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The official Mac vs PC thread

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by Chris Blount, May 4, 2012.

  1. May 9, 2012 #101 of 127
    heathramos

    heathramos Legend

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    I'm sure you can create and edit Office documents but is it 100% compatible?

    I know OpenOffice on Ubuntu warns about macros when creating files in MS formats.
     
  2. May 9, 2012 #102 of 127
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    "Nothing is 100% compatible".....! :hurah: And in this case, probably more than just Macros. But then there're lots among the various versions of at least .doc in the MS world.
     
  3. May 9, 2012 #103 of 127
    braven

    braven Hall Of Fame

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    ... and I'm pretty sure it's illegal. :rolleyes:
     
  4. May 9, 2012 #104 of 127
    harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    To take your argument one step further, it isn't about what operating systems you can boot but rather what applications that will run.

    To put a sharp point on one aspect of the question, can one reliably run DIRECTV2PC on a typical Mac?

    I used to consult for a graphic design company that ran Macintosh software (68K based) on Commodore Amiga computers with emulation software and hardware (needed primarily to handle those screwy multi-speed Macintosh floppy discs). Everything seemed to work.

    The incidence of solutions that demand a Mac seem pretty few and far between.

    From a personal computing standpoint, both platforms are pretty hopelessly bloated with overwrought security and backwards compatibility but on Windows, that actually buys you something in terms of practical applications you might want to run.
     
  5. May 9, 2012 #105 of 127
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    As reliably as you can run it! :hurah:

    That old thing is being superseded by iOS and Android apps, and I do get your point that there are specialty apps that run only on PCs. Not a biggie for many reasons.
     
  6. May 9, 2012 #106 of 127
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    Is it illegal, or just against the TOS?
     
  7. May 9, 2012 #107 of 127
    lparsons21

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    I can and have run Direct2PC on my Mac and it works about as good as it does on my W7 laptop, and that is not really all that good. Direct2PC isn't a good piece of software to try to make a point with, imo.

    And yes, there are not as many reasons from an application standpoint to pick Mac over Windows. But there are plenty of good reasons to pick a Mac anyway. Solid built, reliable, stable. Other than a software update of a rare type, I haven't rebooted my 27" iMac since I bought it. Well, I did have to when the HD died. That certainly isn't the case for a Windows box if you like to keep the performance up.

    And there are plenty of practical applications for the Mac too you know. It isn't like some times in the past when there were gaping holes in software coverage. But then since virtualization works so well, I can (and sometimes do) run both W7 and Linux on my Mac.

    From a personal computer standpoint, both OSX and Windows 7 have a lot to offer. And on the desktop, they are the only 2 OS's with any real marketshare.
     
  8. May 9, 2012 #108 of 127
    lparsons21

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    Against TOS. So it is a civil matter, not a criminal one. And I think it is one that hasn't been tested in court yet.
     
  9. May 9, 2012 #109 of 127
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Exactly... Office isn't even always compatible with itself!
     
  10. heathramos

    heathramos Legend

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    true...especially with Access but even pivot tables in Excel had some significant changes between versions.

    Of course in a business environment, you can standardize to one version of Office and not worry about it. The issue will come when people are working offsite using a different OS or onsite using a non-standard desktop. For the home user, you could either force people to use standardized laptops or run virtual machines if compatibility is a concern.

    It would be nice if Microsoft could make versions of Office that could work on every OS in mixed environments so we could eliminate that as a concern.

    Of course in my case, I would like things like IE and silverlight/moonlight to work on other OSs as well.

    somewhat off topic, though, since OS choices from a personal standpoint is different than a corporate one.

    I still think it is mostly an application driven choice as well as personal preference, kind of like choosing between an Xbox and PS3.
     
  11. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    It is a biggie if you're looking for stuff like home automation or are into amateur radio, model railroading, RC models or some of the other deep pockets hobbies. In many of those uses, Linux may be a better choice than either OSX or Windows.

    Surely a lot of people aren't really using the computer as more than a simple Internet appliance, but I'm not convinced that those people need much more than a smart TV or a media player with web browsing capability.
     
  12. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    What would be even better if we all used applications that were designed around platform independence. If you consistently use less than 10% of what an application supports, you're wasting something.
     
  13. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    In the early Mac days... Desktop Publishing software on the Mac ran circles around similar software on the PC. Sometimes you couldn't even find an equivalent PC app... I'm talking 20+ years ago here.

    Apple (and Adobe) pioneered things like scalable fonts and the capability to generate a document on your computer that would paginate the same on another computer without someone having to tinker with it. The first Mac had a 72dpi screen and, though small, was standard across all Macs and was a good standard to develop to for consistency-sake.

    Word on the PC (and even on the Mac for that matter) was notorious in those days for paginating completely different from one computer to the next and making it a challenge to finish a document and deliver it to someone in a form that would look as you intended (and would print as you intended).

    In those same days, however, spreadsheets and games were almost impossible to find on the Mac but were abundant on the PC. It was a weird thing.

    I don't know when exactly it happened... but there was a crossover point where some people tried to develop games and other stuff for the Mac, and the Mac developers like Adobe began to port versions of their Desktop Publishing software over to the PC... the early endeavors were poor for BOTH platforms.

    But... the PC development continued, while the Mac development waned. Apple was notoriously difficult to work with in those days and believe it or not Microsoft was FAR more open about telling you what APIs they had for you to use... so it was easier to develop and get support for the PC, and a lot of programmers abandoned the Mac.

    Once the Desktop Publishing apps were up to snuff on the PC... even those people started migrating back to the PC from the Mac... and for a lot of other reasons the Mac began to lose ground for several years there.

    Now that Apple is having a heyday again... you can't beat Desktop Publishing on the Mac. You can equal it, though... but you can't beat it. You just can't. The only notable exception is that Adobe stopped developing FrameMaker for the Mac several versions ago and about 10 years ago... I guess the Mac wasn't "back" enough to support that program development... though Adobe continues to develop all of their other top-of-the-field Desktop Publishing tools for both Mac and PC.

    All that was meant to get me to this...

    For Desktop Publishing you can go either way... but I still recommend a Mac for ease of use and performance and compatibility.

    For just about everything else (primarily I'm talking programming, games, databases, etc.) you will generally find more and better software for the PC.

    That's just the way it is... though, with the success of gaming on the iPad and iPhone you are seeing the most games EVER for the Mac I think... so that may begin to turn a corner... and Apple does make a nice programming developer kit available for practically free and unlike the iPad/iPhone, you can develop programs for sale on a Mac without going through Apple or iTunes if you like (though you can as well)... so that is becoming a little easier on the Mac as well.
     
  14. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Winters,...
    Good retrospective!
     
  15. lparsons21

    lparsons21 Hall Of Fame

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    Well, that was a good retrospective, with only one error I could spot.

    And that was spreadsheets. Did you know that the first spreadsheet application was Visicalc and it was written for and ran on a Mac and Mac only back in the day?

    here's a link: http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa010199.htm
     
  16. dennisj00

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    Technically, it was the Apple II and was quickly released about a year later for the TRS-80 and Atari.
     
  17. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I didn't know that... but that was for the Apple II. Apple (if you go back before the Macintosh) actually innovated some more things... not just the personal computer BUT a personal computer that had expansion slots!

    But... for the purposes of this thread I was just discussing Mac vs PC... and ignoring all that came before those platforms.

    You inspired me to dig a little, though... and look what I found:

    http://epiac1216.wordpress.com/2009/04/25/the-early-days-of-spreadsheets/

    From that article:

    "Multiplan for the Apple Macinosh was Microsoft’s first GUI (Graphic User Interface) spreadsheet; it was also the most successful spreadsheet for the early Mac. Bill Gates was repeatedly heard in 1985 saying that Microsoft made more money on Multiplan for the Macintosh than any other platform. Multiplan for the Macintosh was in fact one of the few spreadsheets available for that platform."
     
  18. dmspen

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    Remember when Office updates came out for the MAC first?
     
  19. Brandon428

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    My first computer was an old Macintosh,don’t remember what the model was I think it was a II but I’m not sure. Then a friend of mine bought a PC and it had windows 95 on it. I was blown away and entranced at the incredibly easy user interface. I grew up with windows most of my childhood and my teen years.

    I was always anti Apple because I bought into the lie that Apple was over priced and didn’t have much support. So I finally decided to give Apple a chance. I bought an iPod video (30g) it cost a little over $300 but after playing with my sisters iPod I really wanted one.

    Then I met a friend who used to work for Apple,he was a big Apple fanboy and had the new Apple phone. I was just in aww of how well it worked. I immediately went and bought one. Unfortunately I was with Centennial and not AT&T so I had to buy mine outright for $600,but it was worth it!

    About a year after than I bought a Macbook and the rest is history. I’ve never gone back to PC and since my fist Macbook I’ve owned every kind of Macintosh computer besides the mini and Pro which I’m thinking about getting a Pro in the near future.

    My advice is give Apple a try. There isn’t a big learning curve,it’s not that expensive(I buy most of my stuff refurbished on www.apple.com) don’t buy into the lies. Everyone I have ever recommended a Mac to has thanked me even years later for introducing them to the Mac OS. In fact my best friend last night told me his Macbook Pro “15 was the best thing he’s ever bought. I feel sometimes that Apple should be paying me commission for all the Apple products I’ve sold! lol It’s not that I like selling stuff for Apple it’s just when someone asks me what the best computer,phone,etc. to buy is 99% of the time an Apple product. Their NOT perfect but it’s really as close as you can get.

    If you give it a chance you will not be disappointed and if yo can’t let Windows go just partition your drive and install Windows. You cannot go wrong with a Mac.
     
  20. Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    My first Apple product was the original iPod Nano. We were getting ready to go on a long trip and I bought it for my daughter who had just turned 6. I loaded some songs on it for her and the day before we were getting ready to leave I gave it to her. She immediately and without any instruction was able to pull up her songs and play them.

    My in-laws gave me a little grief for buying her the iPod when a $29 MP3 player would have been just fine for her. But the iPod allowed me to do something generic players didn't. I could set the top loudness so no matter how much she turned it up, it only got so loud. Well worth it to protect a young child's ears.
     

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