Tried Roku coming back to DTV

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by NOLANSKI, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. Satelliteracer

    Satelliteracer Hall Of Fame

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    Let's put it this way, when programmers are getting $4, $10, $8 for channels from D*, Dish, Time Warner, etc, they are going to expect to get that same amount from these other sources...or else they are killing themselves.

    Here's an example, for what a customer pays for Netflix right now, $8 a month, that wouldn't even cover the industry average for something like HBO. So all those folks that love Netflix at $8, do they still love it at $22 if it includes HBO? Suddenly the pricing gets out of whack...add in internet cap fees for downloads, the price now moves to $40 and you're still not seeing local broadcasts, sports, etc.

    The key to all of this is the content providers and what they allow the Netflix, Hulus, etc of the world to show. Right now ESPN, HBO, (fill in the blank of many content providers) make billions each year from companies like DIRECTV. Will going to direct allow them to make the same kind of money? Will the experience be the same for the customer? ETc, etc.

    Should be a wild decade.
     
  2. Satelliteracer

    Satelliteracer Hall Of Fame

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    That's a double edge sword. For someone like a HBO or Starz, there is definitely a middle man. For a channel that is artificially lowered due to bundling (ESPN, CNN, AMC, etc, etc) that becomes a different issue unless these guys plan on selling via package bundle via IPTV. The reality is, they probably won't. That means that $4 ESPN the customer never sees because it's baked into their $60 overall package now becomes $7 to $10 for that one channel.

    It's going to be a wild decade
     
  3. bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    All depends on what you watch I guess. I replaced DirecTV with an HTPC 18 months ago and even though I've got a job again I'll never look back. There isn't really a single thing I'm missing now that I can't live without. I'm certainly not going to pay $80+ a month to get just a couple programs I have trouble getting online. I'll just wait 6 months and get it from Netflix on DVD. ;)
     
  4. Satelliteracer

    Satelliteracer Hall Of Fame

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    That's why I say it will all come down to the content providers. If they get more disciplined, as many in the industry are predicting, that 6 months becomes a year or more and some programming simply never goes there (question is, will they make people wait that longer or will it be next day? All depends on the provider). Obviously sports on ESPN and such simply don't exist via Netflix, Hulu, etc but require a cable subscription.

    If you're not into sports, willing to wait potentially up to a year in the future, etc then it has no impact at all. So I agree with you to some extent, depends what you watch, when you want to watch it, and if you're ok with quality that might not be where you want it to be.....AKA "Good Enough"... then there are other products out there.

    It's going to be a wild ride....the Netflixes of the world are going to have to price up, they really have no choice. Internet price caps are coming, that will have an effect, and then the biggest wild card...what do the ESPN, HBO, Showtime, networks do to provide their programming and at what risk to the $40 billion they earn now as an industry. Going to be interesting to watch.
     
  5. RD in Fla

    RD in Fla Icon

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    For a big sports fan like myself, none of the other services are even an option at this point.
     
  6. itzme

    itzme Hall Of Fame

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    I know I'm way OT here, but Satracer's comments are really making me think.

    How long has the 'retrans fee' model been around? Since cable in the 80s? More recent? Pre-DVRs?

    Until the past few years, and in my ignorance, I always thought the revenue model involved content providers selling ads, and then wanting as many eyeballs on those ads as possible. I suppose some stations still operate that way (Home shopping and religious channels). In that model the negotiating edge would be on the cable or satellite company to provide those eyeballs. Was it ever like that?

    Now I understand that often the bigger revenue slice for some content providers is the retrans fee.
     
  7. bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    Yep, it will be fun to see what happens. But at least for me there is *nothing* that I have to see "right now" that will make me pay $80-$100 a month again. Nothing.

    There isn't a single sporting event I've missed that I've wanted to see. I didn't miss a single MNF game last year for example.

    Things will certainly change. But I'm not paying anyone be it DirecTV, Netflix or AT&T a big monthly bill again. I've got a lot better things to do with that money and plenty of entertainment options available to me to be beholden to the almighty TV. If that means waiting a year to see something I want to, so be it.

    Then again, I'm not everyone. ;)
     
  8. Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Ok, shameless plug guys. Sorry.

    While I agree that online content has not matured enough, there is a market for it so I hope you guys will visit our sister site to keep an eye on the industry. There are quite a few developments going on that are making things interesting. Just some of the home page entries are an interesting read.

    http://www.iptvconnection.com/
     
  9. tonyd79

    tonyd79 Hall Of Fame

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    I missed how you got an ESPN game every week?
     
  10. cygnusloop

    cygnusloop Hall Of Fame

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    I'm gonna guess he went to the bar...
    ;):D
     
  11. trdrjeff

    trdrjeff Icon

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    I'm considering giving it a shot, with two young ones there's a lot of kids programming on that is easy to replace with Netflix etc. I would really miss the sports though from Speed & Fuel
     
  12. trdrjeff

    trdrjeff Icon

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    4x a month trip to a bar would far exceed my monthly DTV bill :D
     
  13. bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    LOL. Some of that, yes.

    But there is always an ESPN America (Europe) or Armed Forces Network feed out "in the wild" somewhere on the Internet. May get commercials in Bulgarian or Russian, but it's there. ;)
     
  14. TBoneit

    TBoneit Hall Of Fame

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    I have way more than I can watch in the limited time available to me. I could live quite happily with an antenna + my DVD Recorder w/hard drive, Netflix etc.

    Unfortunately the other TV watchers would stage a revolt.

    The WD Hub has a great interface and plays my HD captures fine. DVD Rips also Fine. It sees the NAS I have on the network as well as the two usb drives plugged into it. And I can send or move video or whatever to any of those drives quite easily from my computer. The WD Hub acts as a mini NAS itself as far the drives plugged into it or it's internal drive. The only time I had a problem with the NAS, a 3tb Seagate was when it got almost full. I suspect too many small files.

    As for me if not for other family members I could dump satellite and spend that money on super high speed Internet 101Mbps and be happy. Speeds up to 101 Mbps downstream and up to 15Mbps upstream! To me it is worth the $100 per month that they charge.
     
  15. George_T

    George_T Legend

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    I have Apple TV. Got it mainly to get the MLB.TV package. Still have D* and love it, but the MLB.TV package is about half the price of D*'s MLB EI.

    PQ is not quite as sharp as D*, but more than acceptable on my 58" Samsung plasma. Also picked up Netflix as well, but don't watch a ton of movies, so I'll probably drop it. But both MLB.TV and Netflix have worked well for me. I've had a good overall experience with Apple TV as a supplement to D* this year.
     
  16. NOLANSKI

    NOLANSKI Legend

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    Wow I didn't expect this thread to grow this much!

    While I know IPTV is just in it's infancy and I did do my research (someone said I should have here) the content and picture quality just is not there yet. You really don't know about things until you try it them. I have a great display and I love HD. IPTV isn't there yet for me.

    Nope don't want to wait 6 months for this or that. Navigation is frustrating for my wife and I think that could be greatly improved as well.

    I'm quite happy to be back. 12 months at a rate that is slightly cheaper than all the paid IPTV/Tivo services I currently signed up for...that's awesome plus I still get a discounted rate for the next 12 months after that not nearly as good as the first twelve but I'll take it.
     
  17. ddebrunner

    ddebrunner AllStar

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    I wonder what effect this will have on the program makers, if there's no buzz around the premier of new series/season/episode on a specific evening, then will any show ever gain enough interest to sustain itself? I.e. the water-cooler effect of discussing last night's tv.

    Will the release on a specific day online be enough to generate buzz?
     
  18. whatliesbeyond

    whatliesbeyond Cool Member

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    I agree that IPTV is still too unrefined, and lacking some must-have content. But the world is changing. Technologically and financially. Directv is on a roll right now, but 10 years from now, I think they're going to look like Microsoft does now if they can't figure out a way to get around the IPTV challenge and the bundling advantage offered by cable and phone companies.

    I know, 10 years is a long time, especially in these days, where it's hard to find companies that think beyond the next two quarters. And given the coming decline in the American standard of living, it could well be that every "entertainment" provider will be hurting big time in the coming years. Which probably explains the global marketing effort of Directv and many other companies. Hmmm, maybe these companies really are thinking ahead after all . . . .
     
  19. bonscott87

    bonscott87 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '07

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    For me that hasn't been the case in over 10 years. I got my first DVR (Tivo) back in 2000. Since then I pretty much have no idea what day or time a show is on. I just watch shows whenever I have time.

    But honestly, there really isn't much in the way of "water-cooler" TV anymore outside the big reality competition shows like Idol or Dancing. Beyond that I personally don't hear people talking much about TV shows that were on "last night". Most people I know have DVRs though and don't watch Live TV anymore.

    Most of the shows we watch are still on the networks and we record them on my HTPC via my antenna in free glorious HD. It's just the "cable" shows we watch via Hulu, Netflix or channel web site.
     
  20. tonyd79

    tonyd79 Hall Of Fame

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    Wow. Where do you work? Everyone talks about shows where I work. Big Bang Theory or 2.5 Men or The Office I make it a point to watch the ones that they talk about that night so I am in synch the next morning.
     

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