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Vinyl record showing resurgence

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Cholly, Jun 9, 2008.

  1. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    Sigh.....the good old days of turntables and tape decks, I miss those days sometimes.
     
  2. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    You tape guys will get a kick out of this. This is the test gear that the techies where I worked used for calibrating machines before they went out the door to the customer. http://www.slack.com/images/TE/Amber4400.jpg
     
  3. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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  4. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    ^ I've drooled over that Ivie piece in the past. It's schweet!

    Well, La-De-Da! :rolleyes:

    :D ;)

    I've still got a working Revox A77 around here, so there, Half Track Boy! [​IMG]

    You can make it up to me by buying me this for Christmas. :grin: (Make sure you scroll down to the bottom of the page.)

    I ran my own tape deck clinic, where customers would bring in their cassette decks and I would tweak them up, adjusting the speed (the speed spec for decks is ± 3%, which is well over half a step sharp and flat), head azimuth and bias settings. Give me a good deck and after 15 minutes, I could get the speed an order of magnitude tighter, ± 0.3%, and frequency response of 30 to 15K ± 2dB. A good Nak would take that high end response up to 18K at least, and the bass down to 20 Hz.

    My clinic wouldn't touch a McIntosh turntable clinic, though. I ended up buying, and still own, a stereo microscope with a light stage because of those clinics. Anybody else ever take their turntable into a McIntosh turntable clinic? Back in the '70s, when setting up a turntable meant balancing the tonearm properly, they'd do a real number on your turntable. That alone made me a McIntosh fan for life. Listening to a McIntosh system in the store didn't hurt, either. :D
     
  5. WERA689

    WERA689 Well-Known Member

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    Canton, GA
    Wow, that's a magnificent re-work of a top-notch tape deck! And those guys are local to my family and where I grew up.
     
  6. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    I have FOREVER wanted one of those Technics closed loop RTR decks. Very nice machine, somewhat designed after that fine Minnesota product, the 3M closed loop professional machines.

    My current RTR collection includes a Teac A-3300SX (1/4 track), which sits on the desk next to my computer and my computer speakers (JBL LSR4328P's), a Revox B-77 (1/4 track) which needs a new roller to work properly, and a Tascam 42B (1/2 track). My previous RTR collections have included an Ampex consumer deck that I can't recall the model of (similar to this but without the amplifiers and speakers, etc. http://cgi.ebay.com/AMPEX-850-STERE...39:1|66:2|65:12|240:1318&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14 ), a Teac 2300SX, Teac 7300-2T (nice machine), Teac 3340S, and a Tascam 80-8. The stdio that I used had an Ampex 300-4 half inch 4 track, an Ampex 350 half track, a Presto half track, and, later on, an MCI 1" 8 track. Before they bought the MCI I used to haul my 80-8 into the studio and use it there. I even had an Anvil case (with wheels) for it.

    Here's my old cassette deck that I bought on dealer accommodation: http://cgi.ebay.com/Eumig-FL-1000uP...39:1|66:2|65:12|240:1318&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14 One of you guys should buy this and fix it.
     
  7. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    I was a Tandberg guy, owning a couple of TD-20A SE reel to reels, both quarter track models. They were great sounding and working machines, but the problem with them was their glass heads. They'd crack with time and start tearing up tapes. New heads cost a fortune and they weren't worth repairing. I eventually threw both machines away. Not good for $1,500 reel to reels. Even on accommodation, that was too much money to waste.

    Typical Tandberg - great sound, great mechanical build, and a crucial fatal flaw.

    The one thing I did right I did totally by accident. Tandberg recommended Maxell reel to reel tape so that's what I used, almost exclusively, instead of the Scotch and Ampex tape everyone else used. Maxell used a different formulation and their tape didn't crap out like Scotch and Ampex did. My live tapes of bands I recorded from the '70s and '80s are completely playable today without baking. Dumb luck, but very good dumb luck.
     
  8. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    Tandberg, with cross field recording, a method that was stolen by Akai/Roberts for a short time. When I first started recording I was using Scotch 150 (another fine 3M abrasive). I used some Agfa a few times and then pretty much standardized on Maxell once it was available. The stero shop I worked for started carrying it. When I went into the pro audio area I went to Ampex 456. I'll pull out some of each and see how they play now a bit later.
     
  9. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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  10. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    I bet that's a Nakamichi in sheep's clothing. The give-away is the meters. Those are Nak meters. Nakamichi did a lot of OEM work. That's how they got started. Do you know that the first good cassette deck, the Advent cassette deck, was built by Nakamichi? I also remember a Sonab cassette deck (anybody else remember this Swedish speaker company from the '70s?) that was a Nakamichi 500 in a different case.

    I'd have to see the heads to know for sure but it smells like a Nak.

    No thanks, Richard. Another tape deck I threw away was a Nakamichi 700II that I had a great tech completely rebuild. It sounded wonderful for a couple of years and then something happened - I want to say the motor went out but I can't remember for sure - and the part was no longer available. There wasn't even a close replacement. I checked with my buddies in Nakamichi technical support (I had some inside connections) and they said, Sorry, Charlie.

    Time for a dumpster toss. That one hurt, too.
     
  11. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    The Eumig cassette deck was made in Austria, the rest of their stuff was made for them in Japan. Eumig was a maker of film projectors when they got into this. It had some VERY unique cirtuitry, including an opto biasing circuit that relied on a light bulb in the guts of the machine. It was the first microprocessor controlled cassette deck and ended up in more than a few radio stations for automation use.
     
  12. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    For the uninitiated, there was a second head across from the record head that drew the magnetic flux into the tape. It was a great idea to get saturation on the tape without having to resort to high field strength, which caused problems with cross talk onto adjacent channels and even demagnitizing the tape in extreme situations.

    This was used on their "10" series of decks but not my TD-20A SE. They liked the focus provided by the glass heads better. The fools!
     
  13. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    Cool. Maybe they bought parts from Nakamichi.

    "The world is a parts bin." - Dr. Godehard Gunther, a/d/s/
     
  14. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    Oh wow, film projectors, a lot of memories there......my teachers always called on me to set them up, because they, nor anyone else in the class knew how to.

    You guys are sure bringing back a lot of memories from when I was a kid.
     
  15. Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    I just started laughing to myself, thinking about throwing away the two Tandbergs and the Nak. Add to that a Yamaha class A amp I owned that was killed by my cat taking an accidental pee in it, and that's about $4,000 in gear at my cost that I threw away in the '80s and the '90s.

    The reason I'm laughing is that it could have been worse, in fact, much worse. This was the '80s. I could have wasted the $4,000 on cocaine. [​IMG]
     
  16. Richard King

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    No.... not in LaCrosse, Ws. :lol:
     
  17. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    I picked up one of these (the one on the top of the page) http://www.moviestuff.tv/workprinter_series.html a while back. I'll be using it with a Canon GL-2. My first adv. hits the local weekly paper on Sept 17. Wish me luck.
     
  18. Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    Indian...
    Speaking of RTR tape recorders: my first was a MagneCordette single track recorder with 10.5 inch reel adapters that I bought at Allied Radio in Chicago in the early 50's. It consisted of a Magnecord professional transport (PT-6J) coupled with a consumer oriented record/play preamp in a portable carrying case. I had it converted for half track operation before trading it at the HiFi Shop in Madison, Wisconsin (in 1958?) for an Ampex A122 prosumer recorder (mono record, stereo playback), which I later had converted for quarter track playback (still half track mono record).
    In the early sixties, in a moment of weakness, I traded the Ampex for an Eico stereo recorder kit, which I stll have (and still works, but not in current use). Certainly not as good as the Ampex or Magnecordette. At some point in time, I bought a Technics RP-75 cassette deck, which I still have. (You can tell I was married with kids by then).
     
  19. TheRatPatrol

    TheRatPatrol Hall Of Fame

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    Wow thats cool.

    I'm don't remember what kind we had in school, but they seemed to work well.

    And good luck. :D
     
  20. Richard King

    Richard King Hall Of Fame

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    I went to an open house about 3 weeks ago (just trying to keep up on how bad the market is getting). The house was being sold as part of an estate. The owners are in an assisted living center and they were selling the house and contents. They had price tags on all the furniture and fixtures. In the corner of the dining room was a pile of records. I asked how much they wanted for the records and they said make an offer. I offered $20. They said take them away. There are a total of about 250 records, mostly classical, but with a few jazz, and old blues. I figure I can at least get my money back on Ebay.
     

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