Tricks/Tools for compression fittings

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by CJTE, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. ffemtreed

    ffemtreed Icon

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    Jan 30, 2008
    if the ends are already one its not worth redoing them.
     
  2. ffemtreed

    ffemtreed Icon

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    Jan 30, 2008

    See Post #8 in this thread.
     
  3. kucharsk

    kucharsk Godfather

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    Sep 19, 2006
    I tried a flaring tool with Belden 7916A RG6 QS and it would always make the connector impossible to put on, where it went on smooth as butter if I folded the braid over by hand.

    I also think it depends on the connector you're using; I've found the approved PPC EX6XL connectors go on much easier than the Snap-N-Seal RG-6-QS, which I always had to fight withÂ…
     
  4. CJTE

    CJTE Hall Of Fame

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    Tried duplicating that tonight (Cut the sleeve 1/2", then folded the braid back and cut the foil 1/4"). Results were disasterous. Made 3 attempts. The outer sleeve started to bunch up around the bottom of the fitting making it impossible to slide down and also caused the cable to bend in my hand. During one attempt a fitting actually broke (the compression plastic departed from the metal housing). It was a mess. On that same attempt after pulling the fitting off I found that it had begun to strip the outer jacket (where it was being bunched up). The dielectric being so short never had a chance of making it through the fitting, had to cut it off and start over again. At the end of the day, I went back to my method. It may not be entirely correct, but atleast I get moderately decent results. I beleive that the prolem has to do with the plastic beneath the foil being a bit larger diameter than the hole it's being pushed into. Then it hits the braid and im trying to shove the inner ring between the braid and the foil under the outer jacket. I may pickup a small pack of quad shield fittings just to see. I thing the diameter of those fittings is going to be a bit too large and not be able to fit between the braid and the foil under the jacket.
     
  5. rudeney

    rudeney Hall Of Fame

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    May 28, 2007
    Why is the braid pulled back like that? When I strip coax (I use the gray tool that Barry posted a picture of), I have no braid visible at all. The inner wall of the fitting goes between the center insulator and the braid and foil to make the ground connection. I would think all that braid would make it very hard to get the fitting over the cable.
     
  6. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Nov 13, 2007
    Your tool is adjusted incorrectly and is cutting off the shield braid. You should adjust the blade depth until it cuts through the PVC jacket but not into the shield braid.

    The picture shows the correct way to prep the cable. This can be easily verified with any connector manufacturer. If you look at the PPC EX6 cutaway pic I posted, you can see the shield braid has been pulled back over the jacket.
     
  7. JimInNJ

    JimInNJ New Member

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    Apr 3, 2009
    You do realise that the foil should go INSIDE the center tube of the connector, and the braid goes on the OUTSIDE of the center tube, right? It looks like you're pushing the foil down into the jacket, instead of letting it slide up inside. You need to make sure that the foil is laying flat against the dielectric before you try to push the connector on. If the foil won't fit inside, you probably don't have the right connector.

    Good luck!
     
  8. rudeney

    rudeney Hall Of Fame

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    May 28, 2007
    I guess my cutter could be incorrectly adjusted, but I've made literally hundreds of connections this way. Looking at how the connector slips into the cable with it's center coaxial tube going in between the shield and jacket, I don't see that it makes much of a difference. I mean, if I were launching a manned rocket into space, yeah, I might worry about it, but it's just TV.
     
  9. CJTE

    CJTE Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 17, 2007
    Yes.

    There is the dielectric, then a plastic tube, then the foil, then the braid, then the outer jacket.

    The dielectric, plastic tube, and foil, go inside the the tube in the fitting. The tube is then slid down between the foil, and the braid/outer jacket.
    I understand how the system is supposed to work. It seems as though the diameter of the tube within the fitting is just a few nanometers smaller than the plastic tube and foil.
    About half the fittings I have done have slid on like butter, until they hit the bottom of the foil, where it meets the foil and outer jacket. From there, It's usually a lot of twist and push to get the fitting over the rest of the cable.

    When I tried to keep the dielectric and the exposed foil short (1/4" each), the fitting refused to slide down the cable, in such a manor that the cable actually bent and eventually bunched up around the bottom of the fitting in one case.
     
  10. 2dogz

    2dogz Godfather

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    Jun 14, 2008
    Dude, what people are trying to tell you is that you need a flaring tool. Some brands of cable have very tight outside casing, others don't. Some are easy but others you need the tool to stretch the casing to install the connector.

    Get the tool (pictures and links provided above) or change your brand of cable.
     
  11. CJTE

    CJTE Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 17, 2007
    I was trying to find out what the flaring tool did exactly.

    Right now I have less than 0 income but when I obtain an income I will be sure to purchase one.

    THX.
     
  12. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Feb 28, 2007
    That is why they call it a "stinger".

    Joe
     
  13. eandras

    eandras Godfather

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    Feb 15, 2007
    Sorry about hearing the loss of your income (job). I had that problem in June and found a job and started working on 10/1.

    Keep your chin up and just keep networking with people. Hopefully you will find something soon.
     
  14. samrs

    samrs MANC

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    Flat Branch, NC
    That cheap white cable is tough to work with, the electricians around here buy it to wire upscale new homes. They never put on connectors.
    To make a flaring tool you can break one of your connectors apart. I use two pairs of pliers. You want the nut with the inner metall tube still attached and undamaged. Screw it on a spliter, diplexer or I use my pocket toner. Flare away.
     
  15. CJTE

    CJTE Hall Of Fame

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    Sep 17, 2007
    I have quickly come to learn that the inner metal tube likes to scrape away at the foil instead of slide over it (and under the braid).
    Thanks for the headsup on the DIY though.

    And to the person prior, thankyou as well.
     
  16. kucharsk

    kucharsk Godfather

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    Sep 19, 2006
    As I mentioned this depends on the cable and connector.

    I tried using a flaring tool on 7916A and it made it impossible to get PPC EX6XLWS connectors onto the cable; the same connectors slid on like butter when the braid was folded back by hand.
     
  17. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    Jan 4, 2006
    I'm not trying to thread-jack but I just have a quick question on the compression fittings themselves and since there are several pros in here I thought this would be a great place to ask. I hope you don't mind CJTE.

    What is the difference between this connector:

    http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.as...ion-Connector-(Bag-of-50)&c=F-Connectors&sku=

    And this connector:

    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...splay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

    The reason I ask is because all of my previous connections were done with the first connector, with the blue, which I bought at Home Depot and now all they carry is the second type, with the black. Can I use the same compression tool on the black ones as I did the blue ones? I'd hate to have to buy a new tool just because I can't wait for them to come from solidsignal.
     
  18. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, you can use the same tool on both. They are just different brands/models of compression connectors.

    IMO, the best connectors on the market (and I've used over 15 types) is the PPC EX6-XL.
     
  19. RunnerFL

    RunnerFL Well-Known Member

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    Jan 4, 2006
    Thanks for the info!
     
  20. kucharsk

    kucharsk Godfather

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    Sep 19, 2006
    A second recommendation for the PPC EX6-XL.

    I've also been happy with the Snap-N-Seal SNS6 and SNS6QS, but the nice thing about the EX6-XL is it can be used for both regular and quad-shield RG-6 so you don't need to have two different connectors on hand. Other people also figured that one out, as T&B recently introduced their own connector for both regular and QS, the SNS1P6U. Time-Warner cable uses Snap-N-Seals for everything, while the only DirecTV-approved connector is the PPC EX6-XL.

    Meanwhile, my local cable company seems to prefer Digicon DS6s, and the local DISH Network guys tend to use whichever of the three they have on the truck. :D

    You can get any of these pretty inexpensively on FleaBay if you don't mind the shipping times.
     

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