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Virginia man says Walmart suspected him of kidnapping his kids because they’re biracial

Discussion in 'The OT' started by fluffybear, May 28, 2013.

  1. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    It all depends on the area. While our local Wal-Mart does not have a uniformed security guard, the Wal-Mart 12 miles east in another community does. As a matter of fact, there is also a police sub-station located in the same shopping center as the Wal-Mart.

    I have also been to one Wal-Mart (Brea, CA) where there was only 1 way in and out of most of the aisles.
     
  2. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    It depends on the store. Some like a uniformed presence to scare off the bad guys ... others go for the non-uniformed presence to catch the bad guys. The greeters and rest of the staff provide some level of security. (I've been told that crooks don't like to be recognized ... looking someone in the eye and acknowledging their presence can scare off some criminals. "They saw my face.") There is a lot going on in a retail store in loss prevention. Uniforms can be a part of the plan.
     
  3. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The only time I've noticed security at our local Wal-Mart stores... is at the 24hr ones, and then it is once you get past 9pm or so when they start to lock down one of the entrances... I don't recall the security being so obvious during normal shopping hours.

    As to the "What would I do"... I think I already answered that.

    IF I thought I saw something, I would stick with it until I found out otherwise... IF I found out I was wrong, I would say I was sorry for stirring up the trouble.

    If you're not shy about going to security and reporting seeing something that "doesn't look right" then you shouldn't be shy about answering questions later. Anonymous reporting is fine when you turn in a gangster or a terrorist and you fear for your safety... but when you think you are stopping a child abduction I would think you would want to know IF they child in question was safe after all... or are we saying that as a "concerned citizen" you would just go about your business once you passed the buck to store security? That tends to say you don't care as much as you think you do if you can drop it that casually.

    The argument has been posed in this thread... what if you say nothing, wouldn't you feel guilty later? Ok... I agree with that... so how are you going to know if you don't follow up? Wouldn't you stick with security or the police and follow up to see what happened? And if you find out you were right, you might feel good for reporting it... but if you find out you were wrong, why wouldn't you feel bad about that and want to apologize to the family? Unless you don't think you were wrong, because what you "saw" was just your own misgivings about the nature of this family.
     
  4. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Typically the procedure is that the police take the report and collect your information and will contact you if they need more information so I'm not really sure what good hanging around would accomplish.

    As I mentioned before there is a likelihood the individual who made the initial complaint may not even be aware of the trouble their complaint caused.
     
  5. James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Thanks to the family going to the media people all over the US know that the children are fine. No need to check back.

    If I didn't hear anything in a couple of days I might check back ... but that is covered in this situation.

    Some people like to walk into the middle of a fire and stand there until they are burned. I would not recommend that.

    There is so much angst and even hatred being expressed against this anonymous person that I agree with their decision to remain silent. Try to do a good thing and end up being accused of being a racist? At this point the anonymous person does not need to defend themselves ... they don't need to face down the family and the media and say "no, it was not the race difference between the man and children that I saw as odd" and then be accused of lying.

    The "we're always the victim" family would likely not accept any explanation than and admission that their assumption was right. Why bother?
     
  6. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Give it up dude!
     
  7. damondlt

    damondlt New Member

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    Agree.
     
  8. fluffybear

    fluffybear Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    :raspberry
     
  9. BattleScott

    BattleScott Hall Of Fame

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    Actually, I kind of disagree with you on this part. The way I see it, the customer is really walking away taking none of the blame. Basically, it is Wal-Mart left holding the bag for this situation because everyone pretty much agrees the police officer had little choice in the matter and the parents and media both seem to think the security guard is either lying about it being a customer that came forward, or they think they should prioritize racial sensativies over the welfare of the children.

    Now I agree that they likely have no interest in correcting that by coming forward and taking on the blame voluntarily, but up to this point the story is simply that Wal-Mart and their security operations are racist and bigoted.
     

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