TV changed a lot in the 2010s, and the decade’s best reflects that

Discussion in 'TV Show Talk' started by Mark Holtz, Dec 22, 2019.

  1. Mark Holtz

    Mark Holtz New Texan

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    Mar 23, 2002
    Richardson,...
    From Ars Technica:

    TV changed a lot in the 2010s, and the decade’s best reflects that
    FULL ARTICLE HERE
     
  2. Mark Holtz

    Mark Holtz New Texan

    11,094
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    Mar 23, 2002
    Richardson,...
    I did not even have a mobile smartphone at the beginning of the decade. I held off until I graduated at the end of 2010, and I treated myself to an Android phone as a personal graduation present to myself, as carriers other than AT&T did not sell the I phone. Never looked back, and never regretted the decision. I remember when, on a New Years bus trip, I was watching some television shows that I had downloaded to my phone and was using a media player. My mother didn't quite grasp the concept. I have a sizable physical media collection, but have been slowly transferring the contents to a Plex Media Server for playback. When I moved to Texas at the beginning of the year, I did not purchase a TV for my own room, electing to watch the media on my phone or tablet.
     
  3. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Apr 17, 2003
    Michiana
    I had a "feature phone" as a cell phone. I didn't get a "smartphone" until late 2011 or 2012. It was about the same time as "cell phones" stopped being phones and started being "pocket computers". My voice minutes are virtually zero while text messages and data are blowing up my phone. In the previous decade I had a 350 minute plan and would occasionally max it out. In this decade I max out the data plan (text and voice are unlimited - since the cell company knows that text is cheap to provide and voice use is minor).

    My elderly (now deceased) parents also changed their usage. I was once the one in my family with a cell phone and dial up Internet. In the 2000s they got interested and ended up with cell phones and faster Internet than me! It was great for their hobbies. They didn't make the transition from traditional TV (linear cable in their case) to more modern methods - even though they were available and paid for. My slightly younger in laws (both alive) have had non-linear TV in their homes most of the decade but did not use it until late last year. They moved and swapped their old cable provider for a new one. The new cable box came with a voice remote and instructions to talk to the remote. That shifted them from linear TV to on demand. They still watch linear TV but often my father in law will just ask the remote for the content he wants and it plays. Magic!

    TV has changed a lot. I'm old, so I have active TVs in four rooms. Two get occasional use. The other two are on most waking hours (kitchen and living room). I rarely watch anything not on TV but my wife and I watch free YouTube content. Like her parents, the TV viewing includes Internet delivered on demand content.
     

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