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UHD (4K)

Discussion in 'DISH™ High Definition Discussion' started by georgewells, May 15, 2015.

  1. WestDC

    WestDC Well-Known Member

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    So, Should that happen He would lose his ipad as well as a 50% of every thing else
     
  2. jclangston

    jclangston Cool Member

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    I know Directv is going to broadcast The Masters in 4K. Has there been any talk of any Dish 4K channels? I have had Direct for several year but I like the idea of the Hopper 3 and dish equipment.
     
  3. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    nope
    soon to be
    soon to be​
     
  4. tcatdbs

    tcatdbs Icon

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    You say "upconverts everything" how do Dish primetime shows look? Thinking of getting the Vizio p65. Will need to upgrade my old Hopper too (or will I if the TV upconverts everything?) Curious what 1080 Dish primetime looks like on a 4k set.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
     
  5. Jhon69

    Jhon69 Hall Of Fame

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    I have the 2015 M55-C2 Vizio 4K UHDTV and it upconverts very good the 1080i from my Dish receiver.

    The best upconversion is when my TV upconverts a 1080p Bluray movie and now my setup is even better because I purchased a Sony 4K upconverting Bluray player.

    The new Hopper 3 would give you 4K streaming capability plus a few more tuners to use.

    If/When Dish adds any 4K channels you would be ready with the Hopper 3.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. bmcleod

    bmcleod Mentor

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    I realize this thread has been around for a while, but one thing that hasn't really been mentioned is that one of the reasons UHD TVs look so good with HD content, is because the base technologies of the display are in most cases drastically better than the sets they are replacing. Local dimming, more zones, higher contrast, higher refresh rates, better blacks, and all the other manufacturer specific blah, blah, blah that really does make for a better picture regardless of the resolution. Sure the upscaling on some is better than others (like all the other technology), but I'd bet these other qualities have at least as much to do with the better looking picture than the higher resolution and upscaling does.

    I had planned to buy a UHD by now, but my 73" DLP is still looking pretty good, and I want to rebuild my entertainment center so I'll probably wait another year and see what the next CES brings to market. Maybe by then there will be more content, more HDR compliance, more OLED, bigger screens, and more of the blah, blah, blah at lower prices. Buy it if you need it, but I'm happy to wait a while longer. Hopefully Dish will have some solid UHD offerings, and Oppo's 4K model will be out by then as well.
     
  7. DanoP

    DanoP Legend

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    The only reason I'm considering a 4k now is because I have a 10 year old 50" panny plasma that tops out at 1080i which means that my xbox connects at 720p. I kind of would like a larger (65") TV. However, 4k content is still very sparse and I find it difficult to believe that there will be much content in the near future considering the bandwidth required to transmit 4k images. And unless you get OLED you're going to struggle with good blacks and in the case of edge lit displays (like the Sony 930Ds) splotchy clouding/uneven lighting. And still, OLEDs aren't great with motion which doesn't seem acceptable given the price. So, we have a still emerging, flawed technology (much more flawed than our old, defunct plasmas) with little content. Not a pretty picture at the moment.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. chriscpmtmp

    chriscpmtmp Legend

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    I jumped in 2 months ago. There is way more 4k content than during the rollout of HD. The Olympics 4k channel is the best I've seen. The NFL is always the ultimate for me. Hopefully that will be ready for the next SB.
     
  9. bmcleod

    bmcleod Mentor

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    So I see I last commented here two years ago, and still I have no UHD TV ... but I have one on order which should arrive in the next couple weeks. I think for now 4K Blu-ray will be my only source, my Internet speed is just enough to stream HD and nothing faster is available.

    Are there any UHD offerings on Dish or DirectTV, that don’t depend on your Internet, that is they come all or mostly from Satellite? I’ve had Dish a long time but don’t mind changing.

    Edit: Is there a better thread for UHD discussion on either service?
     
  10. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    dish have one ch 540, DTV use three ch 104/105/106 - it's your choice
     
  11. bmcleod

    bmcleod Mentor

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    Thanks for the info! I even called Dish a month or so ago and asked about UHD, they said there wasn’t anything. I’ll give 540 a look when the set arrives.
     
  12. bmcleod

    bmcleod Mentor

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    Ok, follow up question...does watching Netflix via Dish use your Internet connection, is there a way not to?
     
  13. Jim5506

    Jim5506 Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, it does.

    Not unless you can get your neighbor to let you use his.
     
  14. bmcleod

    bmcleod Mentor

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    Since I’m his tech support that is a possibility, but his connection is slower than mine so that wouldn’t help.

    The gist of my questions is that in my part of rural America we can barely stream HD, and no chance of UHD. No cable either, hence Dish. I’m looking for any way I can use my Dish pipe for more (and better) content. Since Dish has the bandwidth for HD, it would be nice if they’d allow Netflix to use that pipe, but maybe that would require a change to the Netflix App architecture. Thanks for the info.
     
  15. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Satellite is good for broadcast ... one to many simultaneously. Separate streams for each subscriber eats bandwidth. Separate streams can work on a satellite internet provider that uses spot beams so they are not wasting national satellite bandwidth serving just one customer. The DBS platform works best when they are sending the same signals to 13+ million subscribers ... not unique signals to each subscriber.
     
    bmcleod likes this.
  16. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    dish should rent SW-1/SW-2 for sat two-way Internet connections
     
  17. bmcleod

    bmcleod Mentor

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    That makes total sense, I hadn’t thought it through.

    When I first moved here about 15 years ago I used Starband for Internet access (work payed for it). It was a whopping 1Mbps download which was decent at the time (T1’s we’re still considered fast), but the high latency and about 100Kbps upload was hard to work with (still, better than dial-up). I know the satellite services like Hughes are faster now, but I don’t think they get much better than the 6 to 10 Mbps (2-3 up) I get from a rural wireless ISP.

    What kind of speed could dish deliver?
     
  18. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    TOP 3 DISH Internet Plans - Bundle with Dish TV | DishPromotions.com
     
  19. bmcleod

    bmcleod Mentor

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    Interesting, they say “plans up to 25 Mbps”, then elsewhere “Browse the web at speeds as fast as 500Mbps”, I didn’t know they could do 25. HughesNet’s best plan gives 25 Mbps up to 50 GB for $99 (before they throttle) — using 7GB/Hour for UHD, you could stream about 7 hours or 420 minutes of UHD per month — so maybe four average movies, or three sci-fi/adventure types that tend to run longer. Add the cost of the movie and you’re looking at $30-$40 per shot (if all my numbers are right ... and I just woke up). Pricey, but I asked.

    So, has anyone streamed a UHD movie via satellite?
     

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