The Walt Disney Company and DISH Network Sign Groundbreaking Long-Term, Wide-Ranging Agreement

Discussion in 'General DISH™ Discussion' started by Stewart Vernon, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    IPTV is MUCH farther away than some seem to think. Besides the poor infrastructure and rural coverage... the ISPs want to charge too much for high-speed and have bandwidth caps and overage charges which will make those services cost WAY more than current cable/satellite that people already think cost too much.

    IPTV is fine as supplemental "TV" but will not ever become a primary source for most people unless and until some major paradigm shifts happen with the ISPs.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. joetex

    joetex Cool Member

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    Agreed. Just bought a Roku box to supplement the Dish and while it is fun, even we went out and installed an OTA antenna, our viewing habits would have to change significantly before IPTV could be an adequate replacement. Not to mention the fact that my ISP wanted an additional $30 per month to upgrade to a faster speed. Add on all of the subscription fees for some of the individual channels that Roku offers on a pay basis and the savings doesn't seem worth it, at least not yet.
     
  3. joetex

    joetex Cool Member

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    Meant to say even if went out and installed an OTA antenna
     
  4. anex80

    anex80 Legend

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    I agree completely! I recently priced out what a cord-cutting scenario would look like for me. I added in the cost of subscription services like Netflix and Hulu, the subscription of an OTA recorder such as Tivo, and what it would cost to purchase all of the shows not available on subscriptions via Apple TV. The savings ended up being only $15/ month which I can easily justify considering the wealth of Sports programming available via Sat that I would not have with IPTV. I can see certain subscription services as a value add but I don't think its viable as a full fledged replacement, at least not for me.
     
  5. sregener

    sregener Godfather

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    Isn't Hulu + Tivo a somewhat redundant system? Most of Hulu Plus (I know, not all) is to give you access to network programming a day or two later.

    Tivo is not the cheapest long-term DVR solution for OTA, though it is probably the nicest. Channel Master's new DVR would work out to be less expensive, but does have a slightly higher sticker price.

    Is it really necessary to purchase all of those shows? For instance, I'm a huge BBC fan, and Top Gear and Orphan Black are two series I really enjoy. Top Gear season 20 DVD is only $12 on Amazon. A month of BBC America was costing me $10. And Orphan Black's DVD will be out shortly after the show airs in the US, and my library will have it available for a loan shortly thereafter. So I can get that one for free. It won't be "the same" as subscribing to BBC America, but it will be a significant cost savings over the course of a year. Cord-cutting to save money takes more than just replacing the delivery system. It takes a different mindset about how important it is to watch the latest stuff.
     
  6. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Yep at a ridiculous price and ridiculous data caps. Verizion is already trying it in our area. Might as well subscribe to Satellite internet.

    Sent from my PantechP8010 using DBSTalk mobile app
     
  7. Wilf

    Wilf Legend

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    Binge watching with no commercials more than makes up for the content not being the latest stuff in my case. After a couple of years with Netflix, I find it next to impossible for me to enjoy anything with commercials - even the 30-sec skip button is annoying.
     
  8. Paul Secic

    Paul Secic Hall Of Fame

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    That will be ten years down the road.
     
  9. lee635

    lee635 Hall Of Fame

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    Sorry guys. :grin: This is a generational thing. Younger folks are cutting the telephone and cable/satellite cord in record numbers. My two teenagers almost never watch Dish and ceratinly would not do something as uncool as watching live TV. We have netflix and amazon and that's about all they watch, plus a lot of goofy youtube-type stuff....
     
  10. Jim5506

    Jim5506 Hall Of Fame

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    Youngsters don't mind watching things on that itty-bitty screen, but as they grow up (age) things will change.

    Their big screen TV may be wireless, but they will not stick with the little screens - too little data on one page.
     
  11. anex80

    anex80 Legend

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    I realize there are cheaper alternatives to my scenario and if I ever actually did take the plunge I would probably utilize them. My point was to as close as possible mimic my current experience with satelite tv.
     
  12. mwdxer

    mwdxer Well-Known Member

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    My grandson lives with me now. I am 65 and he is nearly 19 and it is all about video games, Ipods, Smart Phones. He never listens to a radio or watches Dish. The younger generation growing up will not be supporting what grandpa does. :). By the time these kids hit 30 or 40, the world will be streaming in most places. The first question he asked was "Do you have wifi?" I do, but if I didn't he would not have liked it. I think that is more important than food and roof over his head. They work, then the live for their games and such. Most of them do not interest me. I have Dish, OTA, my BUD, Roku, wifi radio, etc.

    Patrick
     
  13. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    The medium will adjust (which is part of the deal announced in this thread) but there is still a lot of support from the young ones for "event television". The popular show comes on and they watch it live or as close to live as possible. They "sync their second screens". They tweet the shows they watch and hashtag get interactive.

    DISH's Hopper includes apps where viewers can interact. Click the blue button and choose "Social" and you can see tweets about the show you are watching. One can even tweet or post to Facebook directly from the app.

    There are a lot more distractions for a 19 year old than when I was 19. My grandpa rarely watched television. My parents watched with the family. Times changed ... but the concept of "event television" ... gathering around to watch something ... is still strong. We have just changed the device we gather around and how we gather. We still need the content.
     
  14. LazhilUT

    LazhilUT AllStar

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    So I see some of the ESPN channels in HD already...ESPNews and ESPNU...
    Is ESPN Classic going to HD?

    When are the other Disney channels moving to HD as well? My son was watching DisneyXD and it was not in HD.
    What about Disney Junior?
     
  15. Paul Secic

    Paul Secic Hall Of Fame

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    ESPN Classic going to HD already.
     
  16. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The problem with the whole "young people only want" argument... Netflix and things like that are only cheaper now because the revenue is already coming from cable, satellite, and commercial TV... IF people "cut the cord" enough, and the people producing those shows are losing money... then one of two things happens:

    1. They stop making new content.
    2. They start charging the "cord cutter" more for access.

    Youtube is free but has commercials and premium content. Netflix and others have raised prices OR lost access to content.

    This will continue. There is no such thing as a free ride...

    And people tend to forget adding the cost of their mobile data plan or their home broadband to the cost of their "cord cutting" scenario...

    You will pay for the content somehow... or you will not get it.

    It's a "be careful what you wish for" scenario... because if things go the way some folk seem to want them to go... instead of worrying if Dish will pay ESPN or drop their channels... you will be the one who has to directly pay ESPN or not watch their content... and you will not have the negotiating power that Dish currently does when that day comes.

    I, unfortunately, see a day when content might be direct-sold to viewers by the content producer... and they name the price and they are the only way you can get that content... so you will pay or you will not watch... and popular content will cost a lot more because they know you want to watch it.

    I don't think people will like that world once we get to it.
     
  17. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    ESPN Classic is going away ... it will become On Demand only.


    Only the four channels already converted were announced to be coming in HD. There are always possibilities, but I would not expect those two channels in HD.
     
  18. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I will be sad if we don't get DisneyXD and Disney Jr in HD. With all that negotiation time, if they left stuff out of the negotiation it will feel empty and have many (like me) wondering why they couldn't have solved things sooner.
     
  19. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I wouldn't consider the channels left out of the negotiation ... only that in the final agreement it was decided that those two channels would be carried in SD. Not all negotiations end in HD carriage. Perhaps HD carriage is specified for the future (when DISH has more capacity). Perhaps ABC/ESPN felt it was better to have SEC in HD than those two channels.

    While I agree with the concept of "everything in HD" (even the stuff I never watch) it seems that DISH's carriage deal has compromise on both sides. And cooperation to allow for the most popular channels to be available in HD plus a lot of online content available. While the final agreement may not be everything either side nor every customer wanted they came to an agreement.
     
  20. sregener

    sregener Godfather

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    I think most people consider the cost of their home broadband to be irrelevant. I, for instance, would have high-speed Internet at home whether I had pay TV service or not. It's necessary for my education and job search. So using it for video is essentially free. And if I wanted to be a purist and increase the bandwidth for just video, that's only an additional $20/month. Which, combined with Amazon Prime (which I purchased mainly for shipping, but the video is a nice add-on), means I'm paying $28/month for IPTV and getting a ton of other benefits on the side. Compare that to the $70/month I was paying Dish for a Hopper and AT120, and got nothing but television for that price, and it's easy to see why cord-cutting is so popular.

    What will hurt me far more is when the content producers stop releasing DVDs/Blu-Rays of seasons of shows and movies. I don't see my library picking up a video streaming service like they have Overdrive for books. But as long as they keep doing that, I'm able to "stream" a large amount of video for free using my library card.

    I don't think the content producers will be able to name their price. They have a dual revenue stream problem - they can't sell ads on ESPN if nobody buys the service. And without the ability to force bundling, they may actually have to charge less for their service to keep it popular with most people. What will that mean if ESPN loses revenue? It will mean that sports leagues - college and pro - will lose revenue from contracts. Or broadcast may see a resurgence as their ratings climb. Either scenario doesn't sound too bad to me. Right now, we feed the money to ESPN and they feed it to the NFL, Big10, MLB, etc.
     

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