1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Texas honor student jailed for missing too much school

Discussion in 'The OT' started by fluffybear, May 29, 2012.

  1. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,566
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    Glad they didn't have that policy when I was in school, because I missed A LOT.

    My Mom and I had an agreement that as long as I did well, she'd excuse any absences.

    I missed 1-2 days per week my senior year.
     
  2. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    I thought I recall Stanford had a restriction on admitting anyone with a criminal record. If it is the case, She'll probably have to look down the road at the tree hugger university (Cal-Berkley)
     
  3. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,611
    382
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    In cases like this I always wonder:

    1. What is the lesson?
    2. Who is supposed to be learning the lesson?

    You have a girl arguably raising her own siblings, working, and being an honor student while missing some classes... I'm inclined to give an award to such a student... not put her in jail.

    If you are a screw-up... imagine the lesson you learn... better to just drop out than try... don't try to be responsible to your family... don't try to better yourself... just give up because you're going to jail anyway.
     
  4. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,364
    580
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    She's not been tried, convicted and sentenced, has she? (Dragnet)
     
  5. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,335
    501
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    When I was in High School, I had a teacher report me because she thought I was faking strep, she found it suspicious someone had the same note. Fortunately things didn't escalate after my biology teacher offered her a lesson in infectious disease. I can't imagine having to spend time in jail. But I do think she took on too much. But doesn't sound like she had much choice.
     
  6. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

    9,139
    28
    Sep 16, 2006
    Would not a juvie record be non-public or expunged upon turning 18? Or does Texas string up their juvies too?
     
  7. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,566
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    We fry em.
     
  8. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

    9,139
    28
    Sep 16, 2006
    I know...the smell wafts up this way...couldnt you guys go back to pistols against a concrete wall.
     
  9. spartanstew

    spartanstew Dry as a bone

    12,566
    61
    Nov 16, 2005
    Wylie, Texas
    Too many ricochets.
     
  10. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

    21,611
    382
    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    Stupid must be contagious... Strangely enough I had EXACTLY the same experience some 30+ years ago myself. I actually had the fun of strep 2 out of three years at one point... The second time I had it, I missed a week of school and when I returned I found out that the teacher had been talking to other students about me "faking" being sick.. even though I still had the scarlet fever rash AND had to get a doctor's note to excuse me from P.E. for the next week as even though I was no longer contagious I was not supposed to exert myself and was still on medication.

    Even with all that, the teacher still thought I had been faking it. My young mind never understood that. My adult mind is still confused!

    Well... if you have a sealed record, that's evidence of something... a person without any record has nothing... so seeing a "sealed juvenile record" would raise flags... and then there's cases where those "sealed" records haven't stayed sealed... so it's one of those things where you really don't want to have to deal with the possibilities if you don't have to.
     
  11. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

    16,335
    501
    May 30, 2007
    Cincinnati
    Yeah, in my case being able to fake a throat culture would be quite a trick. My mother wouldn't even leave the room to try the lamp trick with a thermometer.
     
  12. runner861

    runner861 Icon

    859
    0
    Mar 20, 2010


    [Update from Fox News:

    Quote:
    Diane Tran, an 11th-grade honor student at Willis High School near Houston, was sent to jail for 24 hours last Wednesday by Judge Lanny Moriarty and ordered to pay a $100 fine for excessive truancy.
    Barnett, who is not defending Tran, said the girl likely spent her 24-hour jail sentence at Montgomery County Jail surrounded by suspected murderers, drug addicts and prostitutes.

    "It's hard-core," he said of the jail, noting that past clients whom he has defended described it as "the worst experience of their life." "

    Quote:
    "Tran, who is considered an adult under Texas state law, was issued a summons last Wednesday for truancy after she missed classes. She was arrested in open court and ordered to spend 24 hours at the jail for truancy, which is considered a misdemeanor.
    E. Tay Bond, a well-known Houston defense attorney, said the judge likely had no discretion to avert a jail sentence.
    "There's no legal exception that I’m aware of that if you're an honors student, you’re allowed to exceed a maximum number of unexcused days under the Texas Compulsory Education Laws," Bond told FoxNews.com. "Twenty-four hours would be about the minimum period of confinement to make a point.
    "I think the public policy of making kids attend school is necessary and 24 hours in jail would be pretty minimal and should get the point across," he said.]

    I think that this report actually just makes the whole situation murkier. We really don't know what happened here. There is an assertion that she was sent to jail for 24 hours on Wednesday, yet I saw a report on the internet on KHOU saying that she had not gone into custody and the judge was discussing the possibility that she might not go into custody.

    Then we have a criminal defense attorney not involved in the case speculating that she spent time in some hardcore lockup, yet he appears to have no real knowledge of the case.

    Then there is an assertion that she was issued a summons last Wednesday and arrested in open court. Which was it? A summons is a ticket or a citation, ordering a person to appear in court on a future date. Or was she arrested? Did she plead guilty at arraignment? Was there even an arraignment held? Was a trial held? Who represented her? She is entitled to an attorney. Or did she choose to represent herself?

    Fox asserts that she is considered an adult under Texas state law. Perhaps, but I don't see any citation to any code. I don't even see a citation to the truancy code everyone says she violated.

    We're nowhere near the truth here.
     
  13. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
  14. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    I would have thought so as well but according to a number of articles I have found on the subject, Texas considers 17 year olds to be adults.

    KHOU has added a few more interesting details:

     
  15. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,789
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    When a yearbook photo of her wearing a "hoodie" shows up on the net, then I expect public discourse to change.
     
  16. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,789
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    I'm scarcely following this story because it is clear to me that those news agencies with the resources to report it more fully have a vested interest in not doing so. As long as this story has legs, it gives them something to displace coverage of the Romney/Obama photo-ops of the day.
     
  17. runner861

    runner861 Icon

    859
    0
    Mar 20, 2010
    That is it exactly. We are getting snippets to sensationalize the story and build ratings. Some of these news organizations never let the truth get in the way of a good story. In addition to a desire to build ratings and sensationalize, there my be a lack of understanding of the law and courts by the reporters and editors involved. I sense there is some of both.
     
  18. dmspen

    dmspen Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    1,651
    42
    Dec 1, 2006
    Los Gatos,...
    Next thing you know they'll be pulling kids who have serious illnesses out of the hospital and arresting them for truancy!

    No joy for me missing school. My Dad was a teacher in the same school!
     
  19. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

    7,316
    38
    Jun 19, 2004
    Peachtree...
    My parents were not teachers but in Junior High (Middle School in some areas) the dean's wife was best friend's with my mom. Worst of it was he had no problem talking about school and grades during our family get-togethers.
     
  20. AntAltMike

    AntAltMike Hall Of Fame

    3,789
    108
    Nov 20, 2004
    College...
    I skipped school only once. I had to write two term papers, so instead of going to school, I hitch-hiked six miles to the library at the nearby state university and spent the day working on those two papers.

    Incredibly two of my five teachers saw me. One had driven by me that morning when I was hitch hiking, but she didn't pick up hitch hikers. The other saw me after I returned. I was standing at a crosswalk, waiting for the light to change, and I see an arm sticking out the window of a Ford Galaxy, pointing at me. The arm was that of my physics teacher.

    I knew in advance of my English class that my English teacher had spotted me because she had already told the class that day. She said to them that she hadn't reported me to the office and didn't know whether she would or not, so I wasn't caught off guard when she asked me why I had skipped school and I told her it was to work on her term paper. She said it better be good, and it was. I fact, it was so good that she actually checked with other teachers in the school to see if it was something I was recycling from another class because she knew I didn't really care about English, in which my three term grades to that point had been C, D, D.

    She never did report me, and gave me an A on that paper and a B for the term, which didn't make any sense to me because that term paper was the only thing we did that term, so I didn't see how my term grade could be any different than that paper's grade. But anyway...

    The physics teacher fined me twenty five cents for skipping school. The fines in that class were a running gag, like the Kangaroo Court fines in major league baseball, and the money they raised was to be used to buy something for the class.

    A few weeks later, our school had a crackdown on fake hall passes. The principal announced over the intercom that by prior arrangement, there were no valid hall passes in effect at that moment, so therefore anyone in the hallway was not authorized to be there and was to be sent to the office.

    I was in physics class when that announcement was made, and a friend of mine named Ralph had been snared. As Ralph walked by our room door, he did a pantomime of holding onto two bars of a jail cell and we all cracked up, and the teacher shook his head, and said, "You just knew that if someone was going to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, it would be Ralph." We all laughed some more because Ralph was one of the most popular kids in the school, a class officer who had the favor of all the teachers in spite of his irresponsible behavior.

    A few weeks later, we had a "skip day", and Ralph was in the wrong place at the wrong time again. He was in the middle of the front seat of the car he was joy riding in and he died in a car crash. I guess the only tie-in I can make between this diatribe and the opening post is that there are worse places to be than in a jail cell when you skip school.
     

Share This Page