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The new Budweiser ads

Discussion in 'The OT' started by phrelin, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Even though it's now owned by the Brazilian-Belgian brewing company InBev, Budweiser is breaking a new "nostalgic" ad campaign this weekend "trying to capture feelings like camaraderie and the idea that, in America, anything is possible". Go to this Advertising Age article and check out the ads.

    They seemed on the mark to me.
     
  2. dodge boy

    dodge boy R.I.P. Chris Henry

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    Eh I prefer Molsons....... Much better beer IMO.
     
  3. Go Beavs

    Go Beavs Hall Of Fame

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    I like the ad, but I prefer Coors.
     
  4. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

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    Bud, Molson, and Coors are all swill. Try a real beer. Craft brewers in the US are producing some of the best beers in the world right now, and there are almost certainly several in your state, no matter where you live. Don't listen to the ads. Follow your taste buds.
     
  5. dodge boy

    dodge boy R.I.P. Chris Henry

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    Molson Canadian is a real beer sorry no Skunky American Bathtub beer here.... :lol:
     
  6. 4HiMarks

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    Molson and Coors are both made by the same Canadian company. Budweiser is owned by a Brazilian/Belgian conglomerate. Heineken is usually skunky by the time it gets over here. Nationality has no effect on whether a beer is swill or not. Spending more on advertising than ingredients=swill no matter where it's ostensibly "made".

    I'll take a Dogfish Head 60 or 90 Minute IPA or a Stone Arrogant Bastard over anything made by Molson-Coors any time (including their Blue Moon "micro" brews).
     
  7. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

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    Check out their Brewing Process at http://www.molsoncoorscanada.com/en/MolsonHeritage/QualityBrewing/BrewingProcess.aspx

    They add corn syrup to their beer. A-B uses rice, but the net effect is the same - Swill!

    Corn, rice and similar adjuncts are added because they are cheaper than malted barley. The yeast doesn't care where the sugar it ferments comes from, but such adjuncts are almost pure sugar and don't add anything to the taste of the beer. They just boost the alcohol content, which is then diluted with water to further lower costs and keep their customers from getting too drunk.

    "Real beer" brewers don't use adjuncts. In fact, they will add "specialty grains" which might not ferment at all, but add fullness, body, and mouthfeel to the finished product. Of course, they also add to the cost.
     
  8. Go Beavs

    Go Beavs Hall Of Fame

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    I enjoy a "real" beer too. I really enjoy Widmer's 'Broken Halo'.

    Sometimes though, I just want something real cold, that doesn't cost a ton, that I can drink all afternoon. And that is Coors.
     
  9. Upstream

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    You've been brainwashed by proponents of the Bavarian Beer Purity Laws.

    Recipes for non-German beers have used grains other than malted barley for hundreds of years. And the prices of those grains fluctuate over time. Bud doesn't change their recipe when rice prices rise or when barley prices drop.

    The use of rice in Bud is not based on cost; rice provides a different flavor. You might not like the crisp flavor that rice imparts, but at least recognize that the flavor is the purpose of using rice.


    By the way, the Bavarian Beer Purity Laws are probably the worst thing to ever happen to the German beer industry. The laws have eliminated unique German beers like most wheat beers and fruit beers. The inability to sell non-compliant beer in Germany also killed a lot of craft brewers in surrounding European countries.

    However it has been great for American craft breweries, who have ressurected old European recipes (as well as creating new American recipies). That is why American craft brewers now make the best beers in the world.
     
  10. 4HiMarks

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    Ever been to Germany? There are plenty of German beers that do not adhere to the Reinheitsgebot (especially considering it has been repealed). I, myself, enjoy a nice, crisp Hefeweizen often, many of which are imported from Germany. The Belgian craft beer scene is doing well, too. They use all kinds of non-Reinheitsgebot ingredients. Do you know what is in a Witt, for example?

    Do you brew your own beer? Ever tried using rice or corn? I brew with a variety of ingredients, as do fellow members of my homebrew club. Several of them have won national awards for their beers, and corn or rice hardly contribute any flavor, unlike wheat, honey, coriander, bitter orange, oats, rye, and many other ingredients beside barley malt. This is why Bud and other "American lager" beers taste so watery.
     
  11. scooper

    scooper Hall Of Fame

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    Yes I have brewed my own - and it beats the heck out of most American "large brewers" for taste, mouth feel, etc. I have some Honey Porter that would knock your socks off :D .
     
  12. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

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    Yum. I like honey porter. One of my fellow club members keeps bees, and brews that almost exclusively.

    I currently have a vanilla porter on tap, plus a killer chocolate raspberry stout in bottles. Then there are two slightly different ESBs fermenting (long story). I had a high-gravity Kolsch that just kicked a couple of days ago, but I need to wait a little longer on the ESBs (they were just brewed on Columbus Day).
     
  13. bobukcat

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    I think a lot of people, including me, agree with this statement but may insert a different "real" and American beer in those spots. I like a lot of different "real" beer but don't tend to like IPAs if they are too hoppy. A nice Dunkel is good but after a couple liters you are FULL!
     
  14. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    I gather from the discussion here that the commercials which were the subject of this thread may or may not bring a smile but definitely won't change anyone's beer choices.:grin:
     

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