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The iPad Thread

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by Chris Blount, Jan 25, 2010.

How much will the Apple tablet cost?

  1. $199

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. $299

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. $399

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. $499

    5 vote(s)
    10.6%
  5. $599

    5 vote(s)
    10.6%
  6. $699

    6 vote(s)
    12.8%
  7. $799

    15 vote(s)
    31.9%
  8. $899

    10 vote(s)
    21.3%
  9. $999

    6 vote(s)
    12.8%
  1. Jul 6, 2010 #421 of 467
    Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    Lower...
    Agree. People who need full-fledged keyboards won't be using these.

    I see the surge in sales coming from purchasers who want a 2nd or 3d computing appliance in the home, for less sophisticated computer users/family members who only want to browse the web and read e-mails. I also assume these will come with built-in webcams that will allow grandparents to easily see their grandchildren. And then there's the whole university market.

    With Apple predicted to sell 2 million of these a month by the end of the year, I can see at least that many "clones" being sold as well, similar to how Droid phones outsold iPhones Q1 of this year.
     
  2. Jul 6, 2010 #422 of 467
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I still think people are looking at the iPad wrong... expecting it to be a "notebook killer".

    I see the iPad more as being a potential replacement for:

    1. Actual books
    2. Actual pads of paper (note pads)

    And similar things like that... People can carry around their entire library of books similar to their iPod for music... and many books will actually be in "actual" size on the iPad even.

    I've made the argument that the iPad might be a great thing to introduce into the public schools as a replacement for textbooks. Instead of buying new textbooks for all the kids every few years when they wear out... but iPads and then use e-textbooks.

    The cost would come WAY down on iPads if something like this were to happen... and while the initial buy-in for a school would be expensive, they wouldn't have to re-buy an iPad for several years and could always have up-to-date textbooks.

    The door then also opens to having the iPad used for in-class educational movies as well.. and you could even (with headphones) have groups in the same class watching different levels of instructional videos.

    The iPad also has the advantage of being much easier to "cripple" to use in a school environment than a notebook computer and keep the non-educational games and Web sites restricted access.
     
  3. Jul 7, 2010 #423 of 467
    dennisj00

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    I agree that books, magazines, and education in general will see a tremendous change once the publishers get their content ready. I already read my local daily paper via PDF with no special app (it's coming), but I can open the e-edition on my laptop or desktop (it's flash), download the PDF for off-line reading, and transfer it to the iPad quicker than I can retrieve the paper from the street.

    I can't imagine the advantage of the hundreds of textbooks (some huge), reference books, technical magazines and calculators (mine was a slide rule) that I had to lug around during my four years of engineering degree all fitting on the iPad.

    But I really think the explosion in sales will come when the custom apps hit the field and every doctor, technician, sales rep, etc. will be using an iPad.

    (posted from my iPad)
     
  4. Jul 7, 2010 #424 of 467
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    The electronic books issue is most interesting...

    My wife is a book-a-holic prolific reader of hard cover novels.

    Because of that, I am regularly and repeatedly accompanying her as the book inventory "pack-mule" for numerous author book signings. Almost all of these authors are NY Times best sellers.

    The reason I mention all this is that these 15-20 authors (and in turn their publishers) seem to have a united and different view of electronic books.

    Their consensus uniform perspective that these major best-selling authors and their major publishers all convey in their presentations attended in 2010 indicate that "electronic books will never be more than a 15% market share niche market". In addition, they have virtually unanimously publicly stated" there will be a market for this format to be sure, but publishers do not see anything more than a limited niche market for books well into the next decade." Not one of them owned a Kindle or iPad.

    No doubt some users will find eBooks enticing and a preference. My point is that I do not see it as a driving force to gain iPad adoption. If its a key need, the sub $150 Kindle is far more attractive for this hot button.

    Where I see a great potential for the iPad is applications that leverage the device-specific attributes of the iPad itself. That is what grew the iPhone, and likely what will advance the iPad. What does the iPad do that other devices don't? Applications written to respond to that question will trigger iPad adoption in the greatest numbers.

    The iPad is neat indeed, and appears well constructed.

    The WIN7-based devices are quickly approaching for their release.

    How all this plays out in the next 12 months should also be interesting.
     
  5. Jul 7, 2010 #425 of 467
    phrelin

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    Having already become an avid iPad Kindle-App book reader, I can tell you that most of the NYT best seller publishers' stuff is already available through Amazon. Some observations:
    • It is not taking me longer to read a book on the iPad, contrary to a recent news article.
    • Publishers and authors take note: I buy more books more frequently because I have the iPad with the Kindle App; I currently have nine books on the iPad, am reading one, and have three more to read.
    • Right now, Apple's iBook offering is comparatively sparse and more difficult to navigate than Amazon.
    Yes there are several other readers out there including the Kindle. We started out with a Sony Reader when it first came out, but it just didn't work for us.

    As near as I can tell, the Kindle DX is the only dedicated reader with a "page" comparable in size to the iPad. Out of principle I won't consider a Kindle because I would have to pay for hardware for Sprint, the only big name in the cell world I'd have to drive 50 miles to get access to because Sprint cherry-picked the urban areas in the beginning saying "to h*ll with you the rest of America, you don't deserve access."

    As serious Amazon customers, we wrote them about this when the Kindle came out. They responded by pointing out one can use wifi. I responded by saying take the Sprint related hardware out, cut the price $20, and we're in. No response to that.

    Finally, I can't think of a single reason one would buy a dedicated reader over the iPad except for price (the price on the DX has dropped to $379, the wifi only version of the iPad starts at $499) or unless one really isn't technology oriented.

    The fact that I can be reading outside under the redwoods, stop reading, check DBSTalk postings and my email, browse news on the web, check stock prices and potentially buy or sell through Scottrade, then go back to reading without getting up or putting down my iPad is a very real advantage over a Kindle DX.

    I'm still waiting for the "coming soon" Sling App for the iPad to watch TV though I could use the iPhone version.

    Finally, if I want to run a Win 7 application while away from my home computer, I'll use my laptop.

    While I respect the need for a heavy duty OS on a keyboard-and-mouse-equipped computer for certain uses, I see the iPhone OS and Android as the 21st Century competitors in the OS business once dominated by Microsoft.
     
  6. Jul 7, 2010 #426 of 467
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Available and adoption are 2 entirely different things.

    I can still get eBooks for popular titles for Windows Mobile v5, yet almost no one will purchase those since that operating software is no longer supported.

    The point was the adoption rate, not if it will be adopted.

    The experts in the publishing world, as well as the authors themselves, are quite unified in their views that 15% or so will be the peak adoption rate for eBooks using the iPad , Kindle, or any other medium available at this time.
     
  7. Jul 7, 2010 #427 of 467
    phrelin

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    IMHO they have their heads in the sand.

    Look, I'm an old guy and tend to be an early adopter. But our local book store just closed. Our used book store doesn't really need 10 more copies of a 2005 NYT best seller.

    I cannot imagine that in 2020 my granddaughters and their peers who are already glued to their smart phones - they who watch TV on those phones and their computers - will prefer to clutter their rooms and ultimately their homes with "pop books" as we have.

    College textbooks in ebook form are already out there even as relatively inexpensive "rentals." If they experience that, I doubt they will go back to buying paperback "pop books" or even hard bound ones.

    Nor can I imagine they will be buying a lot of unsearchable paper reference books.

    And many old books that qualify as "great literature" are available in ebook form for free.

    I look at my house and imagine how it would be if I didn't have walls with shelves full of either all my VHS tapes or all my books. While neither are useless I think both are equally out-of-date.
     
  8. Jul 7, 2010 #428 of 467
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    That's always a possibility.

    Then again, I would have thought the HDTV adoption rate would have been near 100% by now after all these years and the mandated death of analog signals...there's a way to go on that.

    The 15% adoption rate may/many not be conservative....but I suspect the niche label will still fit (at least until it surpasses 50%). I don't see that happening.
     
  9. Jul 7, 2010 #429 of 467
    phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    In my oldest granddaughter's home, her mom and significant other just finally bought an HDTV. My granddaughter, on the other hand, has been watching streaming TV. In my younger granddaughter's home, they don't have any TV service (not even OTA), but rather watch streaming TV and BD.

    I've never said this on this forum before, but the time may come when a whole generation will be wondering why anyone watched something called a "TV" and will be puzzling why I thought it was something important.;)
     
  10. Jul 7, 2010 #430 of 467
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Blasphemy !rolling

    We now return you to your regularly scheduled iPad discussion network...
     
  11. Jul 7, 2010 #431 of 467
    Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    In the future there will be no TVs, no computers, no phones, no faxes... just appliances of various sizes that deliver communication, information, productivity and entertainment. They will all work the same but the display sizes will differ.
     
  12. Jul 7, 2010 #432 of 467
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Vulcan Mind Meld will subplant that... ;)

    Please don't tell me there's an app for that...
     
  13. Jul 7, 2010 #433 of 467
    dennisj00

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    I too think the publishers and some writers have their heads in the sand. Asking them about the coming impact of e-readers and getting a 15% figure is like asking the music industry in 2000 about the impact of downloading individual songs from sites like iTunes.

    The publishers have their manufacturing infrastructure to support and their existing history / projections of profit margins from hard copy books. Their crystal balls are still cloudy on e-editions and they're not ready to give up the hard copy.

    Another current difference in the iPad - color. Pages also are no longer limited to illustrations or pictures. True multimedia video / audio can be included without the dvd in the pouch.

    Like Phrelin, today with the iPad, I've read the local paper, read the USA Today / NYT headline articles, checked the weather from several sources including my personal weather station, checked the stock market, the Astronomy picture of the day, watched a Ken Burns documentary on Netflix (our TVs are inaccessible today from some redecorating), read a couple chapters of 'A Salty Piece of Land', browsed DBSTalk and several other sites, checked a camera I have installed on a friends firetower, played a few games of HD Pinball, and listened to a couple hours of the local NPR station. (and shared it with my wife!) (and I did a few things on the iPhone, also!)

    Try that on any other e-reader!
     
  14. Jul 7, 2010 #434 of 467
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Guess I'm not as easily impressed....I could do much of that (and in some cases did do that) on my Ipaq PocketPC 8 years ago...granted it was slower...but I could do it.

    That said...the iPad graphic presentation and screen resolution are quite impressive, and certainly strong candidates for all sorts of new or improved applications. The units themselves also seem to be well constructed.
     
  15. Jul 7, 2010 #435 of 467
    dennisj00

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    Fixed your post. Granted, I did SOME of these on a Pocket PC a few years ago (mostly played solitare) and I did MOST of these on my iPhone before the iPad.

    But you can only do ONE of these on most eReaders! (read a book)

    And yes, I can do all of these on my laptop . . .well, not some of them because of the 'Apps'. But my laptop can't go for days on a charge and is also quite warm on my lap.
     
  16. Jul 7, 2010 #436 of 467
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks...fixed the post too.

    I see alot of upside in the iPad, and am generally impressed with how its put together, presents content on its screen, etc.

    Where I think they missed the boat is true multitasking. That leaves open the door for a WIN7-based devices to compete IMHO. We'll see how things go as the new HP and other tablet units start to emerge and emphasize their strengths in comparison. I do know that they can't compete all that well with Apple's marketing savvy. ;)
     
  17. Jul 7, 2010 #437 of 467
    dennisj00

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    If ALL of the windows tablet manufacturers got together to build their devices to use the same 'apps' / books and create a common 'store' to make it as easy to download 'apps' / tunes / books, there might be a chance.

    But that's what fragmented the PocketPC market.

    In addition to it not happening, I'm afraid they're several years behind.
     
  18. Jul 7, 2010 #438 of 467
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Its closer than you think.

    I had this one in my hands to play with at CES back in January...

    http://gizmodo.com/5442200/hps-windows-7-slate-device-revealed-by-steve-ballmer

    http://www.electronista.com/articles/10/06/21/toshiba.resurrects.libretto.with.w100.tablet/

    There are more out there...

    But of course....can those compete with iPad?

    That is TBD.
     
  19. Jul 7, 2010 #439 of 467
    dshu82

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    This is exactly how I envisioned using one. My wife and I both have iPhone 3GS and my wife usually has that out and her work laptop in the living room. I use my iPhone outside the house, rarely on the wireless, so the iPad's size and portability are what intrigues me.
     
  20. Jul 7, 2010 #440 of 467
    dennisj00

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    Don't get me wrong, i'm very interested in the windows devices. But check back when they are selling +1 Million a month. Look at the Zune, never touched one, but I understand it's a great device. It just takes more than releasing great hardware.

    (posted from my iPad)
     

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