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Transfer from one HD to another - need help

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by rcayers, Apr 29, 2010.

  1. rcayers

    rcayers Mentor

    40
    0
    Jul 30, 2004
    I tried this on the installation forum - no response, so am trying here.

    I want to transfer the contents of one external HD to another. I've been following the instructions found elsewhere but am having a problem:

    The instructions say to connect new drive to SATA Port 0 and the old drive to SATA Port 1. My SATA ports are numbered 1 through 5 (no 0). I assume ports 1 and 2 instead of 0 and 1 aere OK.

    Things seem to go OK for a while. The new drive is shown as sda and the old drive as sdb.

    The first 2 commands go OK
    mkdir /mnt/fap
    mkdir /mnt/hr20

    But when I enter this one:
    mount -t xfs -o rtdev=/dev/sda3 /dev/sda2 /mnt/fap
    I get the following error message: mount: /dev/sda2: can't read superblock

    I know nothing of Unix so I am at a complete loss as to what's going on.

    If anyone can get me back on track it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advqnce
     
  2. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,054
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    That means you didn't follow the instructions completely and do a graceful shutdown. You need to hook the drive back up, boot the DVR and then do a menu restart. When the lights on the unit go out then pull the power to the unit.
     
  3. rcayers

    rcayers Mentor

    40
    0
    Jul 30, 2004
    OK, I got past the "can't read superblock" error.
    Now when I enter mount -t xfs -o rtdev=/dev/sda3 /dev/sda2 /mnt/fap
    I get a new error message: "mount point mnt/fap does not exist"

    I should probably mention that I have not taken the DVR apart. I am working with an external dock for the hard drive. So when I do the graceful shutdown power to the DVR is off but the hard drive is still spinning. Don't know if this is significant or not.
     
  4. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,054
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    Sounds like you didn't run the mkdir command first. You have to run those every time since you are booting from a live disc.
     
  5. rcayers

    rcayers Mentor

    40
    0
    Jul 30, 2004
    Looks like the "graceful shutdown" is required on both drives, and DVR and HD have to be shut off at the same time. Best way to do this is via a power strip. Anyway, this permitted progress and I got up to the point of actually copying the data. Entered the command, got the whole bunch of stuff scrolling down and last entry is "restoring non-directory files".
    But then nothing happens, i.e. HD LED doesn't show an activity. Also there seems to be a lot of error messages in all that stuff that scrolled down - mostly a "failed: Bad File Descriptor" message.

    My frustration level is rapidly rising.
    Any chance we could talk on the phone?
    Thanks
     
  6. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

    17,054
    312
    Jan 4, 2006
    I honestly have no idea how smooth or not smooth the procedure should be since I've never done it myself. I've just read the post a few times and know my way around a *nix box.

    Your best bet would to read the whole post again and maybe ask the original poster.
     
  7. oldbamaguy

    oldbamaguy Legend

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    0
    Jun 1, 2009
    The mkdir creates a "mount point" for the drives.
    I think a more meanful name such as mkdir /mnt/drive1 and mkdir /mnt/drive2
    create names that have "some understanding".
    mnt is "mount" in linux where traditionally they eliminate vowels.
    I kept thinking I don't want to make directories, I want to copy a drive.
    I have convinced myself that the mkdir creates a point in the linux system memory that the data can "flow through".
    If you are copying, you need two points in memory, one to "copy to" and one to "copy from".
    I'm trying to speak in KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) here and I know that the "techies" out there will object to what I have said for one reason or another.
    If someone is speaking in Linux to "ordinary" people, a "translator" is sometimes required.
    Best Wishes Always!!
     

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