly.

    So that leaves people who really want to see the same shows over and over and over and over and over. Leaving out sci-fi, really?

    Massive overbids.
     
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  10. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Yeah, massive is a good word for what they paid. I guess they can justify that. Don't see how, but what do I know?

    Rich
     
  11. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Ratings and ad dollars will tell you they didn’t overpay. I think the reason is several of these shows are so much better than anything else on tv that’s even new they still bring in the viewers. I can say a lot of the new shows this week aren’t nearly as entertaining as watching some of my old favorites from years ago.
     
  12. Rich

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    I'd say that about Seinfeld, Cheers and Frazier. I look forward to binging on Seinfeld.

    Rich
     
  13. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Frankly watching episodes of shows I've seen and generally remember within the first three minutes seems like such a waste of what little time I have left on Earth. But different strokes....
     
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  14. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    There are some shows that are worth seeing again ... sometimes because details are forgotten, sometimes because the characters were written so well that I want to see them again. The shows above fit in to that category for many people. For lesser shows I occasionally like to watch them again knowing the ending to see what hints were written in to the story before the big reveals. Unfortunately some shows fall apart on the second or subsequent watching if the writers changed a story arc. Then it just becomes a way of spotting deficiencies and leaving the viewing with a lower opinion of the show. (Which brings us back to well written shows with a canon and supported arcs.)
     
  15. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Now that Apple TV+ and Disney+ have launched with Peacock on the horizon I have to note that what makes the situation puzzling to me is how to measure the revenue potential given that in the early 1960's there were about 60 million U.S. TV homes with about 180 million viewers. Today there are 120 million TV homes and 300 million viewers. I realize that the international market has expanded potential revenue by a significant factor, but much as I try I cannot see the survival of all these streamers and I expect costs to subscribers to jump substantially within five years. But I'll enjoy it while I can.
     
  16. Eva

    Eva Active Member

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    And some cable outfits are now pushing streaming. One of my nephews recently moved and called a provider and he had a hard time trying to get normal cable boxes. They kept pushing "Stream on your device or phone." He did get his boxes though. I sometimes think someday shows will only be via streaming only and no more linear TV. Motor Trend (in the U.S.) is pushing their app really hard.
     

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