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Verizon FIOS pursuing Broadband-Based transmission/distribution, why hasn't DirecTV?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by 1948GG, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

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    Aug 4, 2007
    Today come word that VerizonFIOSTV is pursuing broadband distribution of their tv product.

    Okay, the thing sticking in my craw for a LONG time is, why hasn't DirecTV done so a long time ago?

    Broadband speeds have slowly crept up over the past x years, and seem to lately be taking off like a rocket. In my own 'neck of the woods', fiber to the premises has started to give Goggle a run for their money, as Public Utility District fiber plants in eastern Washington State have gotten gigabit level fiber to Apple Orchards (population density there is pretty low), not to mention the city of Seattle started a 1G project to the home, fed off muni fiber that was 'plowed in' over a decade ago (but needed a good 'shove' to actually get some going as they are prohibited from actually providing the service 'directly', they needed some local companies to do the final feet from the curb to the home).

    DirecTV is in a perfect position to become a provider in these plants; they already have the IP-based reciever/DVR boxes (made for years for large scale condo/apartment plants), so they would only need to 'grab' the signal off the sat with a nice dish and feed it down these fibers. The customers wouldn't need dishes (impracticable in large cities if not in the typical tree-laden communities around these parts) and the bandwidth used would hardly be noticeable on these gigabit systems.

    So, where are you DirecTV? Get off your behind!
     
  2. JosephB

    JosephB Icon

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    Birmingham, AL
    It's not that simple..

    You're confusing two separate concepts. Verizon looking into offering broadband distribution means offering it directly to consumers who subscribe to any ISP. It's not the same as partnering with some fiber company to push Verizon content separately down the fiber. That's what they do with FiOS.

    Most fiber providers are providing their own TV services. Plus, the market of municipal fiber is so insignificant, it would not really be worth DirecTV trying to push into that market.

    And, when it comes to IP distribution of their content, there's not much for DirecTV there either. Most providers have some kind of a cap, either hard or soft, making buying a full TV package from someone other than your ISP troublesome. Plus, to do this, DirecTV would have to invest insanely into new hardware. It's not as simple as just "putting up a dish and pushing it down the fiber". I suspect Verizon's foray into this is really related to offering it over their LTE network, which is why they're trying to gut network neutrality. So, you would have truly unlimited bandwidth to watch FiOS programming, but if you wanted to watch Netflix you have a cap.
     
  3. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

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    Aug 4, 2007
    That's what's being done here, as the 'content' cannot be provided by the fiber owner (either Seattle City or the PUD's), it's against state law.

    TV content is the HARDEST part of doing fiber. You're up against the 'big boys', i.e. Comcast, et. al. and is the most expensive if you try to do it yourself as a secondary provider. All the fiber providers in our state here barely have one tv provider each, if that (most have none)..

    'So insignificant?' You gotta be kidding me. In this state alone we are approaching 1M homes passed, and that's NOT counting the largest market, Seattle (deals aren't done yet). Muni fiber is the 'next big thing', with Verizon (and Frontier for that matter) not building any new plant except for extremely small add-ons. Washington State has always been in a good place as we've had public power systems since the 1930's; another place to look at would be Tennessee (TVA-land) which has tons of public power infrastructure... AND, some of the largest fiber plants outside of FIOS in the US.

    Lots of places have had it with the 'duopoly' dragging their feet and assigning their communities to the internet backwater. Verizon sees the handwriting on the wall, and want's a piece of the action. They will have to 'plumb in' the signals, just like any provider, so , my question stands: Why not DirecTV?
     
  4. inkahauts

    inkahauts Well-Known Member

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    Nov 13, 2006
    Very very few people as a percentage if the population will have fiber to their house in the next 10 years or more. Your area may be way ahead of the curve but the over all population is very far away from it.


    Sent from my iPhone using DBSTalk mobile app
     
  5. 1948GG

    1948GG Icon

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    Aug 4, 2007
    And, exactly how many customers (or sites for that matter) have the IP-based systems? Those are the ones in condo and community based tv service? Extremely small but DirecTV spent the bucks to have specialized headend and receiver/DVR equipment designed and produced...

    I think there is some confusion as to whether Verizon is going to try a 'Netflix' style system, 'over the top' subscription, to where they would have to get it all signed off by the programmers (AMC/HBO et. al.), to where they'd run into the same problems with the carriers (cable) as Netflix (which is why the press release had an interesting part about net neutrality), and exactly how they would transmit their programming to the data head-end (another little glitch that Netflix has been wrestling with), or go with what I've always thought, simply buy the bandwidth on the system to stream your bits. If the system is (like the fiber systems here) 'open to all' (and where multiple operators, video/data/whatever can compete on an even basis), then I see no problem.

    I realize that 'open to all' is not the rule in many places, and the net neutrality really doesn't exist in those (or many really) places.
     
  6. JosephB

    JosephB Icon

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    Nov 14, 2005
    Birmingham, AL
    Except that "open to all" only exists in less than 1% of the systems in the country. It's not so simple to just plug in the MDU fiber system that DirecTV has for condos into a municipal fiber system. And again, most (maybe not where you live) systems are doing their own thing when it comes to providing video on their systems.
     

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