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Switch to Directv?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by btscott, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I'm sure there are too, maybe the biggest one is that Jodean can install it without the troubles he has with DirecTV. ;) :lol:
     
  2. carl6

    carl6 Moderator Staff Member DBSTalk Club

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    I honestly don't understand the need/desire for the HR24. I've got an HR24, two HR22's, and an HR21 active plus several other non 24's inactive at the moment. The HR24 is probably my least used DVR and I have absolutely no problem with any of the others. They are most certainly not "old technology".

    Further, while the HR24 may be the most current today, there is absolutely nothing that says it won't be "old technology" tomorrow, or next week, or next month. We absolutely know that DirecTV is developing newer hardware. We don't know when it will show up publicly.
     
  3. grassfeeder

    grassfeeder AllStar

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    True - I'd just rather my "old technology" be 1 generation old and not 3 generations old. As a new subscriber, and given the inability to upgrade hardware easily - as I've always been able to with cable - I'd rather start at the top. I've built a pretty solid home entertainment system and would like to stay as much ahead of the curve as I can. I'm that guy that upgrades equipment every couple of years. Financially irresponsible - perhaps - but it's who I am......I'm also the guy who's had a car payment every year since I was 18. It is what it is.
     
  4. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Since money doesn't matter, then why not order 24s from available online retailers?
     
  5. grassfeeder

    grassfeeder AllStar

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    I'm not saying money doesn't matter - I'm not THAT free with it. I sell everything when upgrading to recoup costs and am strategic when doing so.

    I just don't think that I should have to start off on square one already 2-3 revisions behind the curve. When the 34 box is released, I'll have no issues still having the 24 - that is until I want to take advantage of RVU but that's another topic for a different day.

    If I have to commit two years to a piece of technology, I want to at least leave the starting blocks the right way.

    Is that unreasonable?
     
  6. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I always felt the best policy regarding the obsession with obtaining Hx24 units would be this:

    1. If you get any discount on the receiver, then you get whatever model you get.
    2. If you're paying the $199 for the HR or $99 for the H, then you can pick.
     
  7. btscott

    btscott New Member

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    I have not fully decided yet. I have NBA League Pass and will make final decision after the NBA regular season is over.

    I have two TV's to cover. I want both TV's to have their own DVR and would want them to share recording via Whole Home DVR...

    Regarding some of the differences:

    I rarely used PIP, but it a nice addition.

    The OTA is also nice, but with the ability to share recordings between receivers should be fine as I no longer will have to record the same programs on both DVR's so I can watch on whatever TV I choose.

    I do like the guide display on Dish. What is the big difference between the two?

    I wired my home for Ethernet so not worried about network connectivity.

    Seems like YES Network has been worked out which is a big plus for Directv.

    Regarding dishes, I am pointed at three satellites (110, 119, 129) now with two dishes what will the Directv setup look like? Can they reuse the existing poles or do they need to redrill. Hate putting new holes in my roof.

    Regarding connectivity at the TV. Do I need two RG-6 wires? I currently have two, one for dish and one for OTA at each TV.

    I have been very happy with Dish which is why I have not switched. But they now seem much more stingy with equipment and service fees than in the past which is my main reason for switching. I have a 722 which constantly loses connection (requires several reboots to get connection back) while my 622 has no trouble at the same time. So it is the equipment. Even connected the 622 up to TV with the 722 to make sure. Dish wants to charge a fee to fix the problem. Between this and the raising of service costs I've started looking into switching. Seems like the only way to get new equipment and keep costs down is to switch every two years.

    I REALLY appreciate everyone's help as I want to be as informed as possible before making a switch as I will be locked in for two years...
     
  8. CCarncross

    CCarncross Hall Of Fame

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    Excellent point. This actually makes a lot of sense. Having said that, I don't see it flying with the masses that post here everyday....:lol:

    It'll still be post after post of "If I don't get a brand new unit I'm going postal" remarks...
     
  9. TDK1044

    TDK1044 Godfather

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    Your point is well taken, I would make one point though. I recently wanted to add an HD DVR to my whole home network. I would happily have done this directly through Directv if they could have guaranteed me either an older model DVR with a DECA adapter, or an HR24 which has an on board DECA.

    Directv customer service couldn't guarantee me either option, and the CSR said that I could always order the DECA adapter separately if an older model DVR arrived.

    I wasn't about to order a mystery DVR and then possibly have to order a DECA adapter and wait a few more days for it to arrive, so I went to Solid Digital and ordered an HR 24 which arrived two days later. :)
     
  10. cypherx

    cypherx Hall Of Fame

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    I originally wanted Dish Network, but in my area for all of the HD, I needed an Eastern Arc Setup. That points in the 72,77 degree range, and trees blocked that view. The installer looked all around and we determined he had to cancel the order for no line of sight. The reason I wanted Dish, was to try the new Sling DVR, and also I like their HD channel selection better. My HDTV is a 720p plasma, so concerns about HD-Lite did not bother me (my TV is 1024x768, rectangular pixel). We settled for DirecTV because we could not get dish. I am disappointed in the channel lineup (I could care less about sports that are not local teams), but I hope that some day they will fix this issue. Problem is, it looks like a lot of their bandwidth is wasted for PPV's and some push VOD delivery service. I have high speed internet connected to my DirecTV system, and I can get all the PPV and VOD through the web connection.

    The VOD system on DirecTV is MUCH BETTER than Dish Network. From all of the programming choices, to the branded channel screens and search functionality. Also an internet connected receiver can search for YouTube videos and display them right on the TV. I just think the DirecTV software looks more polished than Dish Network, even though it is a little slow moving around compared to Dish.

    Word is that DirecTV is working on a new HD interface for their receivers. This means updated graphics for this generation. I'm excited about that, and it's one of the reasons why I don't break out of my contract and go with cable (which has more HD that I want to watch). Also, the HD channels are on the same numbers as SD, and you can completely hide SD duplicates in one simple selection option (which is default now). I was at my moms house (who has Dish Network), and it seemed like I had to create a "favorites" list manually to show only the HD channels + channels that are only offered in SD. Otherwise it was ALL HD (but then you loose all the SD channels), or ALL SD, or Everything (and you see duplicates of HD and SD channels next to each other, wasting guide space).

    Don't even get me started on Cable... they bury their HD channels so far up the dial so your wife and kids never find them!
     
  11. grassfeeder

    grassfeeder AllStar

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    and........I got my HR-24 as the HD-DVR........a refurb, but none-the-less.
     
  12. Jodean

    Jodean Icon

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    Guys my post was not one sided. I cant help some of you dont know both systems in detail.

    I legitimately listed what i know of advantages of each service.

    And merg for one should know what hes talking about but i guess not. He already stated that you could pause live tv on 2 tvs, which you cant with directv unless you BUY another dvr.

    I got 2 free dvrs when i signed up with dish. I added 2 more dvrs after 3 months at no cost, this would have cost me at least $400 with directv, not to mention the 2nd DVR at $99 at startup cost.

    I Have a 722, 722k, 612, 512 4 dvrs control 6 tvs, total of 8 tuners all for free.

    Im just stating what i know.
    Directvs MRV would be great if it fed all 4 tvs for the 4 free HD receivers we install, but no they messed it all up and only can feed one other reciever, have alot of customers mad about that.

    When some people see the big kaku dish, they dont even want it on the house. It is alot heavier than the dish 1000 and does require the braces and more lags in your house. No way around that the dish 1000 is far better in that respect.

    And direct does not have more HD channels, not right now anyway. You cant count sunday ticket HD channels and other sports packs HD like the 30 fox sports channels. Even if you did you have to pay about $400 to get all those stations and most of them are part time/part seasonal channels.

    Oh, surprised you dont list more directv features though, there has to be some.

    And i really dont get the ethernet over power line question........its built into the dish reciever, no cable needed to get to a deca unit. Most homes i cant do a deca install at because they dont want another cable ran wrapped around the house just for VOD and they dont want to pay for wall fishing either. Terrible way to get internet to the swm system. I guess if you want to be an ass you can say its not wireless, but its not using any coax cable and works anywhere, you HAVE to have an outlet at your tv no way around that!

    But thanks again merg for the rebuttle that doesnt make any sense. Not one thing you have in red is the correct response, even the 2nd tv live pause with the free equipment provided, not sure how you can explain yourself on that one......


    LOL, ya the larger heavier dish isnt an advantage......you just GAIN a huge dish that requires more bracing and larger structure, also the extra lags in your roof arnt an advantage yet you still GAIN them. Both of these are dis advantages.
     
  13. sigma1914

    sigma1914 Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Neither do you as seen by your classic posts.
     
  14. Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 Active Member

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    Really? You're going to criticize someone for not making sense? Ramble on...
     
  15. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    This makes it sound like if you have one DVR and three regular receivers that only one of those receivers can use MRV at all. The actual limitation is that one DVR can only feed one receiver at a time. It may sound like semantics, but it is an important distinction.

    I'm not sure "a lot" of customers are mad about it, trying to watch two different things from two remote receivers at the same time.
     
  16. Jodean

    Jodean Icon

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    They actually are. They are told they can watch a dvr recording in any of the 4 rooms, the free system includes one hd dvr and 3 hd receivers.

    When i tell them that only one HD box can be streamed from the dvr, they are unhappy at that point in time. Most of our 4 room installs have 4 or more people using the system. And if they had dish with 4 room dvr already, it makes it even worse. On dish you can watch 4 different dvr programs on 4 tvs, and this is from the free equipment provided.
     
  17. Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 Active Member

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    How many qualify as a lot?
     
  18. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Comments in-line in red...

    - Merg
     
  19. Jodean

    Jodean Icon

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    OK, wow

    again merg...

    If you seriously think your response on pausing two live tvs by connecting them both to the same tuner is valid....well....ok whatever, i guess you can also then pause 10 tvs if they are all connected to the same tuner....wow....not even close man!!

    I have run into about 1 in 10 homes that DONT require another coax cable run for the broadband deca. Most cable modems are in an office with the only RG6 cable in that room being used by the cable modem. Very few modems are mounted by the service connections, which when they are ya its super easy and all is well, but that just rarely happens. So most people cant get the cin+ kit. I was simply stating that dish uses a better non rg6 cable solution that will worki in ANY room and works well, not sure where this power line connection you speak of doesnt work.....moral of story it works bettter than directvs internet connection method.

    I do like your statement that the "only" time a new coax has to be run is IF......well too bad that 9 out of 10 homes fall into the "if" part.

    Again you can list some advantages of directv, I couldnt think of any more. Its not my fault dish has more features.

    Lets see, directv has auto program of remote without any codes which is nice but not really an everyday feature.

    Only one line from the dish if using swm
     
  20. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Guess it's time to give another class on technology.
    Most/all homes have "220" voltage, which is two "110" legs out of phase. These only connect at the transformer on the pole.
    Powerline adapters don't work well over house wiring because it wasn't made/designed for high frequency, thus there is a lot of loss. The shorter the runs between adapters the better they work.
    So if two are connected to the same circuit the shorter the run.
    Next would be connected to two different circuits, but on the same leg from the transformer. The signal needs to travel from one adapter to the power panel, across to the other circuit, and back to the other adapter. Depending on this distance, they may or may not work.
    Finally, there is when one adapter is on one leg of the transformer and the other is on the other leg. The signal needs to travel from the adapter to the transformer [on the pole] and back to the other adapter. This as "I hope you can see" is a much longer path that degrades the signal the most.
     

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