TVision Shutting Down

Discussion in 'Internet Streaming Services' started by lparsons21, Mar 29, 2021.

  1. lparsons21

    lparsons21 Hall Of Fame

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    And another one bites the dust!

    Tvision to shut down on 4/29/2021 and offer a discounted price for Philo and YouTubeTV.
     
    NashGuy likes this.
  2. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    You know if the discounted price on YTTV will be only for those that signed up for Tvision, or all Tmobile customers? Tomorrow Tmobile should be offering MLB package free.
     
  3. lparsons21

    lparsons21 Hall Of Fame

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    Haven’t seen anything yet to indicate who would qualify.
     
  4. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    All postpaid T-Mobile and Sprint mobile customers qualify based on what I read earlier today. I assume (but don't know) that T-Mobile Home Internet customers qualify as well, seeing as how TV service is a natural companion to broadband.
     
  5. wmb

    wmb Godfather

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    This would be good. I already get Netflix from them, and could use a discount for YTTV.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. ericknolls

    ericknolls Active Member

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    I knew something was up with the so so roll out of TVision. So, Now it bites the dust! Really now

    Sent from my moto g(7) using Tapatalk
     
  7. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    Yet another streaming service bites the dust.

    T-Mobile TVision streaming service shuts down after very short run

    Well that was fast. I tried it a while back. UI was nice but the PQ sucked for streaming. Seemed like a hard sell... about the same price as DirecTV for me. I'm not a cord cutter, but cord cutters cut to save money, so...
     
  8. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    The other way to divest yourself of your TV platform.

    Five months wasn't much of a try considering all of the effort that goes into putting together such a service (and this was their second run at it).
     
  9. Steveknj

    Steveknj Icon

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    I don't think T-Mobiles new CEO was on board with this. So first he cut the idea going through separate boxes, and just streamed through an app. Then after that, they weren't getting much traction (and they really weren't advertising outside of for TMobile users via their app) so I think the idea was to find a partner and offload this, and they did this with Goggle and YTTV.
     
  10. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    What happened is that the company that operates the underlying streaming technology platform, MobiTV, just declared bankruptcy. They also power streaming cable TV services for various small broadband providers, like C-Spire in Mississippi and EPB in Chattanooga, TN. TVision was their largest client (or at least had the potential to become the largest, since it's a nationwide service). But apparently they didn't have their business structured properly to reach profitability soon enough, so they were bleeding cash. T-Mobile threw them a temporary funding lifeline about a month ago but apparently decided that they didn't want to either acquire MobiTV or try to figure out a way to replace them, which might mean re-architecting the TVision service.

    I always wondered why T-Mobile wanted to launch their own cable TV service anyhow, as that whole industry is in decline and there's very little money to be made in it for a smaller player that doesn't own any of the channels/content the service would carry. It's far easier to just resell someone else's service as your preferred partner and get a little commission from them. Zero risk. And that's what they're going to do now by partnering up with YouTube TV and Philo.
     
  11. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    As I posted on the other TVision thread, the bankruptcy of the TVision's underlying technology solutions provider (MobiTV) forced T-Mobile's hand. They were either going to have to invest more resources in it now to keep the thing operational or they were going to have to shut it down (because MobiTV won't be able to keep their servers running much longer). They opted for the latter.

    It's just a hard business. There's not much money to be eeked out as a small cable TV operator. You have to own some of the channels (like Comcast and AT&T both do) and/or you need to have a large customer base. I expect that FuboTV will eventually shut down too.

    YouTube TV and Hulu with Live TV are now probably big enough to survive (and are owned by deep-pocketed parents who can absorb losses until they achieve scale, if they haven't yet). I see those two, along with AT&T TV, being the only streaming cable TV services to go the distance. And if Comcast wants to jump in the game, of course, they could make it work too.
     
  12. Steveknj

    Steveknj Icon

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    I agree. And it's pretty much what I expected. The whole business will consolidate. And with that, prices will start to reach cable/sat prices. It's just a different method of getting the same thing. I'd imagine that VZW might survive too and that FIOS will mix with some sort of streaming service like this. But of course, there might be less of an appetite for linear TV going forward that will make this all moot.
     
  13. evotz

    evotz Active Member

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    I just don't see "live" TV as being a huge entity going forward. Who watches "live" TV anyway? The only content that needs to be served up "live" are sports and news.

    If/When Bally Sports releases their OTT offering - that would seem to solve a lot of the "live" sports.

    "Live" news isn't that difficult, see CBS News and best I can tell Fox News' Roku app is free.

    How much longer until Turner starts an OTT service?

    And then what will you need linear "live" TV streaming service for?

    The argument could be made that some people can't get Internet (which is true), so DirecTV and Dish would have to serve those folks. But since we're arguing for streaming services, I don't really include them in this discussion.

    I have Sling TV, but honestly I don't watch it that much. I used it this past week for the NCAA tournament games on Turner (which would be solved by a Turner OTT offering or March Madness OTT offering). I'll sometimes use it for filler TV - when I'm not really sitting down in the room but have the TV on. I'll sometimes watch the Star Wars marathons that TNT has or The Simpsons on Freeform (both are available on Disney+ anyway).

    Maybe there could be a case for local channels, if you're not able to get all of your locals OTA. Locast would seem to solve that, if available in your market. Or perhaps that's something these big streaming companies need to pick up on, a cheap locals only offering.

    You can possibly argue that by the time you get all of these OTT streaming packages you're approaching the cost of linear cable and that may be true. But you can watch the library of content (other than sports and news) whenever you want. And you don't have to subscribe to all of them.

    I just don't see future generations plopping down on the couch and say "Let's see what's on TV tonight!" instead they're going to have their TV viewing already planned out ahead of time and will watch it when it's convenient for them.
     
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  14. wmb

    wmb Godfather

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    I’m not sure I see a long future for any of the cable, satellite, or vMVPD streaming providers. The proliferation of content providers going direct to consumer with OTT packages is going to be game changing. In the least, it will convince them their best option is not going direct to consumers, which could give cable cos bargaining leverage. Getting access to a handful of channels direct from the provider is going to be cheaper than the mega cable/satellite package of old, assuming you can limit the number you have to buy.

    But, if T-Mobile couldn’t compete nationally, with relatively deep pockets, who would be able to jump in now as a startup? Right now, my local telco has a fiber-based video service... I wonder how much longer they offer that? They already market YTTV on their internet-only marketing page, and they bundle their 250 Mbps service with HBOMax.

    That said, with $10 off YTTV per month for having T-Mobile makes the cost $55 per month, which is palatable for a mid-tier cable-like package.


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  15. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    Does anyone have the Tmobile Android TV dongle that can tell me how its speed is? They are going to keep selling them, apparently. Might be an interesting device if their YTTV app gets modified to work with the full featured remote like the ATT box
     
  16. techguy88

    techguy88 Well-Known Member

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    The $10 off YTTV and Philo will be ongoing for the customers who had TVision, T-Mo customers will get $10 off for 12 months
     
  17. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    You are assuming everybody is in your boat. Financially, streaming/OTT only makes sense for people with multiple TVs. If you have a lower TV count, its the same price as DirecTV or more (assuming you negotiate your DirecTV price). Also assuming you can get all your channels from one provider. I used to need 4-5 to get all the channels I actually watch... but I guess I need one less channel now as that show seems to have gotten cancelled and that was one of the tougher channels to find on OTT. Now I could probably get away with 2-3 + PBS. So not saving anything and introducing a bunch of hassle by going OTT.

    Also, I watch linear shows, I don't want to watch ads, I want to FF through them and I like having everything under a single UI. Juggling UIs and multiple DVRs is a pain.
     
  18. evotz

    evotz Active Member

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    Actually, I just have the one TV. Streaming makes sense to me because I can watch it on my big screen or I can watch it on my tablet if i'm stuck in the office for some reason.

    Obviously there's going to be outliers that need/want traditional linear live TV. But I think that's going to be a very small minority. Doesn't make sense for the majority of the population to have to subsidize for the few in the minority.

    ESPN is another one that I watch that is currently only on linear cable. Again, though, ESPN could probably split this off into it's own OTT streaming (they've done it with ESPN+ but that largely only shows secondary content). Of course, ESPN is a leaking money faucet, they have to hope that linear cable stays around so the non-watchers can help subsidize the watchers, otherwise they're in huge, huge trouble.
     
  19. techguy88

    techguy88 Well-Known Member

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    Disney's new NFL contract that takes effect with the 2022 season now allows them to stream every NFL game that airs on ESPN and ABC on ESPN+. Also ESPN+ will get 1 exclusive NFL game per year. ABC gets 2 Super Bowls.
     
  20. SledgeHammer

    SledgeHammer Icon

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    No offense, but you obviously haven't done your homework (by a LONG shot)!
    1. Hulu with Live TV (4 million subscribers as of Feb. 11, 2021)
    2. YouTube TV (More than 3 million subscribers as of Oct. 29, 2020)
    3. Sling TV (2.474 million subscribers as of Dec. 31, 2020)
    4. Philo (750,000 subscribers as of August 2020)
    5. AT&T TV Now (683,000 subscribers as of Sept. 30, 2020)
    6. Fubo TV ( 545,000 subscribers as of Dec. 31, 2020)
    As of the fourth quarter of 2020, DirecTV had 13 million pay TV subscribers in the United States
    As of the fourth quarter of 2020, Dish Network had 8.82 million pay TV subscribers,

    As of March 2021, the number of pay TV households in the United States stood at 74 million

    The last number includes sat & cable. So that's 74M vs. (I'll be generous and round it up) 11M OTT subs.

    That means OTT is a mere drop in the bucket @ 12.9%. Hardly the majority lol.

    ALSO, keep in mind that the 12.9% number is being a bit generous since a lot of people subscribe to multiple services to get all their channels. So to be fair, you'd have to count UNIQUE OTT subs to compare to cable since nobody would subscribe to Dish AND DirecTV. Youtube is commonly stacked with Philio for example.

    But even at the double (or more) counted subs at 12.9% still not a majority. Linear definitely not your "tiny minority" lol.

    Now that's not to say linear subs aren't declining, but if you think it'll be a tiny minority any time soon... well, I got a bridge in brooklyn to sell you.
     
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